A Historical Look At Love…      By Jessica Sullivan                             1
Introduction Looking back on the history of dating and courtship, many   things have changed over the years. Throughout ti...
History Of Love         Where did love come from?Plato judged that the basis of love is centeredupon the mutual struggle f...
Courtship• Courtship is the traditional dating period before  engagement and marriage. During a courtship, a  couple dates...
DatingDating is a form of courtship, and may include anysocial activity undertaken by, typically, two personswith the aim ...
Tokens Of AffectionIn Norway when a girl came of age, her father let it be knownthat she was available for marriage. The g...
Marriage           7
• Marriage is a social union or legal contract between  individuals that creates kinship. It is an institution in which  i...
Wedding Traditions                     9
• A wedding is the ceremony in which two people  are united in marriage or a similar institution.  Wedding traditions and ...
Wedding Customs  Traditional America          • White Dress           • In a Church         • Exchange of Rings     • Fath...
Wedding Customs         From Around the World• Japan-Traditional Shinto ceremony held at shrine,  Kimono is worn, very ext...
Types of Weddings    • Civil Wedding      • Elopement• Same-Sex Wedding• Destination Wedding   • White Wedding • Weekend W...
The Honeymoon• According to an old French custom, as the moon went  through all its phases the couple drank a brew called ...
ErasTime has run its way and it has changed     the entire concept of romance.Let’s see how love has changed over the     ...
Ancient Times• In ancient times, many of the first marriages  were by capture, not choice. Men raided the  villages for wi...
Greek/Roman Mythology                    Pyramus & ThisbePyramus and Thisbe are madly in love and live inhouses next to ea...
Greek/Roman MythologyOther Famous Couples in Mythology       Orpheus & Eurydice        Cupid and Psyche       Pygmalion...
Aphrodite  Aphrodite was the Greek goddess of love and beauty. In the story of the Trojan War, the Trojan  Paris awarded A...
Arthurian LegendsTwo of the most invincible knights in Arthurs  realm were Sir Tristan and Sir Lancelot of    the Lake. Bo...
Lancelot & Guinevere   The tragic love story of Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere is   probably one of the best-known stori...
Queen Guinevere                  22
Tristan & Isolde     The tragic love story of Tristan and Isolde has been told and retold    through various stories and m...
Medieval                   I love you so much, truly, that one                   could sooner dry up the deep sea         ...
Courtly love was a medieval Europeanconception of nobly and chivalrouslyexpressing love and admiration. Generally,courtly ...
Victorian   Tis better to have loved andlost, than to have never loved at                 all.  - Lord Alfred Tennyson (18...
Victorian    During the Victorian Era (1837-1901), romantic love became    viewed as the primary requirement for marriage ...
Shakespeare“My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep; the more I give to thee, the      more I have, for both...
Romeo and Juliet Romeo and Juliet is atragic tale of two lovers  from feuding families who fall in love at first sight, ma...
Love In LiteratureIn the fairytales there is always abeautiful princess looking for loveand a handsome Prince Charmingon a...
Colonial Times•   Women were scare in early America. No women accompanied the settlers who established    Jamestown, Virgi...
1940’s/1950’s                32
1940’s Life was simple during these times.. Womenstayed home to take care of household chores    and the children. World W...
1950’s•   How to Have a Happy Husband.•   (The following was excerpted from a 1950s high-school, home-economics textbook.)...
Film•   "Gone With the Wind" can be identified as    one of the immortal pieces of literary works    in this world. Margar...
Present Time• The world of dating has changed  dramatically since ancient times.• Traditional courting has been replaced  ...
References• www.wikipedia.com             www.sparknotes.com• www.genealogy.com             www.cbsnews.com• www.history.o...
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A historical look at dating

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A historical look at dating

  1. 1. A Historical Look At Love… By Jessica Sullivan 1
  2. 2. Introduction Looking back on the history of dating and courtship, many things have changed over the years. Throughout time, dating has played a significant role in establishing who weare: our customs, traditions, values, etc. Let’s take a look at how developing relationships have evolved with the times… 2
  3. 3. History Of Love Where did love come from?Plato judged that the basis of love is centeredupon the mutual struggle for truth. Some think that the emotion of love in humans is evolved from the mother infant relationship in earlymammals. Science seems to indicate that loveis nothing more than big-chemical reactions in our bodies. What is love? 3
  4. 4. Courtship• Courtship is the traditional dating period before engagement and marriage. During a courtship, a couple dates to get to know each other and decide if there will be an engagement. Usually courtship is a public affair, done in public and with family approval.• It includes activities such as dating where couples go out together for a meal, a movie, dance parties, a picnic, shopping or general companionship, along with other forms of activity. Acts such as conversing over the telephone, writing each other letters, and sending each other flowers, songs, and gifts constitute wooing. 4
  5. 5. DatingDating is a form of courtship, and may include anysocial activity undertaken by, typically, two personswith the aim of each assessing the otherssuitability as a partner in an intimate relationship oras a spouse The word refers to the act of meetingand engaging in some mutually agreed upon socialactivity. Traditional dating activities includeentertainment or a meal. 5
  6. 6. Tokens Of AffectionIn Norway when a girl came of age, her father let it be knownthat she was available for marriage. The girl would wear anempty sheath on her belt. If a suitor liked the girl, he would puta knife in the sheath, which the girl now wore as a sign thatshe was betrothed.Dating back to 17th century Wales, ornately carved spoons,known as love spoons, were traditionally made from a singlepiece of wood by a suitor to show his affection to his lovedone. Chivalrous gentlemen in England often sent a pair ofgloves to their true loves. If the woman wore the gloves tochurch on Sunday it signaled her acceptance of the proposal. 6
  7. 7. Marriage 7
  8. 8. • Marriage is a social union or legal contract between individuals that creates kinship. It is an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually intimate and sexual, are acknowledged in a variety of ways, depending on the culture or subculture in which it is found. Such a union may also be called matrimony, while the ceremony that marks its beginning is usually called a wedding.• People marry for many reasons, including one or more of the following: legal, social, emotional, economical, spiritual, and religious. These might include arranged marriages, family obligations, the legal establishment of a nuclear family unit, the legal protection of children and public declaration of commitment.• Marriage practices are very diverse across cultures, may take many forms, and are often formalized by a wedding.[The act of marriage usually creates legal obligations between the individuals involved. 8• Marriage is usually recognized by the state, a religious
  9. 9. Wedding Traditions 9
  10. 10. • A wedding is the ceremony in which two people are united in marriage or a similar institution. Wedding traditions and customs vary greatly between cultures, ethnic groups, religions, countries, and social classes.• Most wedding ceremonies involve an exchange of wedding vows by the couple, presentation of a gift (offering, ring(s), symbolic item, flowers, money), and a public proclamation of marriage by an authority figure or leader.• Special wedding garments are often worn, and the ceremony is followed by a wedding reception. Music, poetry, prayers or readings from Scripture or literature also may be incorporated into the ceremony. 10
  11. 11. Wedding Customs Traditional America • White Dress • In a Church • Exchange of Rings • Father Gives Away Bride • Flower Girl/ Ring Bearer • Bridesmaids/Groomsmen • Bride Throws Bouquet • You May Now Kiss the Bride.. “Something old, something new,Something borrowed, something blue, And silver sixpence in your shoe.” 11
  12. 12. Wedding Customs From Around the World• Japan-Traditional Shinto ceremony held at shrine, Kimono is worn, very extravagant• Scotland-Kilt is worn, Newlywed couple leave the ceremony to the sound of bagpipes• India- Wedding lasts for several days, Sari is worn, Haldi is performed where the bride and groom are anointed with paste• Africa- “jumping the broom” symbolizes sweeping away past wrongs or warding off evil spirits 12
  13. 13. Types of Weddings • Civil Wedding • Elopement• Same-Sex Wedding• Destination Wedding • White Wedding • Weekend Wedding • Military Wedding • Double Wedding 13
  14. 14. The Honeymoon• According to an old French custom, as the moon went through all its phases the couple drank a brew called metheglin, which was made from honey. Hence, we get the word, honeymoon.• The dictionary defines it as a holiday or trip taken by a newly married couple.• Some believe that the honeymoon originated as an ancient “Babylonian practice that involved drinking mead, a honey- based alcoholic drink, for a lunar month after a marriage.”• A Norse legend tells that after kidnapping ones bride, she was kept hidden away until pregnant or her family stopped looking for her, and then was brought back to formalize the wedding.”• Regardless of its origin—today the honeymoon is a time for a couple to celebrate their marriage and new life together and 14 their love for one another that made it possible.
  15. 15. ErasTime has run its way and it has changed the entire concept of romance.Let’s see how love has changed over the years… 15
  16. 16. Ancient Times• In ancient times, many of the first marriages were by capture, not choice. Men raided the villages for wives. Marriages were arranged. 16
  17. 17. Greek/Roman Mythology Pyramus & ThisbePyramus and Thisbe are madly in love and live inhouses next to each other. Their parents, however,forbid their romance and build a wall between thehouses. The lovers find a chink in the wall throughwhich they speak and kiss one another. One nightthey decide to run away together, meeting at theTomb of Ninus. Pyramus arrives first, and she sees aterrifying tiger with blood on its mouth. She runsaway in fear, dropping her cloak. The tiger tears upthe cloak and bloodies it. When Thisbe arrives, hesees the cloak, assumes his lover has died, and killshimself in sorrow. Pyramus returns, sees Thisbesbody, and kills herself with the same knife. From thenon, mulberries take on the dark red color of their 17
  18. 18. Greek/Roman MythologyOther Famous Couples in Mythology  Orpheus & Eurydice  Cupid and Psyche  Pygmalion & Galatea  Baucis & Philemon  Helen of Troy and Paris 18
  19. 19. Aphrodite Aphrodite was the Greek goddess of love and beauty. In the story of the Trojan War, the Trojan Paris awarded Aphrodite the apple of discord after judging her to be the most beautiful of the goddesses. She then sided with the Trojansthroughout the war. Aphrodite was married to the ugliest of the gods, the limp smithy Hephaestus. She had many affairs with men, both human and divine. 19
  20. 20. Arthurian LegendsTwo of the most invincible knights in Arthurs realm were Sir Tristan and Sir Lancelot of the Lake. Both of them, however, were involved in illicit and tragic love unions - Tristan with Isolde, the queen of Tristans uncle, King Mark; Lancelot with Guinevere, the queen of his sovereign, King Arthur. 20
  21. 21. Lancelot & Guinevere The tragic love story of Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere is probably one of the best-known stories of Arthurian Legend. Lancelot fall in love with Queen Guinevere, King Arthurs wife. Their love grew slowly, as Guinevere kept Lancelot away from her. Eventually, however, her love and passion overpowered her and the pair became lovers. One night, Sir Agravain and Sir Modred, King Arthurs nephew, led a band of 12 knights to Guineveres chamberwhere they burst in upon the lovers. Discovered, Sir Lancelot made a fighting escape, but poor Guinevere was not so lucky. She wasseized and condemned to burn to death for her adultery. Fear not. SirLancelot returned several days later to rescue his beloved Guinevere from the fire. This whole sad affair divided the Knights of the RoundTable and weakened Arthurs kingdom. Poor Lancelot ended his days as a lowly hermit and Guinevere became a nun at Amesbury where she died. 21
  22. 22. Queen Guinevere 22
  23. 23. Tristan & Isolde The tragic love story of Tristan and Isolde has been told and retold through various stories and manuscripts. It takes place during medieval times during the reign of King Arthur. Isolde of Ireland was the daughter of the King of Ireland. She was betrothed to King Mark of Cornwall. King Marksent his nephew, Tristan, to Ireland to escort Isolde back to Cornwall. During the voyage, Isolde and Tristan fell forever in love. Isolde did marry Mark of Cornwall, but could not help but love Tristan. The love affair continued afterthe marriage. When King Mark finally learned of the affair, he forgave Isolde, but Tristan was banned from Cornwall. Tristan went to Brittany. There hemet Iseult of Brittany. He was attracted to her because of the similarity of hername to his true love. He married her, but did not consummate the marriage because of his love for the "true" Isolde. After falling ill, he sent for Isolde in hopes that she would be able to cure him. If she agreed to come, the returning ships sails would be white, or the sails would be black if she did not agree. Iseult, seeing the white sails, lied to Tristan and told him that the sails were black. He died of grief before Isolde could reach him. Isolde died soon after of a broken heart. 23
  24. 24. Medieval I love you so much, truly, that one could sooner dry up the deep sea and hold back its waves than I could constrain myself from loving you. - Guillaume de Machaut (1300- 1377)For where there is true love, a manis neither out of measure lifted upby prosperity, nor cast down bymishap; whether you give or takeaway from him, so long as hekeeps his beloved, he has a springof inward peace. 24
  25. 25. Courtly love was a medieval Europeanconception of nobly and chivalrouslyexpressing love and admiration. Generally,courtly love was secret and betweenmembers of the nobility. It was also generallynot practiced between husband and wife.Courtly love began in the ducal and princelycourts of Aquitaine, Provence, Champagneand ducal Burgundy, at the end of theeleventh century. In essence, courtly love wasan experience between erotic desire andspiritual attainment that now seemscontradictory, "a love at once illicit andmorally elevating, passionate and disciplined, 25humiliating and exalting, human and
  26. 26. Victorian Tis better to have loved andlost, than to have never loved at all. - Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809- 1883) 26
  27. 27. Victorian During the Victorian Era (1837-1901), romantic love became viewed as the primary requirement for marriage and courting became even more formal - almost an art form among the upper classes. An interested gentleman could not simply walk up to ayoung lady and begin a conversation. Even after being introduced, it was still some time before it was considered appropriate for a man to speak to a lady or for a couple to be seen together. Once they had been formally introduced, if the gentleman wished to escort the lady home he would present his card to her. At the endof the evening the lady would look over her options and chose who would be her escort. She would notify the lucky gentleman by giving him her own card requesting that he escort her home. Almost all courting took place in the girls home, always under the eye of watchful parents. If the courting progressed, the couplemight advance to the front porch. Smitten couples rarely saw each other without the presence of a chaperone, and marriage proposals were frequently written. 27
  28. 28. Shakespeare“My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love as deep; the more I give to thee, the more I have, for both are infinite. “ - William Shakespeare (1564-1616), "Romeo and Juliet" 28
  29. 29. Romeo and Juliet Romeo and Juliet is atragic tale of two lovers from feuding families who fall in love at first sight, marry and risk it all for love. It was among Shakespeares most popular plays during his lifetime. 29
  30. 30. Love In LiteratureIn the fairytales there is always abeautiful princess looking for loveand a handsome Prince Charmingon a white horse who comes torescue her. He is always tall, darkand handsome, strong and brave.She is always fair with a sweetdisposition. They will fall in love andlive happily ever after in a beautifulcastle in a faraway land. 30
  31. 31. Colonial Times• Women were scare in early America. No women accompanied the settlers who established Jamestown, Virginia in 1607. And when the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1620, only 28 women numbered among the 100 or so passengers on the Mayflower. In a rich new world, marriageable white women remained rare — and eagerly sought. Between 1620 and 1622, about 150 “pure and spotless” women arrived in Virginia and were auctioned for about 80 pounds of tobacco to future husbands. But, by 1625, men still comprised three-quarters of Virginia’s white population, and, by mid-century, the situation had worsened. Eligible ladies obviously remained hard to come by. On the other hand, the free women of 17th- century America found their position enviable. Regardless of looks, wit, or wealth, they had no trouble finding husbands. Many other women came as indentured servants, especially to the Southern colonies. But even they quickly fared well, often marrying the men who bought their contracts. Later, the Southern colonies attracted men with wives and children by basing the size of family land grants on the number of household members. Marriage and the customs surrounding it took various forms in early America. Many of our ancestors followed old English practices — negotiating a dowry, announcing a betrothal, and holding a ceremony. While the English were the largest ethnic group in early America, other groups exerted influence in some locales — among them, the Dutch, in New York and New Jersey; the Swedes, along the Delaware; and the Germans, in Pennsylvania. 31
  32. 32. 1940’s/1950’s 32
  33. 33. 1940’s Life was simple during these times.. Womenstayed home to take care of household chores and the children. World War II spurred enormous changes in family life. 33
  34. 34. 1950’s• How to Have a Happy Husband.• (The following was excerpted from a 1950s high-school, home-economics textbook.)• Have dinner ready, Plan ahead, even the night before, to have a delicious meal - on time. This is a way of letting him know that you have been thinking about him and are concerned about his needs. Most men are hungry when they come home, and the prospect of a good meal is part of this warm welcome needed.• Prepare yourself. Take 15 minutes to rest so that youll be refreshed when he arrives. Touch up your makeup, put a ribbon in your hair and be fresh-looking. He has just been with a lot of work-weary people.• Be a little gay and a little more interesting. His boring day may need a lift.• Clear away the clutter. Make one last trip through the main part of the house just before your husband arrives gathering up school books, toys, paper, etc. Then run a dust cloth over the tables. Light a candle. Your husband will feel he has reached a haven of rest and order, and it will give you a lift, too.• Prepare the children. Take a few minutes to wash the childrens hands and faces (if they are small), comb their hair, and if necessary. change their clothes. They are little treasures and he would like to see them playing the part.• Minimize all noise. At the time of his arrival, eliminate all noise of the washer, dryer, dishwasher or vacuum. Try to encourage the children to be quiet. Better yet, have them in bed.• Be happy to see him. Greet him with a warm smile and be glad to see him.• Some donts: Dont greet him with problems or complaints. Dont complain if hes late for dinner. Just count this as minor compared to what he might have gone through that day.• Make him comfortable. Have him lean back in a comfortable chair or suggest he lie down in the bedroom.• Have a cool or warm drink ready for him. Arrange his pillow and offer to take off his shoes.• Speak in a low, soft soothing and pleasant voice. Allow him to relax and unwind.• Listen to him. You may have a dozen things to tell him - the moment of his arrival is not the time. Let him talk first.• Make the evening his. Never complain if he does not take you out to dinner or to other places of entertainment. Instead, try to understand his world of strain and pressure, his need to be home and relax.• Try to make your home a place of peace and order where your husband can renew himself in body and spirit. 34
  35. 35. Film• "Gone With the Wind" can be identified as one of the immortal pieces of literary works in this world. Margaret Mitchells famous work has chronicled the love and hate relationship between Scarlett OHara and Rhett Butler. Proving that timing is everything, Scarlett OHara and Rhett Butler never seem to be quite in synch. Throughout the epic story, this tempestuous twosome experience passion but not permanence, and their stormy marriage reflects the surrounding Civil War battles. The flirtatious, promiscuous, and perpetually pursued Scarlett cant make up her mind between her many suitors. When she finally decides to settle on being happy with Rhett, her fickle nature has already driven him away. Hope springs eternal in our devious heroine, however, and the novel ends with Scarlett 35
  36. 36. Present Time• The world of dating has changed dramatically since ancient times.• Traditional courting has been replaced with acts such as meeting on the Internet or virtual dating, chatting on-line via instant messaging or e-mail, and sending text messages.• Who knows what the future may hold? 36
  37. 37. References• www.wikipedia.com www.sparknotes.com• www.genealogy.com www.cbsnews.com• www.history.org www.cliffnotes.com• www.ancientgreece.com www.enotes.com• www.history.com• www.scarlettonline.com• www.ancienthistory.about.co m• www.arthistory.sbc.edu• www.arthurian-legend.com• www.bookrags.com 37
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