Facebook, Twitter and iPhones<br />How Social Networking and Mobile TechnologiesImprove Learning and Prepare Students for ...
How Times are Changing<br />
Digital Natives and Immigrants<br />No, not really.  Not yet.<br />
Web 2.0 in Education<br /><ul><li>Presence
User-generated content
Modification
Social participation</li></ul>(Web 2.0 for Schools, Davies and Merchant, 2009)<br />
Wikis as an Example of Attitudes Toward Technology<br />Jazz in the Harlem Renaissance<br />http://1000names.wikispaces.co...
FacebookIt’s not just for college students anymore<br />
But what do they know?<br />Typing<br />Cell phones<br />Using the internet.  <br />We teach them how to critique it.<br /...
So what do we do if they know this?<br />Use computers in class<br />Access content.  (Are textbooks needed?)<br />Send te...
Assess with Open Book Tests<br />“In the confusion about learning objectives which tend to be stated rather factually…, th...
What they know:  Wikipedia<br />Wikipedia<br />
Famous Speeches<br />Classic Documentaries<br />How-to Skills<br />Student generated content: “Why Recycle”<br />Documenta...
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  • Why educational technology is important and why it’s crucial we expose students to new technologies.
  • From document to 3 hours on my cellphoneIshowed this video for so many reasons. One, that’s just one example of millions of examples of the wealth of materials on YouTube. The video was made by an Anthropology professor named Michael Wesch at Kansas State University and works with his students in collaborative class projects as described in the video. Students are using these technologies. We are distancing ourselves from there as teachers if we don’t use them
  • So many problems—students don’t really know all technologies—just what they use. They don’t really think differently. And it’s a bit insulting to people like you and me—we aren’t necessarily so bad at technology.Artificial barriers.But, I can’t help thinking there’s something here. 2 year olds might be more attuned to technology-all the more reason why we need to learn it now.
  • What are the main technologies we can use. Facebook, Amazon (have you read the reviews/written a review). Written a comment after a news article.Avatar (info)Can modify what you’ve put up/changed and mash upTwo things to consider: the online identity is important, it’s not just a place to “put stuff”. Making use of that, and being aware of that, has meaning—we’ll see some examples in a couple of minutes. This also points to a consideration of the public nature of work. Microsoft Word is technology, and a good one at that. But this nature that student’s work can be for more than the teacher and a grade—that it can be for a larger audience gives a voice and meaning to their projects.
  • Let’s say with a wiki. What it is.“I don’t need it! Let them just write papers.”“I can use it to have them write papers online!” Just write a paper. “I’ve found a whole new approach to the topic with technology!”Multimedia. Make an argument by organizing videos they find online-make it multimedia. Collaborative. Small groups. One grade. Encourage responsibility for each other’s efforts. Put it online. One you have to have them collectively own it—one grade—Depending on the assignment: a paper, you may have to keep the groups small, to avoid diffusion of responsibility (other times--if it’s collecting quotes or ideas—a large group works great). You also have to speak about the advantages of editing each other’s work—explain the benefits. Collect charts, brainstormThirdly, and I’ll explore this more later—you need to think about the public nature of the assignments.
  • Why facebook? It’s where students are. No more than 1-2 students per class don’t have an account, and usually, they did and just didn’t like it. It’s how people communicate, through messaging or status lines and the news feed. How many people here have accounts?Each person has an account, lists what they want, but can their feelings, scientific discoveries, little editorials, where to meet after work for a beer.Meet up with new friends, old friends, colleagues. But students, use it and can monitor it all day. There’s been talk of “this is their’s” the CREEPY TREEHOUSE EFFECT. Some students “friend” students, many do not. But there are groups in Facebook that people can share ideas without “friending someone”—collective meeting places. I’ve used this in classes, and students generally thought it was a convenient way for me to disseminate knowledge. Digital media
  • Get info for a friend—rather than taking notes, just videotaped the lecture for the student
  • Do you need textbooks
  • Besides licensing, can just look it up.You remember through practical repetition sort of automatically
  • How do you use it? There can be inaccuracies, but not many.Nature found just eight serious errors, such as general misunderstandings of vital concepts, in the articles. Of those, four came from each site. They did, however, discover a series of factual errors, omissions or misleading statements. All told, Wikipedia had 162 such problems, while Britannica had 123.That averages out to 2.92 mistakes per article for Britannica and 3.86 for Wikipedia.It’s interesting for students to update it—and use it to find other sources, and general background-definitions (that must be validated)What every you are writing about, getting them to submit to wikipedia can be useful
  • Student generated content---and the documentary film class—it’s so much more interesting, engaging, motivating, and scary to put it online
  • Second Life: tons of educational uses: almost any field. For English, students are recreating scenes from famous novels for roleplay. SL has its own monetary system and an exchange rate with the US dollar-so people can make real money and people start businesses in SL. For chemistry, you can create avatar-sized worlds of molecules. For math, you can program (using Linden Scripting Language) ability to try out equations.Twitter: Just explain how it works. How it can be used in education. BackchannelNing: is like an enclosed Facebook. It goes against some of what we talked about in terms of openness-sort of--but it’s fantastic for some tasks. You can make your own social network about anything, You get a discussion board, blog, ability to post photos, videos, have events, for a group of people about anything. We have a Fisher Reading Group.
  • Geotaggin:GPS Students explore historicalneighborhood, as they walk around, the mobile device works as a kind of compass, giving them clues and leading them to the next exampleSmart objectsObjects can be connected to the computer. You could tag archeological objects—or body parts on a skeleton. My kids have a globe which is a simplistic version of this. Another example, the plant that Twitters. What about a chair that told you when to take a break depending on how you sat on it.Medical cadeavors
  • It’s not any one thing, any one technology, but an overall change in culture.We can’t teach everything (every technical thing), but education is still about critical analysis first and then technological facility.Students need digital literacyfor jobs in the 21st Century.Sales/marketing businessCommunicating/interpersonal and interdepartentalinterofficeEven interviewingEmbracing technology as part of our culture (including education and work)Sharing and collaboratingThese kids know the technology, they need us to know it, so we can help them learn to use it right. As teachers, that’s our job. Thank you very much.Now, it’s my pleasure to introduce Mark Rice, head of the American Studies program, who is going to talk to you about his experiences using blogging in the classroom.
  • Facebook Twitter Iphones

    1. 1. Facebook, Twitter and iPhones<br />How Social Networking and Mobile TechnologiesImprove Learning and Prepare Students for Careers in the 21st Century<br />
    2. 2. How Times are Changing<br />
    3. 3. Digital Natives and Immigrants<br />No, not really. Not yet.<br />
    4. 4. Web 2.0 in Education<br /><ul><li>Presence
    5. 5. User-generated content
    6. 6. Modification
    7. 7. Social participation</li></ul>(Web 2.0 for Schools, Davies and Merchant, 2009)<br />
    8. 8. Wikis as an Example of Attitudes Toward Technology<br />Jazz in the Harlem Renaissance<br />http://1000names.wikispaces.com/<br />
    9. 9. FacebookIt’s not just for college students anymore<br />
    10. 10. But what do they know?<br />Typing<br />Cell phones<br />Using the internet. <br />We teach them how to critique it.<br />Photography by Martini Captures <br />
    11. 11. So what do we do if they know this?<br />Use computers in class<br />Access content. (Are textbooks needed?)<br />Send texts for general communication<br />Text in class (backchannels)<br />And…<br />
    12. 12. Assess with Open Book Tests<br />“In the confusion about learning objectives which tend to be stated rather factually…, there is always the underlying hope that the student might come away from the experience being able to do something he couldn’t do before. No one is interested in actually having the students spouting X.”<br />What does it mean to be educated in the 21st Century, Open EdTech 2008<br />
    13. 13. What they know: Wikipedia<br />Wikipedia<br />
    14. 14. Famous Speeches<br />Classic Documentaries<br />How-to Skills<br />Student generated content: “Why Recycle”<br />Documentary Film<br />What they know: <br />
    15. 15. What Don’t They Know<br />Twitter<br />Ning<br />
    16. 16. Horizon Report 2009<br />Geotagging<br />Smart Objects<br />
    17. 17. The future is about…<br />

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