Producción de lana en el flujo de carbono (the land)

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Producción de lana en el flujo de carbono (the land)

  1. 1. Growing wool’s profitabilityDEANNA LUSH08 Jan, 2013 04:00 AMYASS farmer John Ive says woolgrowers should start thinking aboutfuture opportunities in the carbon market and how it could benefit theirproperties.ON-FARM data collection of carbon stocks on woolgrowing properties willunlock productivity gains and help inform ways growers can berecognised for storing carbon on farm.Research by Australian Wool Innovation (AWI) is collecting data as partof a carbon audit of two major Merino production systems: the mixedcropping zone and high rainfall zone.Measurements will be taken mostly in Western Australia and Victoria, withsome also to be taken in parts of NSW.The audit will locate carbon stocks, determine how much carbon is beingbuilt into the system and its movement, called carbon fluxes.The work could lead to wool being part of a “methodology”, a federalgovernment-recognised activity that reduces carbon emissions andgenerates carbon credits under the Carbon Farming Initiative (CFI).
  2. 2. Examples of CFI methodologies include reforestation, forest managementand native forest protection; landfill gas recovery; manure management;management of methane from livestock, and soil carbon and biochar.Work is in the second year and due to finish by the end of 2013.Data collection should be complete in six months.AWI program manager environment, climate change and carbon GusManatsa said the project’s ultimate aim was to improve production andprofitability of woolgrowing systems in a sustainable way.He said the project would also help back-up wool’s claims it was anatural, sustainable fibre, which would inform global markets.“The importance of carbon is that it’s the main foundation of your soil’sproduction system,” Mr Manatsa said.“If you want your soil to be resilient, you have to build your carbon. If yoursoil health is good, your pasture system is good.”AWI has recently been admitted to two government committees run bythe Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency charged withinvestigating possible livestock methodologies.They involve a steering group that is responsible for looking at practicalissues identified in the industry while a working group will look into thehard science.

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