Rent-a-garden in the
21st century
> Nothing new, but different(iated)…
> From philanthropy to partnership

 Jeroen van Sch...
…nothing new                                                 Since 13th century ‘coelghaerden’
The first urban allotment g...
Three kinds of gardens:
Interbellum                                                           A. Kitchen gardens, the smal...
ALLOTMENT-GARDEN PARKS nowadays
                                                               Municipality of Amsterdam

...
The rise of the
                                                                         metropolis…and a new
            ...
from philanthropy …to partnership
  - A strong history of community organisation
  - Allotment garden development hand-in-...
from philanthropy …to partnership
Challenges for associations of gardeners

- Getting recognition as an equal partner for ...
Further reading
Historic studies
Jansen, L. (1968) Oorsprong en ontwikkeling van het volkstuinwezen in Amsterdam. Amsterda...
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Rent-a-garden in the twentieth century

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Presentation for the International Congress on Urban Planning - Amsterdam 2009 - Workshop \'Food and the City\'

www.morgentomorrow.nl

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Rent-a-garden in the twentieth century

  1. 1. Rent-a-garden in the 21st century > Nothing new, but different(iated)… > From philanthropy to partnership Jeroen van Schaick TUDelft & weekend child of the allotment garden j.vanschaick@tudelft.nl Johan van Schaick Former board member ‘Bond van Volkstuinders’ & active gardener vanschaick@planet.nl Harvest in the 1980s…and anno 2009
  2. 2. …nothing new Since 13th century ‘coelghaerden’ The first urban allotment gardens pre-WW I (cabbage gardens) in NL (1910-1913) Allotment parks Tuinwijck (East), Hofwijck (South), Nieuw- Amsterdam (West) 1909-1942 Committee for (location and size on the map are approximations) allotment gardens Amsterdam Elite initiative (national movement since18th century) Social-cultural welfare of citizens Garden-for-the-urbanite During WW I (and later WW II) the management and development of these and other new terrains focused on food security Part of a international movement: - Charitative, utilitarian and recreational gardens - First Dutch allotments 1838 in Franeker - International congresses - Linked to the garden city movement
  3. 3. Three kinds of gardens: Interbellum A. Kitchen gardens, the smallest gardens in which the gardeners The underlying map (1931) is the analysis on which the AUP grow their own vegetables, potatoes and fruits. Only small barns are allowed. (Amsterdam extension plan) is based B. Allotment gardens with a small wooden home without The AUP granted ‘Allotment garden parks’ a separate land use status permission for overnight stay After WW II this led to a shift from land-by-chance to “permanent” C. Allotment gardens with wooden home and permission for locations overnight stay (increasingly done since 1931) 1918 – now Amsterdam Association of Allotment gardeners (BVV) - Prolonging the park-based organisation of gardeners after food crisis of WW I was over and the municipality wanted to stop municipal-garden- exploitation for food production - Looking after interests of gardeners, e.g. in light of urbanization (e.g. in relation to municipality and other land owners) - Propaganda for the relevance to exploit allotment parks - Increasing knowledge of horticulture amongst gardeners 1929 – now National association
  4. 4. ALLOTMENT-GARDEN PARKS nowadays Municipality of Amsterdam 41 parks of which 24 BVV and 16 other clubs/associations (17 parks 6.000 allotment gardens ca. 150 m2 - 400 m2 - kitchen gardens (9x) - gardens with day-time cabin (5x) - gardens with overnight cabin (27x) The map is based on a compilation of data from 2003 and 2006 from the municipality of Amsterdam and Ministerie VROM -
  5. 5. The rise of the metropolis…and a new desire to go back to nature and ‘pure’ food Diversification of users and uses of the allotment garden…trendy! But also just growing food… …and emergence of new organisation forms The map is based on a compilation of municipal data (2003) by Ministerie VROM
  6. 6. from philanthropy …to partnership - A strong history of community organisation - Allotment garden development hand-in-hand with urban development? - Influencing municipal policy (social & urban development) to secure land for gardens by : - partnering up with other stakeholders - raising the degree of organisation amongst gardeners - connecting to grassroot initiatives
  7. 7. from philanthropy …to partnership Challenges for associations of gardeners - Getting recognition as an equal partner for other stakeholders to stand strong in debates with the municipality - From aiming for ‘draagvlak’ (basis for support), to aiming to become a desired partner for municipalities - Scaling up to regional level, while incorporating grass-root initiatives
  8. 8. Further reading Historic studies Jansen, L. (1968) Oorsprong en ontwikkeling van het volkstuinwezen in Amsterdam. Amsterdam: Dienst der Publieke werken van de gemeente Amsterdam/Bond van Volkstuinders Amsterdam. Zantkuijl, F. (1974)Van coelghaerde tot vrijetijdstuin: een empirisch-sociologische studie over het volkstuinwezen. Amsterdam: Algemeen Verbond van Volkstuinders Vereenigingen in Nederland Vermeulen, P. (1980) Enkele aantekeningen over de volkstuin als recreatievorm aan de stedelijke periferie. Amsterdam: Vrije Universiteit Policy studies Amsterdam DRO (2004) Ruimtelijke inventarisatie – Tuinparken Amsterdam. Amstyerdam: Gemeente Amsterdam DRO (2004) Van volkstuincomplex naar tuinpark - Ontwerpverkenningen naar modernisering van volkstuincomplexen in Amsterdam. Amsterdam: Gemeente Amsterdam Vries, S. de & Schöne, M.B. 2004. Volkstuinen in Amsterdam; de sociaal-culturele dimensie. Wageningen, Alterra, Research Instituut voor de Groene Ruimte. Alterra-Document Other: DVD-video World Report Foundation, FAO & ETC “Small urban producers organizations – Key partners for susteainable development (contribution to better cities - successful examples and lessons learned –empowerment)”

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