Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy

412 views

Published on

Critical Pedagogy is as much a political approach as it is an educative one, a social justice movement first, and an educational movement second. Digital technologies have values coded into them in advance. Many tools are good only insofar as they are used. Tools and platforms that do dictate too strongly how we might use them, or ones that remove our agency by covertly reducing us and our work to commodified data, should be rooted out by a Critical Digital Pedagogy.

Published in: Education
  • accessibility Books Library allowing access to top content, including thousands of title from favorite author, plus the ability to read or download a huge selection of books for your pc or smartphone within minutes.........ACCESS WEBSITE Over for All Ebooks ..... (Unlimited) ......................................................................................................................... Download FULL PDF EBOOK here { http://bit.ly/2m6jJ5M } .........................................................................................................................
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy

  1. 1. An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy
  2. 2. Jesse Stommel @Jessifer Sean Michael Morris @Slamteacher
  3. 3. “In the face of stories insisting the future will be automated — that is, in the face of the urgency of machines — Morris and Stommel want us to agitate instead for an urgency of teachers.” ~ Audrey Watters, An Urgency of Teachers: “Foreword”
  4. 4. It is urgent we have teachers, it is urgent we employ them, pay them, support them with adequate resources; but it is also urgency which defines the project of teaching. In a political climate increasingly defined by its obstinacy, lack of criticality, and deflection of fact and care; in a society still divided across lines of race, nationality, religion, gender, sexuality, income, ability, and privilege; in a digital culture shaped by algorithms that neither know nor accurately portray truth, teaching has an important (urgent) role to play.
  5. 5. There never were going to be any dinosaur bones. Critical Pedagogy and the Imagination
  6. 6. Dinosaurs were not a popular subject at my elementary school, and independent study for a fifth grader wasn’t rewarded. My motivations were entirely those of my hungry imagination. For many of today’s students, those dinosaurs of mine are everywhere. In every nook and cranny of their days. And in their back pockets.
  7. 7. We have created best practices “to guard us against the incalculable difference of students.” We have created the learning management system to parse learning into discrete moments and sections, all interrelated through the will and capacity to grade and assess.
  8. 8. Why is imagination important to the project of critical pedagogy? By which, I’m also asking why is imagination important to the project of social justice?
  9. 9. It is imagination that enables us to believe that things can be changed.
  10. 10. “It is a primary purpose of education to deny people the opportunity for feeling bored … The role of the imagination is not to resolve, not to point the way, not to improve. It is to awaken, to disclose the ordinary unseen, unheard, and unexpected.” ~ Maxine Greene, Releasing the Imagination
  11. 11. “Without a minimum of hope,” Freire writes, “we cannot so much as start the struggle.” Is there education without hope? What would be its purpose?
  12. 12. Without imagination, education shrivels to training, which is an occupation without hope, and one which doesn’t even long for hope. Training seeks to maintain the status quo, and assumes that the systems already in place are not only satisfactory, but beyond question.
  13. 13. “Never does an event, a fact, a deed, a gesture of rage or love, a poem, a painting, a song, a book, have only one reason behind it. In fact, a deed, a gesture of rage or love, a poem, a painting, a song, a book are always wrapped in thick wrappers. They have been touched by manifold whys.” ~ Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of Hope
  14. 14. “The difficult task for the teacher is to devise situations in which the young will move from the habitual and ordinary and consciously undertake a search.” ~ Maxine Greene, Releasing the Imagination
  15. 15. When the imagination leads us astray, when it takes us down paths our teachers would not advise we walk, it “poses the issues of decision, of option, of ethics.” Even, says Freire, “of education and its limits.”
  16. 16. “If teaching can be thought of as an address to others’ consciousness, it may be a summons on the part of one incomplete person to other incomplete persons to reach for wholeness.” ~ Maxine Greene, Releasing the Imagination
  17. 17. There might have been dinosaur bones. There didn’t need to be dinosaur bones.
  18. 18. Learning is Not a Mechanism Digital pedagogy is not equivalent to teachers using digital tools. Digital pedagogy demands we think critically about our tools, demands we reflect actively upon our own practice.
  19. 19. The large-format blackboard was first used in the U.S. in 1801. The vacuum tube-based computer was introduced in 1946. In the 1960s, Seymour Papert began teaching the Logo programming language to children. The first Learning Management System, PLATO (Program Logic for Automatic Teaching Operations), was developed in 1960.
  20. 20. After the introduction of the Radio Lecture in the 1930s, Lloyd Allen Cook warned, “This mechanizes education and leaves the local teacher only the tasks of preparing for the broadcast and keeping order in the classroom.”
  21. 21. When I first taught online, I encountered the horror that is the gradebook inside most learning management systems, which reduces students (often color coding them) into mere rows in a spreadsheet.
  22. 22. Learning management systems now offer (or threaten) to automate a process which is, in fact, deeply idiosyncratic. They make grading more efficient, as though efficiency is something we ought to celebrate in teaching and learning.
  23. 23. “Nonconformity on our part was viewed with suspicion, as empty gestures of defiance aimed at masking inferiority or substandard work.” ~ bell hooks, Teaching to Transgress
  24. 24. Both teachers and learners must approach the classroom from a place of flexibility, willing to see the encounters, exchanges, interactions, and relationships that develop in a classroom as dynamic. Grades, and the (very bizarre) notion of their systematized objectivity, stand as an immediate affront to this kind of classroom.
  25. 25. Learning is about sitting (sometimes uncomfortably) with our not knowing.
  26. 26. If there is a better sort of mechanism that we need for the work of digital pedagogy, it is a machine, an algorithm, a platform tuned not for delivering and assessing content, but for helping all of us listen better to students.
  27. 27. “The first paradigm that shaped my pedagogy was the idea that the classroom should be an exciting place, never boring.” ~ bell hooks, Teaching to Transgress
  28. 28. When do we decide that a tool isn’t working, and how can we work together to set it down en masse?
  29. 29. What is Pedagogy? We feel increasingly certain that the word “pedagogy” has been misread — that the project of education has been misdirected — that educators and students alike have found themselves more and more flummoxed by a system that values assessment over engagement, learning management over discovery, content over community, outcomes over epiphanies. Education has misrepresented itself as objective, quantifiable, apolitical.
  30. 30. Pedagogy is praxis, insistently perched at the intersection between the philosophy and the practice of teaching.
  31. 31. What is Critical Pedagogy? Critical Pedagogy suggests a specific kind of anti-capitalist, liberatory praxis. In Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Paulo Freire argues against the banking model, in which education “becomes an act of depositing, in which the students are the depositories and the teacher is the depositor.”
  32. 32. In place of the banking model, Freire advocates for “problem- posing education,” in which a classroom or learning environment becomes a space for asking questions — a space of cognition not information.
  33. 33. “Knowledge emerges only through invention and re-invention, through the restless, impatient, continuing, hopeful inquiry human beings pursue in the world, with the world, and with each other.” ~ Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed
  34. 34. “As a classroom community, our capacity to generate excitement is deeply affected by our interest in one another, in hearing one another’s voices, in recognizing one another’s presence.” ~ bell hooks, Teaching to Transgress
  35. 35. Our work has wondered at the extent to which Critical Pedagogy translates into digital space. Can the necessary reflective dialogue flourish within Web-based tools, social media platforms, or learning management systems? What is digital agency? How can we build platforms that support learning across age, race, culture, ability, geography? What are the specific affordances and limitations of technology toward these ends? What is Critical Digital Pedagogy?
  36. 36. The wondering at these questions is not particularly new. John and Evelyn Dewey write in Schools of To-Morrow, “Unless the mass of workers are to be blind cogs and pinions in the apparatus they employ, they must have some understanding of the physical and social facts behind and ahead of the material and appliances with which they are dealing.”
  37. 37. Digital technologies have values coded into them in advance. Many tools are good only insofar as they are used. Tools and platforms that do dictate too strongly how we might use them, or ones that remove our agency by covertly reducing us and our work to commodified data, should be rooted out by a Critical Digital Pedagogy.
  38. 38. Critical Digital Pedagogy: 1. centers its practice on community and collaboration; 2. must remain open to diverse, international voices, and thus requires invention to reimagine the ways that communication and collaboration happen across cultural and political boundaries; 3. will not, cannot, be defined by a single voice but must gather together a cacophony of voices ; 4. must have use and application outside traditional institutions of education.
  39. 39. Increasingly, the Web is a space of politics, a social space, a professional space, a space of community. And, for better or worse, more and more of our learning is happening there.
  40. 40. For many of us, it is becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish between our real selves and our virtual selves. When we learn online, our feet are still quite literally on ground. When we interact via streaming video, the interaction is nevertheless face-to-face.
  41. 41. Critical Pedagogy is as much a political approach as it is an educative one, a social justice movement first, and an educational movement second.
  42. 42. “If I am not in the world simply to adapt to it, but rather transform it, and if it is not possible to change the world without a certain dream or vision for it, I must make use of every possibility there is not only to speak about my utopia, but also to engage in practices consistent with it.” ~ Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of Indignation

×