20110914 ECM Show 2011 Future of Information Management

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This plenary session from the ECM Show 2011 in Sao Paulo Brazil described the future of information management.

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  • 1141 First, - let me start by introducing AIIM….AIIM is non-profit industry association for more intelligent information managementStarted in 1943Have approx 65,000 Associate and professional membersHQ just outside Washington, DC, - where I also live. More then 18,000 professionals have attended the AIIM Certificate programs.More classes will be scheduled, - don’t miss it, learn technologies and best ways to manage content.
  • Last year we said that everything is social. Not only is this still true, but if anything the pace is increasing.
  • Moving into mainstream
  • 1st 3 Q – iPAD scaled 4X as quickly as the iPhoneIn Q4 2010 the number of smart phones and tablets shipped was greater for first time than number of PCsFacebook 662MM users -- +41% Y/Y
  • During my professional lifetime, I have seen at least 4 major enterprise IT transformations, and they seem to be occurring with increasing acceleration. When I first came into the workforce, the enterprise IT norm was centered on mainframe computers focused on batch-processed financial applications. This was the era of Burroughs and Univac and NCR and Control Data and Honeywell. This era was soon eclipsed by the rise of minicomputers.Minis were themselves eclipsed by the PC revolution, stitched together in Local Area Networks. Steroids in the form of the internet changed everything about how we connected PCs together distributed documents and information around our organizations. And then along came Google and our expectations about enterprise IT and simplicity of use morphed once again.
  • During my professional lifetime, I have seen at least 4 major enterprise IT transformations, and they seem to be occurring with increasing acceleration. When I first came into the workforce, the enterprise IT norm was centered on mainframe computers focused on batch-processed financial applications. This was the era of Burroughs and Univac and NCR and Control Data and Honeywell. This era was soon eclipsed by the rise of minicomputers.Minis were themselves eclipsed by the PC revolution, stitched together in Local Area Networks. Steroids in the form of the internet changed everything about how we connected PCs together distributed documents and information around our organizations. And then along came Google and our expectations about enterprise IT and simplicity of use morphed once again.
  • It’s also true that Web 2.0 is profoundly changing the way we work. You can work on a computer at your work, home, or Internet café, a laptop at the airport, a tablet PC at the local starbucks, or on your iPhone in a pub. It generally requires Web access, though even this is starting to change, but the tools are lightweight enough and the computers are both mobile enough and powerful enough to let you “work where you want, when you want, and be able to conduct real business.“[twitter]Web 2.0:work where you want, when you want, and be able to conduct real business. – blognation Canada[/twitter]
  • 350,000 apps in the iStoreOver 10 billion downloads
  • 1544 One of the most famous cases studies of Emergence is the beginning of Intellipedia. Now this has led to an entire suite of collaborative tools behind the firewall. Led by champions Don Burke, Sean Dennehy, and Andrea Baker of the Intellipedia Development cell. Social Business tools were brought in for testing in quick and short pilots: urls were shared with test users and programs either stuck or failed-fast. Today the tool set available to users is not as wide as it is on the open net, but it is focused based on best use cases and adoption by the internal community. Tools are inter-connected and a single sign on is available.
  • Here’s a very succinct Twitter policy from a blog by an HR-focused law firm, GruntledEmployees.com. “Our Twitter policy: Be professional, kind, discreet, authentic. Represent us well. Remember that you can’t control it once you hit “update.””
  • ClassificationWorkflow
  • 20110914 ECM Show 2011 Future of Information Management

    1. 1. The Future of Information Management 20118 Trends That Will Change the Way You Manage Information<br />Jesse Wilkins, CRM<br />September 14, 2011<br />
    2. 2. www.aiim.org<br />
    3. 3. Jesse Wilkins, CRM<br />Director, Systems of Engagement, AIIM<br />Background in electronic records management, email management, ECM, and social technologies<br />Director, ARMA International Board of Directors (2007-2010)<br />Frequent industry speaker and author<br />AIIM ERM and E2.0 Expert Blogger<br />Instructor for AIIM Certificate Programs<br />
    4. 4. Agenda<br />Volume, volume, volume<br />Content complexity<br />Commodity computing<br />Social is everything<br />Mobile everywhere<br />Consumer is king<br />Everything old is new again<br />
    5. 5. Volume, Volume, Volume<br />
    6. 6. Volume, c. 2010<br />
    7. 7. It’s only getting worse<br />
    8. 8. Sources: Cisco estimates based on CAIDA publications, Andrew Odlyzko (Wired Magazine, 8/17/2010)<br />
    9. 9. Emergence of “Big Data”<br />Petabytes the norm, exabytes on the way<br />Structured and unstructured<br />Often need to analyze in or near real-time<br />
    10. 10. Content complexity<br />
    11. 11. Rate of technology innovation continues to increase<br />
    12. 12. Content complexity<br />
    13. 13. Content complexity<br />sharing <br />collaborating<br />liking <br />recommending following<br />workflow compliance<br />control<br />security<br />records<br />
    14. 14. Content complexity<br />sharing <br />collaborating<br />liking <br />recommending following<br />workflow compliance<br />control<br />security<br />records<br />
    15. 15. Complex technical environment<br />Enterprise systems<br />Line of business systems<br />Departmental systems<br />Multiple content creation systems<br />Multiple content management systems<br />The cloud<br />Mobile devices<br />Personal mobile devices<br />And on, and on, and on….<br />
    16. 16. Commodity Computing<br />
    17. 17. Basic content services<br />
    18. 18. Interoperability – content model<br />
    19. 19. Interoperability – security<br />
    20. 20. Relatively cheap hardware<br />
    21. 21. Social is Everything<br />
    22. 22. “…fully networked enterprises are not only more likely to be market leaders or to be gaining market share but also use management practices that lead to margins higher than those of companies using the Web in more limited ways…”<br />
    23. 23.
    24. 24. Systems of Record<br />
    25. 25. Systems of Engagement<br />Systems of Record<br />
    26. 26. Is a Facebook “like” a record?<br />
    27. 27. Mancini’s Hierarchy of Information Needs<br />Optimized<br />Engaged<br />Effective<br />Efficient<br />Flexible<br />Aware<br />
    28. 28. MobilE Everywhere<br />
    29. 29. Emergence of powerful mobile devices<br />
    30. 30. And always-on high-speed internet access<br />Air cards<br />Wi-Fi<br />Smart phones with 3G/4G access<br />
    31. 31. Mobile apps<br />
    32. 32. And location-based services<br />
    33. 33. “Working where you want, when you want, <br />and being able to conduct real business.”<br />blognation Canada<br />
    34. 34. 7. Consumer is King<br />
    35. 35. Ease of use<br />
    36. 36. Consumer-driven innovation<br />Free/freemium services<br />App store downloads<br />
    37. 37. Technology touches everyone.<br />Everyone carries technology expectations into the workplace.<br />Why do I feel so powerful as a consumer and so lame as an employee?<br />Photo source = http://www.flickr.com/photos/notionscapital/5225049493/<br />
    38. 38. Enterprise App Store<br />Source: Andrea R Baker<br />
    39. 39. Everything old is new again<br />
    40. 40. Information management is evolving<br />
    41. 41. Policies<br />Our Twitter policy: Be professional, kind, discreet, authentic. Represent us well. Remember that you can’t control it once you hit “update.”<br />
    42. 42. The Need for Content Automation<br />
    43. 43. Considered remedies:<br />87% Social Media Policy<br />86% Employ training<br />85% Capturing confidential data<br />85% Data loss prevention<br />84% Data management technology<br />82% Archive sensitive info<br />Source: Symantec http://bit.ly/niAPxy<br />
    44. 44. Controls<br />Monitoring at the firewall<br />Training is better than control<br />
    45. 45. Systems of Record<br />
    46. 46. Conclusion<br />It’s an interesting time to be in the industry<br />These trends are not on the horizon<br /> – they are here now<br />Organizations need our guidance<br />We have to be ready to lead the information management discussions<br />
    47. 47. For more information<br />Jesse Wilkins, CRM, CDIA+<br />Director, Systems of Engagement<br />AIIM International<br /> +1 (303) 574-0749 direct<br /> jwilkins@aiim.org <br /> http://www.twitter.com/jessewilkins<br /> http://www.linkedin.com/in/jessewilkins<br /> http://www.facebook.com/jessewilkins<br /> http://www.slideshare.net/jessewilkins<br />

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