Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Evolution of LTE Towards B4G (2014)

1,912 views

Published on

3GPP Standardization   Status
Candidate  Technologies  for  B4G   and   Beyond
• Device  to   Device  (D2D)   Communication
• Full Dimension MIMO (FD ‐ MIMO)
• CoMP with  Non ‐ Ideal  Backhaul
• Network  Assisted  interference   Cancelation  and  Suppression  (NAICS)
• Millimeter Wave (mmWave)  Communication
Concluding   Remarks

Published in: Sports
  • Be the first to comment

Evolution of LTE Towards B4G (2014)

  1. 1. 1 Evolution of LTE Towards B4G  and Beyond Yongjun Kwak, Ph.D. (yongjun.kwak@samsung.com) Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Digital Media and Communications R&D Center
  2. 2. 2 Table of contents  3GPP Standardization Status  Candidate Technologies for B4G and Beyond • Device to Device (D2D) Communication • Full Dimension MIMO (FD‐MIMO) • CoMP with Non‐Ideal Backhaul • Network Assisted interference Cancelation and Suppression (NAICS) • Millimeter Wave (mmWave) Communication  Concluding Remarks
  3. 3. 3 3GPP Standardization Status
  4. 4. 4 3rd Generation Partnership Project  Initiated in December, 1998 for development of wireless communication standards  Collaboration between groups of telecommunications associations • China: CCSA (China Communications Standards Association) • Europe: ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute) • Japan: ARIB (Association of Radio Industries and Businesses), TTC (Telecommunication Technology Committee) • Korea: TTA (Telecommunications Technology Association) • USA: ATIS (Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions)  Specification work done in Technical Specification Groups • GERAN (GSM/EDGE Radio Access Network): GERAN specifies GSM radio technology, including GPRS and EDGE • RAN (Radio Access Network): RAN specifies the UTRAN and the E‐UTRAN • SA (Service and System Aspects): SA specifies service requirements and overall architecture of 3GPP system • CT (Core Network and Terminals): CT specifies the core network and terminal parts of 3GPP © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary W‐CDMA  (1999) W‐CDMA  (1999) HSDPA (2002) HSDPA (2002) HSUPA (2005) HSUPA (2005) LTE (2008) LTE (2008) LTE‐A  (2010) LTE‐A  (2010) B4G  (2014) B4G  (2014) 5G5G CDMA, QPSK DL: 16QAM AMC, HARQ UL: AMC, HARQ DL: OFDMA, MIMO UL: SC‐FDMA CoMP, CA, eICIC UL: MIMO backward compatible backward compatible Rel‐99 Rel‐5 Rel‐6 Rel‐8 Rel‐10 Small cells,  FD‐MIMO backward compatible? Rel‐12
  5. 5. 5 Industry Participation in 3GPP  Over 100 companies involved in LTE specification development • Mobile Vendors: Samsung, Nokia, Blackberry, LGE, ZTE, Pantech, Motorola, HTC, Apple, … • System Vendors: Ericsson, Huawei, Alcatel Lucent, Nokia Siemens Network, … • Chipset Vendors: Qualcomm, Intel, MediaTek, Broadcom, NVIDIA, … • Service Operators: CMCC, Vodafone, Orange, Verizon, AT&T, KDDI, Sprint, Deutsche  Telekom, Korea Telecom, SK Telecom, NTT DOCOMO, Telecom Italia, Softbank, … • Measurement Instrument Vendors: Agilent Technology, NI, Rohde & Schwarz, … • Terminal Location Providers: TruePosition, Polaris Wireless, .. • Research Firms: InterDigital, ETRI, ITRI, III, … © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  6. 6. 6 LTE Release 8: First LTE Specification © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary 10ms radio frame, Tf #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 Subframe Slot, Tslot 0.5 msec 1msec #0 Resource Block (RB) Resource element (k,l) l=0 l=Nsymb DL -1 Symbol Subcarrier 15kHz k = nPRB*NSC RB 4x4 DL MIMO OFDMA / SC‐FDMA: 1.4MHz – 20MHz Flat RAN architecture Key technologies Requirements Target Peak transmission rate (Mbps) >100 (DL), >50 (UL) Peak spectral efficiency (bps/Hz) >5 (DL), >2.5 (UL) Average cell spectral efficiency (bps/Hz/cell)  >1.6–2.1 (DL), >0.66–1.0  (UL) Cell edge spectral efficiency (bps/Hz/user) >0.04–0.06 (DL), >0.02 –0.03 (UL) User plane latency / Control plane latency (ms) < 10 / <100
  7. 7. 7 LTE‐Release 10: LTE Advanced (LTE‐A) © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary Key technologies Carrier Aggregation 8x8 DL MIMO 4x4 UL MIMO Time‐domain Inter‐cell Interference Coordination Cell range  expansion Almost Blank  Subframe Requirement Target Peak transmission rate (Mbps) 1000 (DL), 500 (UL) Peak spectral efficiency (bps/Hz) 30 (DL), 15 (UL) Average cell spectral efficiency (bps/Hz/cell)  2.4–3.7 (DL), 1.2–2.0  (UL) Cell edge spectral efficiency (bps/Hz/user) 0.07–0.12 (DL), 0.04 –0.07 (UL)
  8. 8. 8 LTE‐Release 11: Network Coordination for LTE © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary  Key Technology: CoMP (Coordinated Multi‐Point Transmission and Reception) • Allows network to coordinate wireless resources (time, frequency, transmission power, etc) • Significant improvement in system performance (Average: 20~30%, Edge: 30~40%) • Well suited for C‐RAN (Centralized Radio Access Network)
  9. 9. 9 Ongoing LTE Enhancement © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  10. 10. 10 LTE Roadmap 1H 2H 1H 2H 1H 2H 1H 2H 1H 2H 1H 2H 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Release 11 (LTE‐A) Release 12 (Beyond 4G) Release 13 (Beyond 4G) 2011.09 Stage 1 Stage 3 ASN.1  Freeze 2011.03 Stage 1 Rel‐12 and  onwards WS 2012.6 2014.06 Stage 3 ASN.1  Freeze 2014.09 2012.09 2013.03 Release 14 (5G) 1H 2H 2017 Projected  completion of R13 Projected  completion of R14 © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  11. 11. 11 Candidate Technologies for B4G  and Beyond
  12. 12. 12 Device to Device Communication
  13. 13. 13 Device to Device (D2D) Overview  Cellular communication
  14. 14. 14 Device to Device (D2D) Overview  Direct communication between devices © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  15. 15. 15 D2D Techniques  Wifi‐Direct • Target use case: peer to peer connectivity • Using unlicensed band (2.4GHz, 5GHz) based on Wifi • Currently used (standardization completed)  D2D proximity based service (D2D ProSe) in LTE • Target use case: Discovery based proximity service (Advertisement, SNS, etc) • Using licensed band (*850MHz1,3, 900MHz2, 1800MHz1,2, 2100MHz3) based on LTE • Currently standardized in 3GPP © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary * (1: SK Telecom, 2: KT, 3: LG Uplus) Wifi‐Direct use cases
  16. 16. 16 Wifi‐Direct vs. D2D ProSe • Wifi‐Direct : two step discovery  • Device discovery: broadcast request  followed by unicast response • Service discovery: Inquest request  followed by unicast response • LTE ProSe : one step discovery  • Device broadcast its discovery and  service information together • Faster discovery with low power  consumption Step 1 device discovery Device & service discovery in one step Step 2 service discovery Wifi‐Direct vs. D2D ProSe
  17. 17. 17 Delay ▶ Long discovering time for service discovery Scalability ▶ The number of connected devices is limited. Range ▶ Small range (less than 100 meter) Power  Consumption ▶ Asynchronous carrier sensing protocol Interference ▶ Low reliability of the radio link Limitation of Wifi‐directWifi‐Direct vs. D2D ProSe
  18. 18. 18 D2D Prose: Component Techniques  Peer discovery • UE discovers other UEs proximate to itself • Mainly for commercial use case  Direct communication • UE transmits data to other UE(s) with network  assistance inside network coverage • Broadcast communication is studied in Rel‐12  Out of network coverage • D2D communication should also be supported in  out of network coverage • Key feature for public safety use case © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  19. 19. 19 D2D Discovery: Physical design © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary  Design principle • Type 1 discovery — Network configures resource pools for D2D discovery — D2D UE randomly selects a resource inside the resource pool for the transmission D2D  UE tries to receive multiple discovery signals inside the resource pool • Type 2 discovery — Network allocates a UE where to transmit its discovery Resource pool for D2D discovery WAN data WAN data WAN data ... ... ... ... Resource pool for D2D discovery Resource pool for D2D discovery PRBs subframes
  20. 20. 20 D2D Discovery: Possible scenario © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  21. 21. 21 D2D Direct communication: Synchronization © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary  Synchronization procedure • If no synchronization source is detected by a UE, a UE may transmit D2DSS (D2D  sync Signal)  • D2DSS relaying is considered • UE synchronize its receiver to the detected D2DSS transmitted from a sync source • UE detects a sync source as follows — ENB synchronization has the highest priority as a sync source for D2D UEs — Synchronization sources which are UEs within network coverage have a higher priority  than synchronization sources which are UEs outside network coverage  Cell eNB D2D UE3:  Independent Sync source cluster D2D UE1 D2D UE2
  22. 22. 22 D2D Direct communication: Data scheduling © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary© SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary Cell eNB cluster UE1 UE5 UE3 UE4 Tx Rx Tx Rx UE2 Tx Rx UE6 Rx Scheduling D2D Data (Broadcast)  Resource allocation procedure • Mode 1: eNB schedules the exact resources used by a UE to transmit direct data — Mainly used for inside network coverage • Mode 2: a transmitting UE on its own selects resources to transmit direct data — Mainly used for out of network coverage • To be discussed in 3GPP how to schedule for partial coverage case Mode 1 resource allocation Mode 2 resource allocation
  23. 23. 23 Full Dimension MIMO
  24. 24. 24 Full Dimension MIMO (FD‐MIMO) Concept  Utilization of two‐dimensional antenna array • Allows flexible beamforming in both azimuth and elevation domain  High order MU‐MIMO • Simultaneous transmission to large number of UEs 4xCPRI IP network
  25. 25. 25 2 Dimensional Beamforming  Example 1: 70/70 degrees without down tilt  Example 2: 70/40 degrees without 30 degrees down tilt © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary 2×8 antennas 4×8 antennas 8×8 antennas 2×8 antennas 4×8 antennas 8×8 antennas
  26. 26. 26 1‐Dimensional Array (64x1): dH = 0.5λ © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary   902    701      100 ,70 1 1       110 ,90 2 2    MU interference virtually non‐existent  using 64‐antenna horizontal beamforming  At 700MHz, 64 antennas with half lambda  spacing is 15m long!
  27. 27. 27 2‐Dimensional Plane (8x8): dH = 0.5λ, dV = 0.5λ © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary Azimuth Elevation Low MU  interference from horizontal  beamforming High MU  interference from vertical  beamforming   701    902    1001   1102 
  28. 28. 28 2‐Dimensional Plane (8x8): dH = 0.5λ, dV = 4λ © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary   701   902    1001   1102  Azimuth Low MU  interference from horizontal  beamforming Elevation Low MU  interference from vertical  beamforming
  29. 29. 29 FD‐MIMO Standardization Status © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary  New scenarios  New channel model  New antenna model New path loss and LOS probability model ‐ Simplified model   Element generated model ‐ Example: 10° vs. M=8 element pattern for vertical domain TR36.814 New Model 1 1 1 1 1 ‐ Scatters in vertical domain ‐ Correlation for LS parameter DS DS K SF ASD ASA K SF ASD ASA 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 DS K SF ASD ASA ESD ESA DS K SF ASD ASA ESD ESA TX RX ASD ASA ESD ESA Scatter ‐ Pathloss gain for high‐rise UE ‐ LOS prob. of high‐rise UE PL=PLOS(HUT) PL=PNLOS(HUT=1.5m) Height gain = a(HUT‐1.5) UMi (Urban micro) UMa (Urban macro) High‐rise scenario Stadium, mall, airport 6~8floors 10m TX 6~8floors 25m 20floors
  30. 30. 30 FD‐MIMO System Level Simulation  Simulation Setup: • Two tier 57 sectors • K=10~30 UEs per sector • Center frequency 2GHz, bandwidth 10MHz • UE speed 3km/h uniformly distributed • UE: 2 Rx, 1Tx © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary NT-V NT-H NT-H NT-V 1 1 • Element gain - 3dB BW-V:90 degree - 3dB BW-H:90 degree - Peak gain: 6.4dBi
  31. 31. 31 FD‐MIMO Evaluation Results (1/3)  Performance with minimum spacing of half λ or two λ between elements • NT = NV x NH= 8, 16, 32, 64 antenna elements • With 2λ spacing in vertical domain, achieve 57% gain over half λ spacing • Metric: Average Cell throughput (bps/Hz) © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary (V/H)=(0.5 λ/0.5λ) spacing (V/H)=(0.5 λ/2λ) spacing
  32. 32. 32 CoMP with Non‐Ideal Backhaul
  33. 33. 33 Inter‐eNB CoMP with Non‐Ideal Backhaul Release 11 CoMP Release 12 CoMP‐NIB • Focuses on air‐interface aspect only  Relies on proprietary interface between  eNBs  Not designed for robust performance in  networks with non‐ideal backhaul • Should support network interface for  inter‐eNB coordination  Support coordination among eNBs of  different vendors  Design to provide robust performance  even in networks with non‐ideal backhaul
  34. 34. 34 Centralized Scheduling Between eNBs  Stage 1: Resource coordination • Central resource coordinator decides which TP gets which frequency/time resource • Relatively robust against backhaul latency  Stage 2: UE selection and link adaptation • Conveys resource coordination result to TPs — Each TP is notified of its own resource allocation and those of neighboring TPs • Each TP runs channel opportunistic scheduler based on latest CSI from UEs © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary UEs reports CSI to eNB eNBs forward CSI to  resource coordinator Resource coordinator  decides which eNB gets  which resource Resource coordinator  notifies resource  allocation to eNBs eNBs uses latest CSI and  resource coordination of other  eNBs to perform scheduling
  35. 35. 35 Two‐Stage Resource Allocation  Stage 1: Resource coordination • Central resource coordinator decides which TP gets which frequency/time resource • Relatively robust against backhaul latency  Stage 2: UE selection and link adaptation • Conveys resource coordination result to TPs — Each TP is notified of its own resource allocation and those of neighboring TPs • Each TP runs channel opportunistic scheduler based on latest CSI from UEs  Impact of time delay • Resource coordination: less sensitive  can handle larger time delays • UE selection and link adaptation: more sensitive  large performance degradation © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  36. 36. 36 Inter‐eNB CoMP Evaluation Results  Coordination size: N cells • 2N‐1 ON/OFF combinations considered • Left table considers 7 combinations  Resource coordinator selects ON/OFF  combination with best metric  Resource coordinator informs each cell’s  scheduler of resource allocation • Cell2: no resource assigned • Cell1: resource assigned • Cell3: resource assigned  Resource coordinator informs each cell’s  scheduler of interfering cells • Cell2: ‐ • Cell1: notified that Cell3 is interfering • Cell3: notified that Cell1 is interfering  Each cell’s scheduler selects UEs and  adjusts MCS level according to  interfering cell(s) © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary Cell1 Cell2 Cell3 Sum Rate Alt 1 ON/OFF ON ON ON 5 Rate 2 1 2 Alt 2 ON/OFF ON ON OFF 4.8 (↓0.2) Rate 2.3 (↑0.3) 2.5 (↑1.5) ‐ Alt 3 ON/OFF ON OFF ON 6.5 (↑1.5) Rate 3.5 (↑1.5) ‐ 3 (↑1) Alt 4 ON/OFF ON OFF OFF 4 (↓1) Rate 4 (↑2) ‐ ‐ Alt 5 ON/OFF OFF ON ON 5.5 (↑0.5) Rate ‐ 2.5 (↑1.5) 3 (↑1) Alt 6 ON/OFF OFF ON OFF 4 (↓1) Rate ‐ 4 (↑3) ‐ Alt 7 ON/OFF OFF OFF ON 4.5 (↓0.5) Rate ‐ ‐ 4.5 (↑2.5)
  37. 37. 37 Network Assisted Interference  Cancellation and Suppression
  38. 38. 38 Network Assisted Interference Cancellation/Suppression  Advanced receivers for terminals • Can boost system performance and end‐user experience • Requires highly complex terminal implementation  NAICS (Network Assisted Interference Cancellation/Suppression) • Network provides information on interference to terminal • Based on network information, terminal applies advanced receiver  © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary NAICS for inter‐cell interference NAICS for intra‐cell interference • Cell A & Cell B exchange info on PDSCHA & PDSCHB • Info on interference is forwarded to terminals  Inter‐cell interference cancellation/suppression • Info on PDSCHA & PDSCHB are available at eNB  No need for information exchange • Info on interference is forwarded to terminals  MU‐MIMO interference cancellation/suppression
  39. 39. 39 NAICS Evaluation Results  Joint symbol level reduced maximum likelihood receiver • Input to turbo‐decoder is calculated assuming knowledge of  interference modulation — Random interference of a discrete constellation (QPSK, 16QAM, 64QAM, etc) • LLR calculation is done assuming interference of a discrete constellation — Compared to a zero mean Gaussian distribution © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary Is InmS Is InmS I nmS I nmS DD P P bP bP LLR XX X IS X IS nm nmnm xx xx xx xx x x x x xxy xxy y y , , , , , ,),( 1 , 0 , 1 , 0 , maxmax ),|( ),|( ln )1|( )0|( ln             Mean Packet Rate (bps/Hz) Packet Rate @5%‐tile (bps/Hz) Packet Rate @50%‐tile (bps/Hz) MMSE‐IRC 1.66 0.0% 0.26 0.0% 1.23 0.0% R‐ML 1.82 9.4% 0.30 17.0% 1.42 15.4% Mean Packet Rate (bps/Hz) Packet Rate @5%‐tile (bps/Hz) Packet Rate @50%‐tile (bps/Hz) MMSE‐IRC 1.10 0.0% 0.12 0.0% 0.71 0.0% R‐ML 1.31 19.0% 0.17 32.5% 0.92 28.8% Simulation results @60% RU for NAICS scenario 1 Simulation results @40% RU for NAICS scenario 1
  40. 40. 40 Millimeter Wave Communication
  41. 41. 41 Spectrum Candidates  Requirement: Large Chunks of Contiguous Spectrum • Examples: 13.4~14 GHz,  18.1~18.6 GHz,  27~29.5 GHz,  38~39.5 GHz, etc. EESS (Earth Exploration‐Satellite Service)            FSS (Fixed Satellite Service)       RL (RadioLocation service),  MS (Mobile Service)         FS (Fixed Service)          P‐P (Point to Point)                     LMDS (Local Multipoint Distribution Services)
  42. 42. 42 Friis’ Equation in Free Space (1/2) © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  43. 43. 43 Friis’ Equation in Free Space (2/2) © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  44. 44. 44 Prototype for mmWave Beamforming  Samsung’s demo system for mmWave mobile technology • Adaptive antenna array technology • Evaluated in outdoor environment © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary Carrier Frequency 27.925 GHz Bandwidth 500 MHz Max. Tx Power 37 dBm Beam width (Half Power) 10o
  45. 45. 45 Test Results – Range  Outdoor Line‐of‐Sight (LoS) range test • Error free communication possible at 1.7 km with > 10dB Tx power headroom • Pencil BF both at transmitter and receiver enables long range communication © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  46. 46. 46 Test Results – Mobility  Outdoor Non‐Line‐of‐Sight (NLoS) mobility tests • Adaptive joint beamforming and tracking effective at 8 km/h mobility even in NLOS  © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  47. 47. 47 Test Results – Building Penetration  Outdoor‐to‐Indoor penetration tests • Most transmissions successfully received by an indoor MS from an outdoor BS • Successful penetration of transmissions through tinted glasses and doors © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary
  48. 48. 48 Concluding Remarks
  49. 49. 49 Evolution Towards B4G and Beyond…  Wireless standards have evolved throughout the years • 1G (AMPS)  2G (GSM, IS‐95)  3G (W‐CDMA, cdma2000)  4G (LTE, Wibro)  With each generation came new features and capabilities • 1G  2G (1990’s): Analog  Digital (10kbps) • 2G  3G (~2000): higher than 200kbps, CDMA • 3G  4G (~2010): higher than 1Gbps, OFDMA, MIMO • 4G  B4G (~2015): FD‐MIMO, small cell enhancement, D2D • B4G  5G: ?  B4G and 5G evolution will bring in yet another set of features • To handle explosion of wireless traffic • To be more cost effective • To handle different services, communication scenarios, devices © SAMSUNG Electronics Co., Ltd. Confidential and Proprietary

×