The Literacy-Rich Classroom<br />Jessica Crooker<br />Literacy Coach<br />North View Junior High<br />
Guiding questions:<br />Why should literacy be central to our curriculum?<br />How can teachers provide literacy-rich expe...
Why Should Literacy be central to our curriculum?<br />Adora Svitak<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-bjOJzB7LY<br />
Her articulate dialogue?<br />Her confidence in public speaking? <br />Her vast vocabulary?<br />Children grow up to be ad...
Instructional Inventory<br />Brainstorm typical activities in your classroom & assigned as homework<br />Add, if appropria...
Instructional Inventory<br />Two most frequent * (star)<br />Two least frequent – (minus)<br />Which column is more litera...
Reading with a purpose<br />Re-reading for deeper learning<br />Writing to learn<br />Writing: expository, creative, persu...
	“Wise teachers (and coaches and orchestra conductors) do not spend time rehearsing what students, athletes, and musicians...
“Reading, writing, and discussion—these three—are the foundation for a well-equipped mind.”<br />				    (Schmoker, 2006, ...
	“In a recent report, the National Commission on Writing also addresses this concern. They say, ‘If students are to make k...
Traditional uses of Writing<br />Evaluative <br />Evidence of understanding<br />Measurement of what learning has been gai...
Writing to Read<br />Learning driven<br />Exploratory <br />Lower stakes<br />Throughout the learning process<br />Collabo...
Writing to Read<br />
Note Taking & SUmmary<br />
Character Journal<br />As you read the first few pages of Lord of the Flies, write from the perspective of one of the boys...
Opinions – taking a stance<br />Boundary Waters: Cell Phone Tower Debate<br />Take on the identity of one the parties invo...
Identities & Points of View<br />facebook info page <br />facebook status update<br />IM chats<br />Text messages<br />Blo...
“If you want students to dig into the content, take away the constraints of the form. Use a genre they know.” <br />				–D...
What is the role of Language Arts and Social Studies teachers?<br />To accelerate reading growth? <br />To provide opportu...
Benchmark 6.13.10.10<br />	By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 6-8 text compl...
New complexity Demands <br />
Measuring text complexity<br />Levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and    knowledge demand...
Reading Growth<br />Independent level<br />Choice<br />Differentiate<br />Supplement<br />Mirror<br />Standards<br />Grade...
Supporting striving readers in accessing grade-level texts<br />
Regardless of materials…<br />Focus on these five practices of a literacy-rich classroom:<br />Focus on higher level think...
Teacher A<br />MCA/GRAD Reading Test Day<br />10th grade English<br />Dead Poet’s Society<br />No engagement<br />No movie...
	“The value of doing in-class reading, writing, and discussion can’t be overstated…, even an additional 30 minutes of clos...
Resources<br />Graham, S., and Hebert, M. A. (2010). Writing to read: Evidence for how writing can improve reading. A Carn...
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The Literacy-Rich Classroom

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  • You have to start small and not feel the need to throw everything out and start all over. Instead…1.  Higher order talk and writing about text (remember it is not enough to just ask higher order questions, we need to teach students how to give higher order responses).2.  Teaching comprehension and word recognition as strategies not just skills.3.  Using modeling, coaching, and listening and giving feedback more than just telling and recitation (Q-A-Q-A).4.  Having all students be actively engaged (i.e. every single child reading, writing, manipulating, or sharing with a partner) rather than listening or waiting for a turn.5. Telling the students the purpose of the lesson and how it will help them as readers and writers.
  • The Literacy-Rich Classroom

    1. 1. The Literacy-Rich Classroom<br />Jessica Crooker<br />Literacy Coach<br />North View Junior High<br />
    2. 2. Guiding questions:<br />Why should literacy be central to our curriculum?<br />How can teachers provide literacy-rich experiences for their students and teach the standards?<br />What is the role of Language Arts and Social Studies teachers in teaching reading?<br />To accelerate reading growth? <br />To provide opportunities for students to read informational texts and literature within the appropriate grade-level complexity band? <br />
    3. 3. Why Should Literacy be central to our curriculum?<br />Adora Svitak<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-bjOJzB7LY<br />
    4. 4. Her articulate dialogue?<br />Her confidence in public speaking? <br />Her vast vocabulary?<br />Children grow up to be adults?<br />The need to teach children to be better adults than us? <br />Her ability to ask, “why not?”<br />
    5. 5. Instructional Inventory<br />Brainstorm typical activities in your classroom & assigned as homework<br />Add, if appropriate:<br />Reading with a purpose<br />Re-reading for deeper learning<br />Writing to learn<br />Writing: expository, creative, persuasive<br />Thinking analytically, critically<br />Evaluating based on reading or writing<br />Participating in academic discourse<br />
    6. 6. Instructional Inventory<br />Two most frequent * (star)<br />Two least frequent – (minus)<br />Which column is more literacy-rich?<br />Classroom activities<br />Homework <br />
    7. 7. Reading with a purpose<br />Re-reading for deeper learning<br />Writing to learn<br />Writing: expository, creative, persuasive<br />Thinking analytically, critically<br />Evaluating based on reading or writing<br />Participating in academic discourse<br />
    8. 8. “Wise teachers (and coaches and orchestra conductors) do not spend time rehearsing what students, athletes, and musicians can already do well – they invest precious practice time on activities that are challenging and difficult.”<br /> (Reeves, 2010)<br />
    9. 9. “Reading, writing, and discussion—these three—are the foundation for a well-equipped mind.”<br /> (Schmoker, 2006, p. 72)<br />
    10. 10. “In a recent report, the National Commission on Writing also addresses this concern. They say, ‘If students are to make knowledge their own, they must struggle with the details, wrestle with the facts, and rework raw information and dimly understood concepts into language they can communicate to someone else. In short, if students are to learn, they must write.’”<br /> Carnegie Corporation Writing to Read<br /> (Graham & Hebert, 2010)<br />
    11. 11. Traditional uses of Writing<br />Evaluative <br />Evidence of understanding<br />Measurement of what learning has been gained<br />High-stakes <br />Summative<br />End of unit<br />Individualistic <br />Not shared<br />Limited in genre<br /> essay, academic in nature<br />
    12. 12. Writing to Read<br />Learning driven<br />Exploratory <br />Lower stakes<br />Throughout the learning process<br />Collaborative<br />Interactive<br />Shared, discussed<br />Flexible genres<br />“If you want students to dig into the content, take away the constraints of the form. Use a genre they know.” –Dr. Chris Anson, North Carolina State University<br />(C. Anson, personal communication, April 30, 2011)<br />
    13. 13. Writing to Read<br />
    14. 14. Note Taking & SUmmary<br />
    15. 15. Character Journal<br />As you read the first few pages of Lord of the Flies, write from the perspective of one of the boys. Include what you see, think, and feel. <br />Discuss the details that seem especially important considering you are stranded on this strange island?<br />
    16. 16. Opinions – taking a stance<br />Boundary Waters: Cell Phone Tower Debate<br />Take on the identity of one the parties involved in the cell phone tower debate.<br />TWEET a message to your “followers” informing them of your stance on this issue.<br />
    17. 17. Identities & Points of View<br />facebook info page <br />facebook status update<br />IM chats<br />Text messages<br />Blog entries<br />Emails<br />Thank You card<br />
    18. 18. “If you want students to dig into the content, take away the constraints of the form. Use a genre they know.” <br /> –Dr. Chris Anson North Carolina State University<br />(C. Anson, personal communication, April 30, 2011)<br />
    19. 19. What is the role of Language Arts and Social Studies teachers?<br />To accelerate reading growth? <br />To provide opportunities for students to read informational texts and literature within the appropriate grade-level complexity band? <br />
    20. 20. Benchmark 6.13.10.10<br /> By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. <br />Benchmark 8.5.10.10<br /> By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.<br />
    21. 21. New complexity Demands <br />
    22. 22. Measuring text complexity<br />Levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands <br />Readability measures and other scores of text complexity<br />Reader variables (such as motivation, knowledge, and experiences) and task variables (such as purpose and the complexity generated by the task assigned and the questions posed) <br />
    23. 23. Reading Growth<br />Independent level<br />Choice<br />Differentiate<br />Supplement<br />Mirror<br />Standards<br />Grade-level complexity<br />One shared text<br />Ease will vary<br />Likely core text<br />Window<br />What is our goal? What is our role?<br />
    24. 24. Supporting striving readers in accessing grade-level texts<br />
    25. 25. Regardless of materials…<br />Focus on these five practices of a literacy-rich classroom:<br />Focus on higher level thinking<br />Teach word recognition and comprehension as strategies, not simply as skills<br />Use a student support stance (modeling, coaching) towards instruction in addition to a teacher directed stance<br />Have students engaged in active vs. passive responses to literacy activities<br />Reflect on the purposes of a lesson: How will my lesson help individual students grow in literacy abilities?<br />(Peterson, 2011)<br />
    26. 26. Teacher A<br />MCA/GRAD Reading Test Day<br />10th grade English<br />Dead Poet’s Society<br />No engagement<br />No movie. Game day.<br />“Regular” English<br />Teacher B<br />MCA/GRAD Reading Test Day<br />10th grade English<br />Dead Poet’s Society<br />Metacognition notes<br />Total engagement<br />Still talking about the movie!<br />“Striving Reader” English<br />
    27. 27. “The value of doing in-class reading, writing, and discussion can’t be overstated…, even an additional 30 minutes of close, purposeful reading followed by regular discussion and writing adds months of growth for each school year.”<br /> (Schmoker, p. 98)<br />
    28. 28. Resources<br />Graham, S., and Hebert, M. A. (2010). Writing to read: Evidence for how writing can improve reading. A Carnegie Corporation Time to Act Report. Washington, DC: Alliance for Excellent Education.<br />Peterson, D. (2011) Developing Effective Teachers of Reading through School-wide Change [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from http://www.cehd.umn.edu/reading/<br />Reeves, D. (2010, Oct. 20). Leading the Change in the Face of Criticism. Retrieved from http://www.leadandlearn.com/blog/2010/10/leading-change-face-criticism<br />Schmoker, M. (2006). Results Now: How we can achieve unprecedented improvements in teaching and learning. Alexandra, Virginia: ASCD.<br />

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