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Customer driven marketing

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Proposal for a TCBL Business scenario

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Customer driven marketing

  1. 1. Customer-driven marketing A WP4 scenario
  2. 2. Objectives • Drive fashion by scaling up of crowdsourced ideas • Engage customers and users in fashion experience • Add value to items of clothing: highlight value in fabrics, sewing, cut • Allow factories freedom of choice and guaranteed production • Create a continuous scenario linking one-off with mass production • Tighten distribution to reduce travel and shipping • Explore possible role of TCBL as brand
  3. 3. Starting point: production of 1 • Custom-designed and custom made • Recovery of the traditional tailor’s atelier: collective imagination • Made to measure – requiring however ability to cut properly • Choice of design: improved ownership • Experience of production, involvement in the process • Emergent models aim to give the sensation of self-design • Mass customisation approaches give choice but little sensuality • Social networks can identify models and promote designers
  4. 4. Single production model • Self-design supported by background services • Actual production at home or in traditional or co-work laboratories • Delivery in loco or via web • Infinite variations of design possibilities, opportunities for designers • Social networks can identify winning trends and models Design and cut services Custom(er) designed order of 1 Home sewing or local lab E-com- merce or direct delivery Social & fashion network approval Fabric micro- logistics Thousands of different models
  5. 5. Next step: local series production • Promising models identified through social networks, fashion bloggers • Retail potential through local shops, web fashion services, etc. • Clothes are sized but addressing local tastes and trends • Niche markets focusing on lifestyles, service innovations, etc. • Local series assembly in large shops or small factories • Fabrics and cutting can be centrally optimized to reduce costs • Global upscaling potential measured by social networks + sales
  6. 6. Series production model • Designs selected by local/regional startup brands • Flexible production through a range of channels, incl. social centres • Distribution through local shops and franchises, niche web shops, etc. • Limited number of models, continuous re-stocking (bricks-web mix) • Social networks identify emergent global styles Cutting, placement services Niche market designs, orders of 100 Local labs and small factories Local shops, niche chains, web Social & fashion network scaling up Multi-step distribu- tion logistics Hundreds of models, constant turnover
  7. 7. Next step: mass production • Promising models identified through social networks, fashion bloggers • Factories can select models and propose to retail outlets • Retail potential through large scale distribution, web shopping • Clothes are winning models at a competitive prices • Fabrics and cutting in multi-level distribution chain • Global appeal builds on «history value» of models (who, where…) TCBL as «umbrella brand»?
  8. 8. Mass production model • Designs selected by producers for global potential • Mass production with guaranteed orders, shared control • Distribution through large chains and shopping web • Fixed set of models, timed to fit with season changes • Social networks reinforce TCBL brand value Business process services Global market designs, orders of thousands Large factory networks Branded large distribu- tion, web Social & fashion brand support Co- managed supply chain logistics Tens of models, timed turnover
  9. 9. Integrated ecosystem • Bottom-up marketing drives fashion by user engagement • Production re-gains bargaining power, distribution as a service • Service elements scale up individually from one level to next • Original value of artisan-made custom design remains • Garments acquire specific history and personality • Customers have choice in terms of quality and fit
  10. 10. Integrated ecosystem Design and cut services Custom(er) designed order of 1 Home sewing or local lab E-com- merce or direct delivery Social & fashion network approval Fabric micro- logistics Thousands of different models Cutting, placement services Niche market designs, orders of 100 Local labs and small factories Local shops, niche chains, web Social & fashion network scaling up Multi-step distribu- tion logistics Hundreds of models, constant turnover Business process services Global market designs, orders of thousands Large factory networks Branded large distribu- tion, web Social & fashion brand support Co- managed supply chain logistics Tens of models, timed turnover
  11. 11. Next steps • Understand what this is: one of many scenarios or a first stab at «the» scenario • Understand what is missing: ethical aspects? environment? • Map onto this the contribution of the Design, Making, Place labs (where they fit in, what kind of service concepts are needed) • Map onto this where different Business Pilots could fit in and how (and what the related transition scenarios would look like) • Map onto this different best practice cases we are finding like the Fashion Tech Week startups (and how other services, especially on the retail side, fit in)

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