Presents<br />The Art of Making Syrup<br />Member of The Massachusetts Maple Producers Association<br />
Our Sugar Maples<br />The first and most important element in maple syrup making is to have a fine stand of hard maple or ...
Sugar Woods<br />I have spent much time thinning our “Sugar Woods”. Cutting out branches and other species of trees and ma...
Where do we Find Them ?<br />Right in your Backyard<br />	Most syrup in this country comes from the Northeast. Places like...
Tapping<br />Tapping is done around the 3rd week in February. At that time we usually get a few days when the temperature ...
Moving the Sap<br />Nowadays our maple trees are all on sap lines. That is, plastic tubing strung from one tree to another...
Inside the Sugar House<br />Vacuum Pump<br />Creates a vacuum in the tubing system which greatly enhances the amounts comi...
The Final Stages<br />Concentration tank<br />The Finishing Pan<br />The syrup now waits till all the sap has turned to sy...
Almost on The Shelf<br />Reheating Process <br />We then reheat the syrup for the last time. Then we transfer it to the va...
Ready for Sale<br />Our Syrup<br />Gallon         $40.00<br />½ Gallon     $28.00<br />Quart          $16.00<br />Pint    ...
Warfield House Innat Valley View Farm<br />Maple Syrup<br />“nectar of the gods”<br />John Warfield Glaze<br />
Warfield House InnatValley View FarmSlide presentation created byjerry gosetti<br />
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Syrup

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Syrup

  1. 1. Presents<br />The Art of Making Syrup<br />Member of The Massachusetts Maple Producers Association<br />
  2. 2. Our Sugar Maples<br />The first and most important element in maple syrup making is to have a fine stand of hard maple or sugar maple trees. Our sugar maples were first developed by my great grandfather, Edward Warfield.<br />
  3. 3. Sugar Woods<br />I have spent much time thinning our “Sugar Woods”. Cutting out branches and other species of trees and making trails through the woods. When the trees are thinned out it is easier to get around when it is time to tap.<br />
  4. 4. Where do we Find Them ?<br />Right in your Backyard<br /> Most syrup in this country comes from the Northeast. Places like Vermont, New Hampshire and our own beloved Massachusetts.<br />Is there some in your yard ?<br /> Well lets check our next group of photos & diagrams to help us find out.<br />Do they have leaves like this ?<br />Does this look familiar ?<br />Are the trunks like this ?<br />If so your on your way to make maple syrup<br />
  5. 5. Tapping<br />Tapping is done around the 3rd week in February. At that time we usually get a few days when the temperature goes up into the 40 degrees during the day<br />Circa 1898 spigot<br />More modern spigot<br />Old hand Drill<br />Tools of the Trade<br />To the left notice the buckets, when filled they needed to be hauled to the sugar house. Today as you see below many sugar farms use a direct line to the sugar house with advent of new and tougher plastics there is no need to worry except for some ornery critters like our friend the ….<br />
  6. 6. Moving the Sap<br />Nowadays our maple trees are all on sap lines. That is, plastic tubing strung from one tree to another. Lets see a diagram with the various sizes.<br />Up till about 1950 we would go up & down the trails with a horse drawn sled with a tank on top of it. We would hire high school boys to take the bucket off the sled and pour the sap into the tank. It was brought down to the sugar house where a pipe was attached and the syrup poured into large tanks.<br />Connects to the Trees<br />3/16” line<br />1/2” line<br />3/4” line<br />1” line<br />To the Sugar House<br />2” base line<br />
  7. 7. Inside the Sugar House<br />Vacuum Pump<br />Creates a vacuum in the tubing system which greatly enhances the amounts coming down from the mountain.<br />When the days warm up to around ????degrees, the pump gets turned on and the sap starts to flow<br />Reverse Osmosis Machine<br />This machine is a sophisticated machine which extracts most of the water from the sap. The leftover sap is what we called “concentrated”.<br />Holding Tank<br />The holding tank is where the raw sap stays till there is enough for it to move on to the osmosis machine.<br />Releaser and pump<br />
  8. 8. The Final Stages<br />Concentration tank<br />The Finishing Pan<br />The syrup now waits till all the sap has turned to syrup. Then it will be re-boiled to a temp of 190 degrees. Then it will be sent over to the filter press.<br />Water holding tank<br />The Evaporator<br />The tank now releases to the evaporator the sap to be boiled. We use wood as our source for heat . We feel it makes a better syrup. <br />The Filter Press<br />The filter press is a filtering system which takes out any impurities that might have slipped through. These impurities are called “niter”.<br />
  9. 9. Almost on The Shelf<br />Reheating Process <br />We then reheat the syrup for the last time. Then we transfer it to the various size containers.<br />5 Gal. Bulk Storage<br />This is where the pure maple syrup is stored till it is ready to be bottled.<br />Grading & Labeling<br />Grading runs from “B” syrup which is dark to a Grade “A” light Amber. Which do you like ???<br />Member of The Massachusetts Maple Producers Association<br />
  10. 10. Ready for Sale<br />Our Syrup<br />Gallon $40.00<br />½ Gallon $28.00<br />Quart $16.00<br />Pint $9.00<br />½ Pt $5.50<br />Mmmm good !!!<br />
  11. 11. Warfield House Innat Valley View Farm<br />Maple Syrup<br />“nectar of the gods”<br />John Warfield Glaze<br />
  12. 12. Warfield House InnatValley View FarmSlide presentation created byjerry gosetti<br />

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