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“  I am often told that I rush ahead to promote things that will only be possible 30 o 40 years from now. But that is not ...
Probable developments in the 21st century Digital era Generalizations Changes produced Education Teaching Promoting IT
Education <ul><li>The new skills required are: </li></ul><ul><li>collaborate with diverse teams of people—face-to-face or ...
Promoting IT <ul><li>Turn schools into dynamic and innovative learning institutes  </li></ul><ul><li>Link students with va...
Teacher Training <ul><li>From individualism to professional community </li></ul><ul><li>From teaching at the center to lea...
<ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge “paradigm shift” </li></ul><ul><li>Have the role of a learning facilitator </...
<ul><li>Should take the responsability of heralding the paradigm shift </li></ul><ul><li>Should formulate a foward-looking...
At the Oceans Learning Center Three Traditional Classrooms Converted To A Learning Center Teaching and Learning in the Edu...
At the Oceans Learning Center Para Professionals
Entry Teachers At the Oceans Learning Center
Master Teachers At the Oceans Learning Center
At the Oceans Learning  Center 1st team What properities make it possible for a plant to live in salt water 2nd team Genet...
<ul><li>It´s not used to sort students acording to their intellectual skill </li></ul><ul><li>Four measures:   </li></ul><...
<ul><li>Recent scholarly work indicates that effective   professional development   has these basic premises :   </li></ul...
Where are we headed?   My intent here is not to predict events per se, but rather to identify  the factors that I believe ...
Structure of the new curriculum <ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Greater depth and less superficial coverage </li></ul></ul></ul></...
Shifts in Practice to Help Students Demonstrate Understanding   Source:  Adapted from Zemelman, Daniels, & Hyde, 1998.   R...
Planning for the future <ul><li>Teacher training and technical support will be at least as important as establishing the t...
New technologies help students  and teachers acquire vital skills and knowledge.  Must be used appropiately It´s a unique ...
“ To see technology as magic and automatically good isn´t any smarter than to see it as automatically evil” Chris Dede  Te...
Who will teach the Teacher? Self-taught Few formal training programs available Solution: Teachers´professional development...
The real power of Technology <ul><li>Makes accesible kinds of content that are crucial to living and working and being a c...
Comparison between New and Traditional Curriculums All subjects separated   Selectively integrated   Integration   Fragmen...
What´s distributed learning?
Education and Training Face to face Traditional distance education Online
<ul><li>Firstly some fact about the UK. Look ath the  On the Line  site and answer the following questions. You will have ...
<ul><li>2) The second exercise involves orientation. You arrive at Heathrow Airport and want to go to London Bridge. Look ...
<ul><li>Family Values </li></ul><ul><li>Before going Online let students discuss the following. How easy do you find it to...
Offline activities Ask students the following questions: Are you surprised by the results or are they what you expected th...
Resources for online teaching www.linguaphone.co.uk National Geographic www. nationalgeographic .com The Discovery Channel...
Windows to the Universe www.windows. ucar . edu How Stuff Works www. howstuffworks .com   The Great Idea Finder www. ideaf...
TIME TO READ   Sherlock Holmes www. sherlockian .net   Harry Potter www.scholastic.com/ harrypotter /home.asp http://www. ...
At the Oceans Learning Center <ul><li>Use of para-professionals </li></ul><ul><li>Division of the task of teaching </li></...
Scenario: Part One As he does every morning, Steve Early eats breakfast in front of the TC (“telecommunications computer”)...
In the project planning room, teachers Valerie Spring, Sharon Gomez, George Shepherd and the five students gather around t...
“ Yea, it might help to look at temperature and pH before and after the spill too,” Steve says. “My mom was a camp volunte...
They decide to first contact the other schools and the scientists to make sure they get the data soon, and make an interac...
Scenario: Part Two Over lunch, Valarie Spring logs into TeachNet, an on-line, nation-wide teacher professional development...
Scenario: Part Three   Several weeks later, Valerie has worked with her colleagues at McAuliffe and Ms. Lucero, the engine...
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Education in a New Era

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Education in a New Era

  1. 1. “ I am often told that I rush ahead to promote things that will only be possible 30 o 40 years from now. But that is not the case, because I commend that which is current and urgent, which already exists in more advanced countries, while my detractors are unaware of such things because unknowingly they are 30 or 50 years behind times.” Bernardo A.Houssay(Nobel Prize for Medicine, 1947)
  2. 2. Probable developments in the 21st century Digital era Generalizations Changes produced Education Teaching Promoting IT
  3. 3. Education <ul><li>The new skills required are: </li></ul><ul><li>collaborate with diverse teams of people—face-to-face or at a distance—to accomplish a task </li></ul><ul><li>create, share, and master knowledge by assessing and filtering quasi-accurate information </li></ul><ul><li>thrive on chaos, that is, to make rapid decisions based on incomplete information to resolve novel dilemmas. </li></ul>Probable developments in the 21st century
  4. 4. Promoting IT <ul><li>Turn schools into dynamic and innovative learning institutes </li></ul><ul><li>Link students with vast network of knowledge and information to enable them to acquire a broad knowledge base and globaloutlook </li></ul><ul><li>Develop in our schools capabilities to process information </li></ul><ul><li>Develop the attitude and capabilities for independant life-long learning </li></ul>Probable developments in the 21st century
  5. 5. Teacher Training <ul><li>From individualism to professional community </li></ul><ul><li>From teaching at the center to learning at the center </li></ul><ul><li>From technical work to inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>From managed work to leadership </li></ul><ul><li>From classroom concerns to whole school concerns </li></ul>Probable developments in the 21st century
  6. 6. <ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge “paradigm shift” </li></ul><ul><li>Have the role of a learning facilitator </li></ul><ul><li>Must become comfortable and habitual to IT uses </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative culture </li></ul><ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><li>Equip with necessary IT equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Take more active role in learning </li></ul><ul><li>Parents </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage and guide their children </li></ul><ul><li>Learn about IT Plan of children school </li></ul><ul><li>Supervise children´s computing activities </li></ul>New Roles
  7. 7. <ul><li>Should take the responsability of heralding the paradigm shift </li></ul><ul><li>Should formulate a foward-looking plan to promote the use of IT </li></ul><ul><li>Must decide on the best timing and mode of procedure, the quality and configuration of IT equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Should seek to increase opportunities for wider access to the IT and motivate teachers and provide an enviroment which values innovation and collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Should take active steps to ensure continuous professional development of teachers. </li></ul>School Heads
  8. 8. At the Oceans Learning Center Three Traditional Classrooms Converted To A Learning Center Teaching and Learning in the Educational Communities of the Future
  9. 9. At the Oceans Learning Center Para Professionals
  10. 10. Entry Teachers At the Oceans Learning Center
  11. 11. Master Teachers At the Oceans Learning Center
  12. 12. At the Oceans Learning Center 1st team What properities make it possible for a plant to live in salt water 2nd team Genetic experiment 3rd team Working on a play
  13. 13. <ul><li>It´s not used to sort students acording to their intellectual skill </li></ul><ul><li>Four measures: </li></ul><ul><li>self-assessment </li></ul><ul><li>community comments </li></ul><ul><li>teacher evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>national school standarizes tests </li></ul>Assessment
  14. 14. <ul><li>Recent scholarly work indicates that effective professional development has these basic premises : </li></ul><ul><li>    Teachers' prior beliefs and experiences affect what they learn. </li></ul><ul><li>     Learning to teach to the new standards is hard and takes time. </li></ul><ul><li>  Content knowledge is key to learning how to teach subject matter so that students understands it. </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge of children, their ideas, and their ways of thinking is crucial to teaching for understanding. </li></ul><ul><li>    Opportunities for analysis and reflection are central to learning to teach </li></ul>Source: (Darling-Hammond & Ball, n.d.).
  15. 15. Where are we headed?   My intent here is not to predict events per se, but rather to identify the factors that I believe will affect assessment in the coming century, and to explore what that impact might be.   What are the factors that will determine the future of educational assessment? Much the same as those that have influenced its developments to this point.         Improvements assessment technology and methodology            Differing views on the nature of learning.            Testing as big as business            Inclusion of all students in testing programs            Competing purposes for assessments.     Add conclusion page 151 and 152    
  16. 16. Structure of the new curriculum <ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Greater depth and less superficial coverage </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on problem solving that requires using learning strategies </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Emphasizes both skills and knowledge of the subjects </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provides for student´s individual differences </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Offers a common core to all students </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Coordinates closely </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Shifts in Practice to Help Students Demonstrate Understanding Source: Adapted from Zemelman, Daniels, & Hyde, 1998. Reliance on teacher descriptions. Reliance on standardized measures. Heterogeneously grouped Tracking and leveling. Higher-order thinking. Rote memorization of facts. Real texts, primary sources. Textbooks and basal readers. Deep study of a few topics. Coverage of curriculum. Demonstration, coaching, mentoring. Transmission of information. Active learning. Worksheets, seatwork. Experiential, hands-on. Whole class, teacher-directed. More Less
  18. 18. Planning for the future <ul><li>Teacher training and technical support will be at least as important as establishing the technology infrastructure. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools should also hire a technology person or teacher to provide ongoing technical support to the school. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers and students should start using the Internet now to become familiar with the technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide email accounts </li></ul><ul><li>Establish a web server at the school </li></ul><ul><li>Install the highest speed Internet connections you can. </li></ul>
  19. 19. New technologies help students and teachers acquire vital skills and knowledge. Must be used appropiately It´s a unique capability for enhancing learning Technology
  20. 20. “ To see technology as magic and automatically good isn´t any smarter than to see it as automatically evil” Chris Dede Technology is not a vitamin, just to sort of put it into schools and then it catalyzes all sort of things. Careful desing has to be made. Implementation project.if people are going to get a benefit out of it. This commensurates the kind of costs and effort that it takes to put it .
  21. 21. Who will teach the Teacher? Self-taught Few formal training programs available Solution: Teachers´professional development compulsory certification of IT
  22. 22. The real power of Technology <ul><li>Makes accesible kinds of content that are crucial to living and working and being a citizen of the 21st century </li></ul><ul><li>It supports pedagogy. The material is mastered, retained and transferred better by most students. </li></ul>The material is mastered, retained and transferred better by most students than when they are put in a situation of teaching by telling and listening. The technology itself doesn´t hav e the power it´s this new kind of pedagogy and new kind of contents that have the power
  23. 23. Comparison between New and Traditional Curriculums All subjects separated Selectively integrated Integration Fragmented Closely coordinated Coordination Curriculum tracks Common core Common Core or Curriculum Tracks Ignored Provided for Individual Differences Overemphasis on knowledge Both emphasized in solving problems Skills and Knowledge Contrived Thinking skills isolated Authentic Contextualized Learning strategies in context Problems Coverage Depth Depth or Coverage TRADITIONAL CURRICULUM NEW CURRICULUM AREA
  24. 24. What´s distributed learning?
  25. 25. Education and Training Face to face Traditional distance education Online
  26. 26. <ul><li>Firstly some fact about the UK. Look ath the On the Line site and answer the following questions. You will have to browsw the site to find information. </li></ul><ul><li>What´s the nation´s current favourite food? </li></ul><ul><li>b) Where is the “home” of the sport golf? </li></ul><ul><li>c)What is the artist Chris Ofill famous for? </li></ul><ul><li>d) What song is sung on New Year´s Eve in the UK? </li></ul>Online activities
  27. 27. <ul><li>2) The second exercise involves orientation. You arrive at Heathrow Airport and want to go to London Bridge. Look at the Tube Map and answer the questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What lines do you need to take to get from Heathrow London Bridge? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Where do you need to change trains? </li></ul><ul><li>3) Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Virginia Woolf </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to the passage and try to answer the questions below. It is not necessary to listen to all of the passage. Stop listening when you have heard enough </li></ul>
  28. 28. <ul><li>Family Values </li></ul><ul><li>Before going Online let students discuss the following. How easy do you find it to communicate with? </li></ul><ul><li>Your Parents? </li></ul><ul><li>Your friends? </li></ul><ul><li>Peope around you? </li></ul><ul><li>Which group of people do you find the easiest and which one the most difficult with and why? </li></ul><ul><li>Online activities </li></ul><ul><li>Let students visit www.queendom.com/tests/index.html . To get to the tests, students should click on Tests”Communication Skills”. Take the test”Go”. Students can then do the test and check their results. </li></ul>Source: Macmillan “i teach” online activities Online activities
  29. 29. Offline activities Ask students the following questions: Are you surprised by the results or are they what you expected them to be like? Do you agree with them? Why? Why not? What does your “family” mean to you? Online activities Students can look at the pictures symbolizing family relationships on this website: www.webshots.com/g/65/677-sh.html and choose the one whic appeals to them the most and say why. Follow-up task Students could write an easy discussing the following problem: How can communication skills influence family relationships? Source: Macmillan “i teach” online activities
  30. 30. Resources for online teaching www.linguaphone.co.uk National Geographic www. nationalgeographic .com The Discovery Channel www. discoverychannel .com Mount Everest www. mnteverest .net www. everestcleanup .com
  31. 31. Windows to the Universe www.windows. ucar . edu How Stuff Works www. howstuffworks .com The Great Idea Finder www. ideafinder .com The Natural History Museum, London www. nhm .ac. uk
  32. 32. TIME TO READ Sherlock Holmes www. sherlockian .net Harry Potter www.scholastic.com/ harrypotter /home.asp http://www. bloomsburymagazine .com/ harrypotter / http://library. thinkquest .org/C006090/ www. azstarnet .com/ harrypotter /library.html http://kids. infoplease . lycos .com/spot/quiz-harrypotter1.html
  33. 33. At the Oceans Learning Center <ul><li>Use of para-professionals </li></ul><ul><li>Division of the task of teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Career path from entry to Master Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom teacher engaged in professional work outside classrooms </li></ul>
  34. 34. Scenario: Part One As he does every morning, Steve Early eats breakfast in front of the TC (“telecommunications computer”). While he watches a news program in one window, his personal communication service relays a video message in another window from his friend, Nelson, who he met at Summer Science Camp. Nelson’s vid - message is about a train derailment on a river upstream from the campground where their school groups stayed. “The train caused a hazardous-fuel spill and now endangers the ecosystem along the river.” Nelson explains. “I am afraid it will poison the water and hurt the animals.” Also concerned, Steve constructs a “scout” agent to search for news clips about the accident, sort them chronologically , and store them on the school server. As he finishes his breakfast, Steve and his parents watch the video that the agent retrieved. At school, Steve meets Carmela and three other members of their Falcon learning team in the playground. This morning they must present an idea for a project to their teaching team. Carmela heard about the spill too, and she and Steve tell the others about it. “I want to find out what can be done to save the animals along the river, and keep the campground safe.” Carmela says. “Let’s ask the teachers if we can figure out how to stop hazardous spills from hurting the environment.” The other students agree.
  35. 35. In the project planning room, teachers Valerie Spring, Sharon Gomez, George Shepherd and the five students gather around the TC and open their project planning tool. Valerie Spring starts off, “OK, let’s fill in the goals for the project. What do you have in mind?” The students chime in with their ideas. “Your ideas sound interesting,” Ms. Spring responds, “but what specifically would you like to accomplish with your project?” “ I think we should come up with ways to clean up the mess,” says Steve. “ One report said the scientists are trying to figure out normal conditions for the river to help them know how serious it is,” another student offers.”Do you think they could use the data we collected at camp? Like water temperature and pH?” “ Good idea,” says Ms. Gomez. Always looking for a way to bring math into the conversation, she asks, “Suppose the scientists know how much spilled. How would you calculate the concentration of the fuel in the river, and if the concentration is safe?” asks Ms. Spring. Carmela puzzles for a moment and then offers, “If you knew the volume of the river you could calculate it. You could test the water to be sure.”
  36. 36. “ Yea, it might help to look at temperature and pH before and after the spill too,” Steve says. “My mom was a camp volunteer, so she has names of other students and schools who were at the camp and would also have data. Maybe she could even be a mentor on our project.” “Let’s email them, and counselors who have lists from other summers. We can collect our observations, notes and pictures from our nature talks, and offer it to the scientists!” Carmela shouts. “Maybe they’ll tell us more about the damage too, and we can figure out ways to clean up the mess together.” Great idea,” says Ms. Spring. “First, let’s plan the project in more detail. Steve, would you like to contact your mother to see if she’d like to work with us on this?” Steve contacts his mother on the TC, and she agrees. Using their software planning tool, the team and Ms. Early work together to plan the project’s organization, timeline, and goals, as well as each student’s learning objectives and tasks. As the discussion progresses, the teachers check the goals that students suggest with those listed in the curriculum. The tool lets them see the skills, activities, and subject matter that past projects have emphasized, and each student’s learning-history profile. The teachers suggest activities that will help the students gain the skills, knowledge, and experiences identified as absent from their profiles. For example, in the planning tool, Ms. Gomez indicates that the new project will help the students strengthen certain mathematical skills and concepts, including measurement of concentrations, graphing number relationships, and making mathematical connections to real-world problems. She also lists scientific models, skills, and concepts appropriate to the project, including thinking critically about the relationships between evidence and explanations, and understanding ecosystems and organisms. Like most of her colleagues, Ms. Gomez has become adept at thinking in terms of broad, ambitious goal statements established by her school and district.  
  37. 37. They decide to first contact the other schools and the scientists to make sure they get the data soon, and make an interactive multimedia report as their final product. “You need to think about your audience for the report,” comments Mr. Shepherd, their language arts teacher, “and what they would want to know about your topic.” They decide to ask Nelson and his schoolmates to collaborate with them by gathering video and other information about the accident, and to assess the spill’s impact and various cleanup methods. They will store their report on the community video server and make it available through the community-access cable channel, and send it the scientists and other schools who contribute data. The report will conclude by taking viewers to the Environment Chat Room on the GlobalNet, where they can talk to scientists, environmentalists, and others about the problem and potential solutions. Each student has an assignment and downloads the project plan into a personal digital assistant (PDA) with a beginning set of pointers to resources. “I think we could really help here,” Steve says. “I can’t wait to tell Nelson.”
  38. 38. Scenario: Part Two Over lunch, Valarie Spring logs into TeachNet, an on-line, nation-wide teacher professional development institute, and enters her virtual office. After reading the messages and fliers stuffed in her door box, she files a position paper that she wrote for an accreditation workshop on Teaching Environmental Awareness in her ÒpublicÓ file cabinet. Using a diagram of the floor plan for the virtual institute, she navigates into the common area, a large space with a community directory, an announcement board, and an event calendar. She consults the community directory to look for a fellow middle-school science teacher, Noriko Miyake, who she met at a workshop several weeks ago. &quot;She usually logs in after school and it's about that time on the east coast,&quot; she thinks. Noriko had mentioned working on a hazardous materials project with her students last year, and she may have some helpful suggestions for her and the Falcon team. After scrolling through several screens of login names (&quot;There must be another brown-bag lunch seminar going on in the conference room!Ó she thinks), she sees that Noriko is in the Planetary Projects Room. She pages Noriko, who invites her to join her, and transports her character there. ÒHi Noriko.Ó Valarie exclaims over the audio channel, ÒDo you have a few moments to chat?Ó ÒSure.Ó Noriko replies. Valarie describes their project, and after a short conversation, Noriko suggests that they look at EnvironModel, a virtual reality simulation environment that she used with her students last semester. Earth Systems Inc. developed the simulation to be used collaboratively by engineers in their home office and environmentalists in the field as they plan quick responses to hazardous spills. They developed a modified version for use by teachers and students. With EnvironModel, learners can walk through and experience first hand a virtual spill site--something unsafe in real life. There's an demonstration version of the software in the Curriculum Resources Room. They transport there, launch the simulation in shared mode, and it appears on both of their screens simultaneously. Noriko opens an example environment, and a 3D rendering of a coastline fuel spill appears on their screens. Norika selects one of the sampling tools and demonstrates how to collect a sample at a particular spot and depth. &quot;This is an important skill, since deciding where and how to sample can vary depending on the type of spill, the environment, and other things. Students learn this by comparing the results they get when they sample in different ways,&quot; Noriko explains. &quot;Once you've assessed the damage, you can select one or a combination of several cleanup methods, like fuel-munching microbes, jellies, or photocatalyst-coated micropheres. Where and how to apply them may depend on additional factors like how to minimally disturb surrounding wildlife during the process,&quot; Noriko adds. ÒThey have some nice support modules and resource materials on GlobalNet that go with it. Earth Systems also has a resident engineer on their Net site who is available to work with teachers and their classes. It’s really a nice service.Ó &quot;This is great! My students are particularly interested in a recent spill on a river that goes by their Science Camp. Are there example river scenarios, or can we create our own?&quot; Valarie asks. &quot;Sure, the software lets you customize environments,&quot; Noriko says. She shows Valarie how to select from a design palette one of several kinds of environments, chemicals, and sampling tools to render customized learning situations. &quot;Sample environments are provided with the software and also contributed by other teachers, so you may find what you need without creating your own, unless you want to,&quot; Noriko points out. &quot;Environments contributed by teachers are kept here in the Example Environments folder, feel free to try some out and contribute your own.&quot; Since Valarie's lunch period is almost over, they agree to meet again later in the week after she has had a chance to explore the simulation and some of the sample environments on her own. Valarie transports to the TeachNet Library to copy a list of environmental project resources for her students. The GlobalNet Science Topic Kiosks , constructed and kept current by the members of TeachNet, are valuable resources for teachers like Valarie. Here she can find more resources that are both Òteacher-testedÓ and mapped onto various State curriculum standards. And, if she needs information that is not in the library, she can consult the librarian or colleagues who are more experienced in the area. The bell rings and Valarie logs off to teach her 6th period class.  
  39. 39. Scenario: Part Three Several weeks later, Valerie has worked with her colleagues at McAuliffe and Ms. Lucero, the engineer who works with schools using EnvironModel, to create a model of the spill. Earth Systems’ western office was grateful for the students’ data, which sped up the analysis and cleanup process. In return, Ms. Lucero is working with the Falcons to assess cleanup methods. During this session, students are coached by Valerie, school-work coordinator Chris Lindsay, and math teacher Sharon Gomez. Chris connects their TC with Ms. Lucero. The students use the school version of EnvironModel, which has the basic features of the professional version but runs on less powerful and less expensive computers than the one in Ms. Lucero’s office. However, the two machines are connected so that the model appears on both screens and can be altered by both the students and Ms. Lucero. The students are wearing special glasses that enhance the 3D lifelike effect of the environment. Ms. Lucero’s image appears on the screen in a small window beside the large window displaying their model. Back in her office, she uses her stylus to select some photocatalyst-covered microspheres from the cleanup palette and sprinkle them on the spill. She speeds up the clock and they all watch as the spheres become coated with the fuel and convert it to carbon dioxide and water. A graph shows how long it takes and how much of the fuel is cleaned up. ÒHow does this compare to other methods you’ve tried?Ó Ms. Lucero asks. ÒYour report should compare methods in terms of disturbance to the wildlife, speed and thoroughness of the cleanup, and cost and ease. You might find that a combination of methods is best.Ó The team discusses these and other issues with Ms. Lucero and the teaching team. At the end of the session, each student uses a PDA to record information and a reflection on the day’s activities in a Òlearning log.Ó Meanwhile, as they work with each learning team, the teachers use their PDAs track new skills the students have demonstrated and their impressions of how well the exercise fosters collaborative skills. ÒOK, team,Ó Ms. Gomez announces, Òeveryone please make a note in your PDAs to show your parents the model and get their comments on relevant factors and ones that we may have overlooked. Remember, part of the scientific process is presenting a coherent argument to your audience and incorporating their input.Ó ÒYou present your report in two weeks, so you should choose an approach by the end of the week,Ó Mr. Lindsay reminds them. ÒRemember, we’ve invited communities near the spill site and schools and families who contributed to watch the report. Ms. Lucero will also be joining us, so you need to be sharp.Ó That evening, Carmela shows her parents their model. ÒI’d like to know more about the animals in the area to help me weigh cost versus thoroughness.Ó Mr. Zamora says. ÒYou’ve shown me information on the kinds of animals, but not on the food chain. If some plants and insects die, could that cause seemingly unaffected animals to die indirectly by starvation?Ó Ms. Zamora reaches for the family PDA and calls up the animal diet database they use at their pet store. ÒLet’s link these data to your classroom database, like this, too.Ó They look over the data and sketch out a food web that Carmela can show her class tomorrow, and incorporate into their report. ÒDad, will you mentor our next project?Ó Carmela asks. ÒThe kids want to learn about reptiles and raise one, and you’ve worked with them at the pet store.Ó ÒSure, let’s send email to your teachers asking how I can help,Ó he says.  

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