New Data on Clinician Learning: What does it mean for your CME Programs

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Research exploring clinician learning is of little value if it is not shared and leveraged broadly by those within the CME community to drive innovation and improve educational planning. This session is moderated by Jeremy C. Lundberg, MSSW, CEO of EthosCE Learning Management System and will introduce three new and emerging data sets that have been collected by Brian S. McGowan, PhD, Chief Learning Officer of ArcheMedEx.com. Dr. McGowan will structure each data set to highlight the problem, the methods of exploration, and the data or conclusion that could be drawn. These new ideas will then be put into the context of the educational planning process with the goal of allowing those within the CME community to effectively leverage these data and lessons to immediately impact their planning processes.

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  • {"9":"Title: Physician Adoption and Use of Social Media to Share Medical Knowledge with Other Physicians\nAuthors: Molly Wasko, PhD; Bryan Vartabedian, MD, FAAP; Robert S. Miller, MD, FACP; Desirae Freiherr, MS; Debi Susalka; Mazi Abdolrasulnia, PhD†; and Brian S. McGowan, PhD†\n† Dr. McGowan and Dr. Abdolrasulnia share senior author responsibilities\nBackground: Recent advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs), especially Web 2.0 technologies, have significantly expanded the ways in which physicians can share medical knowledge with one another. With the growing demand for more meaningful use of IT in healthcare, more research is needed on physician adoption and use of ICTs as collaborative tools to synthesize, share and contribute knowledge.\nObjectives: The objectives of this research were to (1) study the adoption and use of 13 of the most commonly used ICT applications to share medical knowledge with other physicians (texting, email, podcasting, blogs, wikis, RSS feeds, cell phone apps, iTunes, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube and restricted online communities (e.g. SERMO)); (2) compare the number of users who claim that they “Will Never Use” these ICTs with the number of users that are “Current Users”; and (3) examine whether there are important differences between two physician practices: oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs).\nMethods: We surveyed 491* practicing clinicians across the United States: 191 oncologists and 300 PCPs. The survey was designed to capture data about the distribution of physicians currently using the different types of technologies and to assess physicians’ intentions to adopt the technologies by non-users. The percentage of physicians across the categories were assessed (not aware of this application, will never use, unlikely to use within 3 months, not sure, likely to use within 3 months, very likely to use within 3 months, and current user). Comparisons across technologies, and between oncologists and PCPs were examined.\nResults: A total of 491 (27%) of 1800 eligible participants responded. Respondents were least likely to be aware of RSS feeds (22%) and LinkedIn (14.3%). Email is the most widely used (70.5%), followed by restricted online communities (51.5%), texting (39.5%) and cell phone apps (35.6%). The technologies with the lowest percentage of adoption were RSS feeds (5.5%), Twitter (6.7%), LinkedIn (10.4%) and blogs (10.6%). In terms of non-adoption, physicians responded that they will never adopt Twitter (32.6%), Facebook (21%), blogs (21%) and YouTube (20.8%). Only 1% of physicians claim they will never use email. Restricted online communities, such as SERMO, have widespread awareness and usage among physicians. In comparing oncologists with PCPs, overall, PCPs were less likely to be non-adopters across all technologies. Oncologists who have already adopted the technology were more likely than PCPs to adopt email, podcasting, texting, restricted online communities, RSS feeds and cell phone apps. PCPs were more likely to have adopted YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn, iTunes, Wikis, Facebook and blogs. \nThis suggests that PCPs have been earlier adopters of social media technologies, while oncologists have been earlier adopters of more traditional, uni-directional communication technologies. While Twitter adoption was lowest and had the highest physician skepticism, the 6.7% adoption rate is not that different from the current percentage of US adults who have adopted Twitter (8.7%). \nConclusions: \nPhysician adoption of different ICTs varies widely and appears to covary with type of practice, with PCPs being more open to new technologies in general, and more likely to use technologies typically referred to as “social media.” Oncologists were more skeptical adopters overall, but were more likely to have adopted technologies used for knowledge dissemination/broadcasting over sharing/collaboration. These technologies have received wider adoption (more users than non-adopters) than social media technologies overall. Healthcare IT systems that incorporate technologies such as email, restricted online communities, cell phone apps, iTunes and wikis may have wider adoption by physicians.\nPCPs are less likely to be technology skeptics. Overall, fewer PCPs reported that they would never adopt a technology than oncologists across all technologies.\nHowever, oncologists who have already adopted the technology were more likely than PCPs to adopt email, podcasting, texting, restricted online communities, RSS feeds and cell phone apps.\nPCPs were more likely to have adopted YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn, iTunes, Wikis, Facebook and blogs, indicating that PCPs have been earlier adopters of social media technologies, while oncologists have been earlier adopters of more traditional, uni-directional communication technologies.\nAlthough Twitter ranked the lowest in terms of adoption, at an overall adoption rate of 6.7% of respondents indicating current users, this is not that much different from the US adult population, which at the time of this study was approximately 8.7%.\nThis study was supported by Pfizer, Inc.\n*Note: 491 respondents included 6 respondents who were classified as “other” based on degree. The “other” category included 5 respondents in the oncology sample and one respondent  in the PCP sample.\n"}
  • New Data on Clinician Learning: What does it mean for your CME Programs

    1. 1. New Data on Clinician Learning: What does it mean for your programs Brian S. McGowan, PhD Co-Founder & Chief Learning Officer brian@ArcheMedX.com Jeremy C. Lundberg, MSSW CEO of EthosCE and Moderator jlundberg@dlc-solutions.com
    2. 2. Today: A Story with Three Acts Review three recent data sets that shed light on how clinicians learn 1. 2. 3. Clinician learning and social media Clinician learning and preferences for CME Clinician learning and the natural learning actions Explore through interview and Q & A how these data may impact your educational programs 2
    3. 3. Act One: Clinician learning and social media How are clinicians leveraging new media in meaningful ways to support their lifelong learning? 3
    4. 4. Act One: Question #1 What percentage of docs are using Twitter as a lifelong learning platform? 1. 7% 2.17% 3.37% 4.57% 5.I have no idea 4
    5. 5. Question #2 What percentage of docs are using restricted online networks as a lifelong learning platform? 1. 1% 2.21% 3.51% 4.71% 5.I have no idea 5
    6. 6. Question #3 What percentage of physicians believe learning through social media could improve the quality of the care they provide? 1. 10% 2.20% 3.40% 4.60% 5.I have no idea 6
    7. 7. Problem: Despite all the recent buzz around the emergence of social media in healthcare, we have little definitive data on ‘meaningful use’ of social media by healthcare professionals… http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
    8. 8. Methods IRB-approved survey: • Developed using theoretical framework, previous literature, and input from advisory board. Surveys were pilot tested using cognitive interview process prior to implementation Distribution: • Surveys were distributed by email to a random selected sample of US oncologists and primary care physicians. Target groups and sample size: • US Oncologists (n=186) & US Primary Care Physicians (n=299) Response Rate: • 485 responses were analyzed for a response rate = 27% http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
    9. 9. Is learning through social media a waste of time or an essential use of time? Primary Care Physicians 18% Oncologists 49% 22% All respondents 45% 20% 0% Waste of time http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/ 33% 33% 47% 20% Neutral 40% 33% 60% 80% Essential use of time 100%
    10. 10. Is social media a source of low quality or high quality information? Primary Care Physicians 17% Oncologists 20% All respondents 50% 18% 0% 52% 28% 51% 20% Low quality http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/ 32% 40% Neutral 31% 60% High quality 80% 100%
    11. 11. Physicians believe learning through social media improves their patient care Using Social Media helps improve the quality of my patient care Using Social Media enables me to care for patients more effectively 7% 8% 6% 17% 6% 11% 5% Using Social Media increases my job productivity 7% Using Social Media improves my job performance 7% 9% 6% 11% 17% 9% 8% Using Social Media enables me to accomplish job tasks more effectively 13% 0% 29% 28% 11% 20% 22% 23% 20% 18% 40% 22% 19% 24% 26% 60% 10% 10% 20% 23% 7% 24% 7% 80% Strongly Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neither Agree or Disagree Somewhat Agree Agree Strongly Agree http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/ 6% 100%
    12. 12. Act Two: Clinician learning and preferences for CME What trends exist in how clinicians expect to participate in CME in 2014? 13
    13. 13. Act Two: Question #4 What are the basic trends in clinician CME preferences? 1. A trend away from live CME Meetings 2.A trend towards (traditional) Online CME 3.A trend towards Online Virtual Course 4.All 5.I of the above have no idea 14
    14. 14. Question #5 What percentage of clinicians believe their participation with online CME will decrease on the next 12 months? 1. 3% 2.13% 3.33% 4.53% 5.I have no idea 15
    15. 15. Problem: Educational designs must include a rationale for delivering content in ways that learners prefer, but we have little comparative evidence to support these planning decisions… http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
    16. 16. Methods Needs Assessment Surveys: • In partnership with AcademicCME, a series of surveys were distributed to a nearly 10,000 subscribers to Elsevier Journals and past participants of Elseviersponsored CE activities • Each survey targeted a unique audience of learners • A core set of questions was carried across all surveys and all audiences • Participation in the surveys was incentivized by Elsevier Sample Size • 801 responses were received across more than a dozen specialties and healthcare professions
    17. 17. Increasing Demand Among Clinicians for Online Learning and Virtual Courses
    18. 18. These trends persist regardless of specialty… 19
    19. 19. These trends persist regardless of practice location 20
    20. 20. Clinicians view live meetings and online CME as distinctly effective
    21. 21. But in a broader sense clinicians seem to feel underwhelmed by CME and other practice support tools 22
    22. 22. Act Three: Clinician learning and the natural learning actions Have we simplified the process of learning such that clinicians can efficiently and effectively learn? 23
    23. 23. Act Three: Question #6 When it comes to the learning overall, what grade would you give your learners? 1. A 2.B 3.C No ‘right’ answer 4.D 5.F 24
    24. 24. Question #7 When it comes to participating in CME, what percentage of physicians identify as 'notetakers'? 1. 15% 2.45% 3.65% 4.85% 5.I have no idea 25
    25. 25. Question #8 What grade would you give yourself when it comes to reflecting and re-exposing yourself to your own learning notes? 1. A 2.B 3.C No ‘right’ answer 4.D 5.F 26
    26. 26. Problem: While educational planners are increasingly leveraging adult learning theory into their planning, they continue to assume learners know how to learn… http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
    27. 27. Methods Semi-structured interviews • More than 200 interview were conducted with clinicians, medical educators, residents, and medical students Interview model • A scenario was designed to understand the process of learning as it relates to engaging with new ideas or practices within the context of a CME activity • Subjects were asked what actions they take in response to new ideas or practices and how they ensure that this new information was transferred to extend their knowledge or impact their practice Qualitative research analyses and conclusions • As themes emerged the interview model was refined and eventually future interviews were used to validate the original themes http://www.jmir.org/2012/5/e117/
    28. 28. Emergence of The Natural Learning Actions 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt Social Four basic learning actions were uncovered Clinician learners acknowledged that learning experiences that failed to support these learning actions were ‘hit or miss at best’ 29
    29. 29. Natural Learning Actions: Note Taking 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt Social 85% of clinician leaners selfidentified as notetakers. Clinicians struggle to overcome a jerryrigged system of notebooks, index cards, post-its, and spare paper/pads. 30
    30. 30. Natural Learning Actions: Reminders 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt Social Clinician learners acknowledged that an inability to reflect on notes and lessons undermines their ability to learn and take action They lack a simplified system for reexposure and reflection 31
    31. 31. Natural Learning Actions: Search 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt Social Clinician learners constantly raise new questions as they engage with the primary lesson content. Searching for new information is distracting given current learning environments. 32
    32. 32. Natural Learning Actions: Social 4 Natural Learning Actions Note Taking Reminders Learning Search Social While engaging with content learners look to others to not only ask questions, but to validate their own learning actions (how/when they take notes, set reminders, and search). This is a subtle new form of social learning. ArcheMedX Blog: http://bit.ly/XKJUpt 33
    33. 33. New Data on Clinician Learning: What’s it mean for your programs By: Brian S. McGowan, PhD Co-Founder & Chief Learning Officer (direct) 267-603-2510 or brian@ArcheMedX.com Questions and Answers

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