Differentiated Instruction:
Designing and Managing Respectful Tasks
Today’s Objectives
I will understand that…
• Differentiated instruction is “a systematic approach to
planning curriculum a...
Today’s Agenda
• Define Differentiation
• Review a KUD Statement
• Define Respectful Tasks
• Share Examples of Respectful ...
Differentiated Instruction: Review
• Differentiated instruction is “a systematic
approach to planning curriculum and instr...
Carol Ann Tomlinson
(2006)
Product
Differentiation
Is a teacher's response to learner’s need
Respectful tasks Continual as...
Differentiated Instruction :
Ways to Implement
1.Learning centers
2.Tiered assignments
3.R.A.F.T.’s
4.Choice boards (Tic-t...
Is it Differentiated Instruction or NOT?
If you think YES: Snap your fingers
If you think NO: Stomp your foot
• Allowing s...
K U D’s: NECESSARY for Differentiation!
Are written for an instructional unit
•A unit will have many K’s & D’s
•A unit wil...
KUD: Know, Understand, & Do
Respectful Tasks
• Respectful tasks are purposeful tasks or
activities (for each student) that are
aligned to the essentia...
Respectful Tasks are…
• Curriculum Based
• Different…not more or
less
• Equally active
• Relevant
• Equally interesting an...
Respectful Tasks- Nonnegotiables
• You are part of our group.
• You will be thinking and problem
solving at a high level.
...
Are These Respectful Tasks?
STRUGGLING
LEARNERS:
Complete the packet of
worksheets on risky
situations. You may
choose to ...
Are These Respectful Tasks?
• Reflection of Chocolate example
• Was YOUR task…
– Curriculum Based?
– Different…not more or...
Respectful Tasks
•“Every student
should be a little bit
stressed out.”
• Chad Prather, 2013
(Social Studies teacher, ASCD ...
Respectful Tasks- Do’s
• Give students different work
• Provide choice
• Ensure work is engaging and
appropriately challen...
Respectful Tasks- LTHS example
Thanks to Anuja Ashar for sharing!
Students were placed in tiered groups after an exit slip...
Respectful Tasks- Tiered Example
Thanks to Jennifer Setzke for sharing!
After the lesson, students were placed in groups b...
Respectful Tasks- Tiered Example
After reading the exit slips, students were placed into the first two groups.
Group 2 (On...
Grading: Thoughts to consider
Current research is making us
challenge the traditional
ways of grading.
Grading: Thoughts to consider
Principles of Grading in a
Differentiated Classroom:
Tomlinson
– Clearly communicates
standa...
Grading
• Preassessments
– You would most likely never grade
– Where your students are today.
• Formative Assessments
– Of...
Grading
• Humanities Model
• Rubrics
• Sometimes you just need
points
Most important,
remember to EVALUATE
the K U D, not ...
Now it is your Turn
1. Use the KUD you brought or write one for
your next unit. (Template in packet!)
2. Describe a respec...
Today’s Objectives- Thumbs up or down?
I now understand that…
• Differentiated instruction is “a systematic approach to
pl...
What’s Next??
•LLR’s
•Formative Assessment
References
Kumpost, J. N. (2009). Understanding the “understands” in
KUDS . www.differentiationcentral.com Vol 1, Issue 1,...
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DI: Designing and Managing Respectful Tasks

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  • Opener…NO Slide…Jack will make worksheetsOpener- Chocolate (Make KUD-buy chocolate)Group 1: Write the word chocolate 6 times. Draw a picture of chocolate. Do you like chocolate? Circle Y/N. Do you like more than one kind of chocolate? Circle Y/N. What is your favorite kind of chocolate? Where does chocolate come from? Group 2: Make a list of descriptive, sensory and/or comparative words to describe your chocolate. Make another list of everything you can do with chocolate.Group 3: Read this article and make a summary outline to share the important information. Group 4: Create 3 similes to help someone else understand how you feel about chocolate. *Reminder: similes make a direct comparison of two unlike things using “like” or “as.”* *We will reflect and come back to this as we discuss respectful tasks*
  • Just read
  • Just read
  • ONLY Read definition
  • Again-just emphasize that many teachers are already implementing these strategies—now our job is to make sure we are structuring them with a KUD in mind for true differentiation
  • Allowing students: YES (DI by learning profile)Trails: YES (DI by interest and readiness)Random groups: NO (nothing created for interest or readiness or LP if all same reading/questions)Chores: YES (DI by interest and readiness)Changing activities: NO-movement and activities don’t make it differentiated.
  • Don’t need a KUD for every lesson! KUD’s MUST come first…we get caught up in creating these amazing activities…but then we try to fit it in backwards. We lose sight of what EACH student should be learning/understanding/doing and focus on product—this is when we accidentally give disrespectful tasks.
  • You (probably) already have the U and the D from all of your PLC and team work! The U are the EU’s—just need to make sure you have the word “that” in it to make sure it is a big idea and not a “Do”The “Do’s” should come from your Essential outcomes. They typically have an observable verb attached. Do’s are real world, what can they do, NOT the daily task.All the “stuff” they need to get to get toward that U and D goes into the Know category.
  • This is our focus for today-one of the principals of DI
  • Give list, spinoff with an example if it fits.Those of you using the MAP test, teaching up addresses the zone of proximal development (what they know now vs. where we need them to get to)
  • We’re all studying the most important ideas- everyone of us should master those: you are a part of our group.2. You can’t master important things without using your brain, so everyone in this class will be thinking and problem solving at a high level.3. I want this task to be so interesting to you that it’s hard for you to disregard it- even if you don’t think you wanted to learn today.
  • Are these equal, fair, exciting, engaging?Why or why not?
  • What was our KUD?Was that clear to everyone?This was a very important concept to start with to express the point that it is so important to have a clear KUD because it is virtually impossible to create a respectful task unless you know that all students have the same end goal. Many of us our working on group activities and varieties of learning, however, that is not true differentiation.If most students are picking the same option, there is a chance that the tasks are not al respectful (one is easier than another, or one is more fun).Put yourself in their shoes…how does it feel?
  • This is one way to know that you are trying to “teach up.” Each task should be a bit harder for each student than where they are “today.” That place is different for them, however, so we can’t and shouldn’t teach the same thing the same way to each of our different students. Most of them will not be stressed out enough 
  • Give students different work that matches their readiness, interest and/or learning profilesProvide choice to all students whenever possiblePut yourself in the shoes of your students to ensure work is of high-interest, engaging and appropriately challengingProvide appropriate scaffoldingMatch learning styles with interestPractice flexible grouping in all areas of DI
  • This is a great example of a tiered task that can be modified for almost any subject area/content area. We all have vocabulary or terms to teach the students. Once you know there are some that need more practice and some that know the words really well, you can have an activity like this that allows each to practice the skill where it is “just hard enough” to push them. This can also be used as a reteaching activity to allow some students to retake a test for a better grade to demonstrate growth.
  • Another example of a tiered task, but this time, about specific content (again-we all have specific facts/info that we need them to “know.”)-quick example/reminder of how easy it is to use a small exit slip to gauge understanding.Here was her original plan…but…none of the kids ended up providing 2 correct examples.
  • So she adapted on the fly and stuck to the first two groups only. She gave some instructions to group 2 and they ended up working fairly independently while she retaught to group 1. They ended up back together in a full class discussion.
  • Clearly communicates Standards: These are Your EU’s and EO’s-the students should know what you are using to create the lesson, activity, etc. Delineates Separate grades:for growth (changes in learning from the beginning to the end of the instructional component)for achievement relative to standards of performancefor effort-simply trying their best to reach your goal
  • Clearly communicates Standards: These are Your EU’s and EO’s-the students should know what you are using to create the lesson, activity, etc. Delineates Separate grades:for growth (changes in learning from the beginning to the end of the instructional component)for achievement relative to standards of performancefor effort-simply trying their best to reach your goal
  • PreassessmentsYou would most likely never grade Use it to gather baseline data about where your students are today.Formative AssessmentsOften used as practiceOn-going, used to direct instruction (This is where formative assessments can help US-they dictate what we have taught well and what still needs more work; it also lets us see what students need help or enrichment.In theory, rarely gradedBottom line…use professional judgmentOur Assessment team will focus on this throughout the year for us.
  • Humanities: An LTHS example where homework is not graded: It is checked in, collected, entered in IC, etc., but the HW category is weighted at “0”That means you can use it as a conversation piece later (kid gets a D on a test, mom wants to know why, you can go back and show any HW not done or not done well, etc.) and you can use it to demonstrate growth (lots of practice means hopeful growth). If not, then that serves as your starting point for interventions if necessary.Rubrics: Can be--Informal to give feedback regarding quality-Formal with criteria gradation levels based on assessing the KUD-In theory, rubrics for feedback don’t receive grades-more appropriate for a summative after several practice formative assessment opportunitiesRespectful tasks are practice!!
  • DI: Designing and Managing Respectful Tasks

    1. 1. Differentiated Instruction: Designing and Managing Respectful Tasks
    2. 2. Today’s Objectives I will understand that… • Differentiated instruction is “a systematic approach to planning curriculum and instruction for academically diverse learners” that provides students of different abilities, interests or learning needs equally appropriate ways to learn. (Tomlinson & Strickland, p.7) • Respectful tasks are purposeful tasks or activities (for each student) that are aligned to the essential outcomes of the course. • There are a myriad of ways to evaluate respectful tasks.
    3. 3. Today’s Agenda • Define Differentiation • Review a KUD Statement • Define Respectful Tasks • Share Examples of Respectful Tasks • Discuss Grading • Create a Respectful Task for Your Next Unit!
    4. 4. Differentiated Instruction: Review • Differentiated instruction is “a systematic approach to planning curriculum and instruction for academically diverse learners” that provides students of different abilities, interests or learning needs equally appropriate ways to learn. (Tomlinson & Strickland, p.7)
    5. 5. Carol Ann Tomlinson (2006) Product Differentiation Is a teacher's response to learner’s need Respectful tasks Continual assessmentFlexible grouping Teachers can differentiate through Content Process Readiness Interests Learning Profile Through a variety of instructional strategies According to students’
    6. 6. Differentiated Instruction : Ways to Implement 1.Learning centers 2.Tiered assignments 3.R.A.F.T.’s 4.Choice boards (Tic-tac-toe, Bingo) 5.Flexible grouping 6.And so many more
    7. 7. Is it Differentiated Instruction or NOT? If you think YES: Snap your fingers If you think NO: Stomp your foot • Allowing students to choose from three different methods to review for a test • Trails on hikes • Random groups with the same reading and questions • Chores with your kids • Changing activities throughout one class period
    8. 8. K U D’s: NECESSARY for Differentiation! Are written for an instructional unit •A unit will have many K’s & D’s •A unit will have only a few U’s (approx. 1-3) •U’s are likely to repeat themselves from unit to unit
    9. 9. KUD: Know, Understand, & Do
    10. 10. Respectful Tasks • Respectful tasks are purposeful tasks or activities (for each student) that are aligned to the essential outcomes of the course.
    11. 11. Respectful Tasks are… • Curriculum Based • Different…not more or less • Equally active • Relevant • Equally interesting and engaging • Fair in terms of expectations and time • Challenging Always Teaches Up Never Waters Down Defensible Differentiation:
    12. 12. Respectful Tasks- Nonnegotiables • You are part of our group. • You will be thinking and problem solving at a high level. • You will want to learn today.
    13. 13. Are These Respectful Tasks? STRUGGLING LEARNERS: Complete the packet of worksheets on risky situations. You may choose to work with a partner if you like. Check your work with the answer key in the back of the room. ADVANCED LEARNERS: Using flip cameras and your natural brilliance, create a video about handling risky behaviors. This will be presented at the next school assembly!
    14. 14. Are These Respectful Tasks? • Reflection of Chocolate example • Was YOUR task… – Curriculum Based? – Different…not more or less? – Equally active? – Relevant? – Equally interesting and engaging? – Fair in terms of expectations and time? – Challenging?
    15. 15. Respectful Tasks •“Every student should be a little bit stressed out.” • Chad Prather, 2013 (Social Studies teacher, ASCD video)
    16. 16. Respectful Tasks- Do’s • Give students different work • Provide choice • Ensure work is engaging and appropriately challenging • Provide appropriate scaffolding • Match learning styles with interest • Practice flexible grouping – Refer to the detailed Do’s & Don’ts Chart in packet!
    17. 17. Respectful Tasks- LTHS example Thanks to Anuja Ashar for sharing! Students were placed in tiered groups after an exit slip formative assessment about subjunctive verbs. Group 1 (Advanced) Group 2 (On Grade) Group 3 (Below Grade) “Create a REALLY hard multiple-choice test. Write questions that use the subjunctive for each verb; try to trick the class with options they might accidentally choose.” “Write complete and logical sentences for the verbs below. Use a variety of subjunctive phrases.” “For each verb, write the English definition and the present tense yo form. Then complete the sentence, making sure to conjugate the verb in the subjunctive.
    18. 18. Respectful Tasks- Tiered Example Thanks to Jennifer Setzke for sharing! After the lesson, students were placed in groups based onan exit slip that asked them to list examples of methods from both Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. Group 2 (On Grade) Students who provided only one example of each Group 3 (Advanced) Students who provided at least 2 examples Read pages in the book and write the answers to questions regarding differing styles of civil rights leaders in other minority groups. Read an article on a struggle for rights on a current issue, and create an outline that explains two approaches being used in this movement. Group 1 (below grade) Students who “flip- flopped” the examples Complete a graphic organizer to help understand the similarities and differences between the two leaders So… what happens when your “plan” doesn’t work after reading the exit slips?!
    19. 19. Respectful Tasks- Tiered Example After reading the exit slips, students were placed into the first two groups. Group 2 (On Grade) Students who provided only one example of each “Read pages in the book and write the answers to questions regarding differing styles of civil rights leaders in other minority groups.” Group 1 (below grade) Students who “flip-flopped” the examples “Complete a graphic organizer to help understand the similarities and differences between the two leaders” “Activity ended with a productive, full class discussion. Students were engaged, and they were able to discuss concepts that were not all that familiar to them . Overall grades on the summative assessment in this unit were pretty good!”
    20. 20. Grading: Thoughts to consider Current research is making us challenge the traditional ways of grading.
    21. 21. Grading: Thoughts to consider Principles of Grading in a Differentiated Classroom: Tomlinson – Clearly communicates standards – Clearly delineates separate grades  for growth  for achievement  for effort  Provides full disclosure to all
    22. 22. Grading • Preassessments – You would most likely never grade – Where your students are today. • Formative Assessments – Often used as practice – On-going, used to direct instruction More on this from our Assessment Team soon!
    23. 23. Grading • Humanities Model • Rubrics • Sometimes you just need points Most important, remember to EVALUATE the K U D, not the task!
    24. 24. Now it is your Turn 1. Use the KUD you brought or write one for your next unit. (Template in packet!) 2. Describe a respectful task you may use (DI by interest, learning profile, or readiness?). 3. Consider HOW or IF you will grade the activity. 4. If time permits, we may ask for a volunteer to share.
    25. 25. Today’s Objectives- Thumbs up or down? I now understand that… • Differentiated instruction is “a systematic approach to planning curriculum and instruction for academically diverse learners” that provides students of different abilities, interests or learning needs equally appropriate ways to learn. (Tomlinson & Strickland, p.7) • Respectful tasks are purposeful tasks or activities (for each student) that are aligned to the essential outcomes of the course. • There are a myriad of ways to evaluate respectful tasks.
    26. 26. What’s Next?? •LLR’s •Formative Assessment
    27. 27. References Kumpost, J. N. (2009). Understanding the “understands” in KUDS . www.differentiationcentral.com Vol 1, Issue 1, 1. Strickland, C.A. (2011). Differentiation of instruction at the high school level. ASCD: Alexandria, Virginia. Tomlinson, C.A. & Strickland, C. A. (2005). Differentiation in practice: A resource guide for differentiating curriculum – Grades 9-12. ASCD: Alexandria, Virginia. (2007). Tools for high quality: Differentiated instruction. ASCD, 12. (2012). LTHS professional learning communities glossary. LTHS: LaGrange, IL.
    28. 28. Template Provided By www.animationfactory.com 500,000 Downloadable PowerPoint Templates, Animated Clip Art, Backgrounds and Videos

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