Media Research 2014

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Overview social science research methods, as a foundation for studying social media metrics behavioral data.

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Media Research 2014

  1. 1. Media Research Social Science Foundations for Social Media Metrics Jeremy Harris Lipschultz Isaacson Professor UNO Social Media Lab 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 1
  2. 2. Do the data make sense? 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 2
  3. 3. Defining Mass Communication Research  McQuail (1994) says the phrase coined at the end of the 1930s "still has no agreed definition."  Severin and Tankard (1992), treat mass communication as "part skill, part art, and part science."  Mass communication research is the use of research methods to study the flow of information, entertainment, and opinion in society. 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 3
  4. 4. The Mass Communication Research Process  Step 1: Problem & Purpose  Step 2: Literature Review  Step 3: Research Questions  Step 4: Methodology and research design 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 4
  5. 5. Use theory-based RQs 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 5
  6. 6. Theory -> Measurement 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 6
  7. 7. Process (continued)  Step 5: Data Collection  Step 6: Data Analysis and interpretation  Step 7: Presentation of results  Step 8: Follow-up studies 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 7
  8. 8. Research Process 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 8
  9. 9. Variables  A variable is how we observe and measure a concept.  A more precise way to measure, for example the media use concept, would be to create a variable that identifies a specific use of the mass media. 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 9
  10. 10. Levels of measurement  Nominal measurement is the weakest of the four levels. It is a simple classification.  Ordinal measurement refers to ranking.  Both interval and ratio measurement consist of ordinal measurement with equal intervals between scale points.  Ratio measurement has a true zero point. 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 10
  11. 11. All data have error. 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 11
  12. 12. Reliability and validity  Reliability is a measure of consistency.  Assuming that we have established reliability, the more difficult question is whether the measurement has validity.  In other words, has the variable measured what it is supposed to measure? 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 12
  13. 13. Statistical Significance? 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 13
  14. 14. Relationships in Data 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 14
  15. 15. Google Analytics & SEO 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 15
  16. 16. Social Media Metrics 08/29/14 Lecture Notes 16

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