Davey Natural Resources Consulting Overview

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Breif description of Davey Resource Group\'s urban forestry and ecological consulting services.

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  • Incorporating natural and green features Rain gardens Green roofs porus pavement bioswales Educational components boardwalks and sinage around wetlands develop outdoor research labs involve students with restoration activities Avoiding natural features such as wetlands and streams helps save costs and delays due to federal and state permitting processes
  • Help to develop site plan: Avoiding natural features such as wetlands and streams helps save costs and delays due to federal and state permitting processes
  • Slope: Steep slopes would be included within the buffers when in close proximity to streams. This situation is most common in headwater streams. Stream Order: Stream order can be used to determine the effectiveness of removing sediments and pollutants. Vegetation: Mature forests with undisturbed understory vegetation will be the preferred buffer vegetation type. Buffers can only be reduced if the current vegetation is mature forest. Mowed and disturbed areas should have the maximum buffer width. Soil Type: Moderate and well drained soils are effective at absorbing surface runoff, while fine-textured soils (usually somewhat poorly drained and poorly drained soils) are better at dentrification. Buffers can be increased or decreased based on soil type and the most important buffer function based on surrounding land use. Dentrification will probably be most important in residential areas with chemcally treated lawns. Adjacent Land Use: Both current and anticipated land use should be considered in determining buffer width and desired buffer functions. Sustainability : Narrow buffers cannot maintain a healthy forest ecosystem.
  • Not too much on the map for Missouri, as you can see. We don’t have the St. Louis project displayed, but it does represent the 1 st STRATUM analysis that I am aware of in Missouri. Transition into discussion on some recent projects assisting with the implementation of STRATUM for municipal clients.
  • Quantifying the need: Street Tree Inventory Completed in August of 2005, the Tree Inventory and Management Plan for Pittsburgh enabled the PSTC and the City Forester to provide meaningful, accurate data for the city’s operational and capital budgeting process. The Inventory also identified and prioritized hazardous street trees, thus enabling the City Forester to proactively assign work plan priorities and reduce the city’s exposure to liability. The action program outlined within the plan calls for an investment of nearly $8 million over seven years to remedy the accumulated backlog of work required to move Forestry Division operations from crisis mode to proactive, sustainable management of Pittsburgh’s street trees. Responding to the Need: Creation of the Friends of the Pittsburgh Urban Forest The Tree Inventory and Management Plan for Pittsburgh provides a clear path to better stewardship of the City’s resources, but one that is beyond the City of Pittsburgh’s current fiscal means. However there is a critical need to act now to implement the recommendations in the plan, especially before additional valuable, mature trees are lost to neglect. Because several potential funders made clear their preference to provide support for this effort through an independent 501(c)(3) organization, the Friends of the Pittsburgh Urban Forest was organized in 2006 to carry out fund-raising, education and stewardship activities that PSTC had coordinated in the past. Moving forward, Friends are working collaboratively with the City of Pittsburgh, community groups, and residents to make a positive impact on our urban forest.
  • 3:1 CBRatio Leverage funding through awareness and advocacy Foster community support Focus management activities to maximize benefits and achieve sustainability
  • This project is a success because of Gene's efforts to integrate the urban forest into the City's overall strategy to achieve the goals of the Mayors Climate Agreement and improve the quality of life in Chattanooga.  Gene is using the STRATUM report and data to better manage public trees to maximize their benefits and help others understand how they contribute to improving the environmental quality of the city. Chattanooga’s stratum analysis contains a lot of valuable benefit information, but the City focused in on its commitment to the Climate Protection Agreement, and thus the contribution of trees to reducing atmospheric carbon. 1,500 trees will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by approximately 141,000 pounds in ten years and by 250,000 pounds in twenty years.   
  • Indiana will be able to take the economic analyses and compare to the structural information. Which communities have more sustainable populations which are in decline, which are on the rise? What is the ideal?
  • 15,002 ash in 2000 inventory (20.3%)
  • 15,002 ash in 2000 inventory (20.3%)
  • Maximize Benefits via: Expanded planting program focusing on underutilized, good performers Set canopy cover increase goals, focus on increasing canopy cover in wards with less trees or smaller trees Maintain mature trees, they are worth it. Plant more than you remove (achieve an uneven distribution in age) Prepare for EAB
  • Quantifying the need: Street Tree Inventory Completed in August of 2005, the Tree Inventory and Management Plan for Pittsburgh enabled the PSTC and the City Forester to provide meaningful, accurate data for the city’s operational and capital budgeting process. The Inventory also identified and prioritized hazardous street trees, thus enabling the City Forester to proactively assign work plan priorities and reduce the city’s exposure to liability. The action program outlined within the plan calls for an investment of nearly $8 million over seven years to remedy the accumulated backlog of work required to move Forestry Division operations from crisis mode to proactive, sustainable management of Pittsburgh’s street trees. Responding to the Need: Creation of the Friends of the Pittsburgh Urban Forest The Tree Inventory and Management Plan for Pittsburgh provides a clear path to better stewardship of the City’s resources, but one that is beyond the City of Pittsburgh’s current fiscal means. However there is a critical need to act now to implement the recommendations in the plan, especially before additional valuable, mature trees are lost to neglect. Because several potential funders made clear their preference to provide support for this effort through an independent 501(c)(3) organization, the Friends of the Pittsburgh Urban Forest was organized in 2006 to carry out fund-raising, education and stewardship activities that PSTC had coordinated in the past. Moving forward, Friends are working collaboratively with the City of Pittsburgh, community groups, and residents to make a positive impact on our urban forest.
  • Davey Natural Resources Consulting Overview

    1. 1. Davey Resource Group … Delivering Natural Resource Management Solutions
    2. 2. Natural Resource Consulting — Who We Are <ul><li>Urban Foresters </li></ul><ul><li>Wetland Scientists </li></ul><ul><li>Restoration Ecologists </li></ul><ul><li>Endangered Species Experts </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental Planners </li></ul><ul><li>GIS Specialists </li></ul>
    3. 3. Natural Resource Consulting — What We Do <ul><li>Urban Forestry Consulting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inventories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management plans and software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planting plans and master plans </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tree appraisals and expert witness work </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ecological Services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Natural Resource Inventories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ecological restoration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Invasive species control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Endangered species surveys </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Natural Resource Consulting <ul><li>Ecological Services </li></ul>
    5. 5. Natural Resource Inventories <ul><li>Wetlands and streams </li></ul><ul><li>Woodlands and significant trees </li></ul><ul><li>Endangered species and special habitats </li></ul><ul><li>Significant geological features </li></ul><ul><li>Restoration opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Educational/outreach opportunities </li></ul>
    6. 6. Ecological Planning and Design
    7. 7. Ecological Planning and Design <ul><li>Keeping natural features </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporating green infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Designing sustainable landscapes </li></ul><ul><li>Recreational uses </li></ul><ul><li>Educational components </li></ul>
    8. 8. Ecological Planning and Design <ul><li>Designing your plan to avoid impacts to ecological features can minimize your overall project costs and help avoid lengthy. delays. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Ecological Restoration
    10. 10. Ecological Restoration
    11. 11. Invasive Species Control <ul><li>Upland and wetland areas </li></ul><ul><li>Non-natives and monocultures </li></ul><ul><li>Re-vegetation services </li></ul><ul><li>Follow-up maintenance </li></ul>
    12. 12. Ecological Services — Who We Work For <ul><li>Municipal and County Governments – engineering and planning </li></ul><ul><li>State agencies – Departments of Natural Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Federal agencies – USDA, USFWS, NPS </li></ul><ul><li>Parks – local, county, and metropolitan park districts </li></ul><ul><li>Real Estate Developers and Allied Professionals – Architects, engineers, land planners, and landscape architects </li></ul><ul><li>Non-profit Organizations – watershed organizations, arboretums </li></ul>
    13. 13. Davey Resource Group <ul><li>Urban Forestry Services </li></ul>
    14. 14. Urban Forestry Consulting Services <ul><li>Inventories for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public streets, parks, public properties and facilities, zoos, undeveloped land, cemeteries, campuses, military bases, and golf courses </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Management plans </li></ul><ul><li>Tree management software </li></ul>
    15. 15. Urban Forestry Consulting Services <ul><li>Urban Forestry Master Plans </li></ul><ul><li>Master Planting Plans </li></ul><ul><li>Forest Canopy Analysis Studies </li></ul><ul><li>Ordinance Writing </li></ul><ul><li>Operational Reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Tree Appraisal/Risk Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Cost-Benefit Analysis Studies </li></ul><ul><li>using i-TREE software </li></ul><ul><li>Contract Foresters </li></ul><ul><li>Training/Public Education </li></ul>
    16. 16. Urban Forestry Services — Who We Work For <ul><li>Municipal and County Governments – public works, parks, and planning departments </li></ul><ul><li>State agencies – Departments of Natural Resources; forestry divisions </li></ul><ul><li>Federal agencies – National Cemetery Administration, military bases, US Forest Service </li></ul><ul><li>Educational Institutions - Colleges, corporate campuses, zoos, and arboretums </li></ul><ul><li>Allied Professionals - Architects, engineers, land developers, and landscape architects </li></ul><ul><li>Non-profit Organizations – citizen/grassroots support groups, International Society of Arboriculture </li></ul>
    17. 17. Client Examples <ul><li>Municipal </li></ul><ul><li>Orlando, FL Portland, OR Sun Prairie, WI Roswell, NM </li></ul><ul><li>Ann Arbor, MI Sacramento, CA </li></ul><ul><li>Pittsburgh, PA New York, NY Alexandria, VA Granville, OH </li></ul><ul><li>Charlotte, NC Tampa, FL </li></ul><ul><li>Federal </li></ul><ul><li>Architect of the Capitol </li></ul><ul><li>National Cemetery Administration </li></ul><ul><li>Army Corps of Engineers </li></ul><ul><li>Langley Air Force Base </li></ul><ul><li>Educational Institutions </li></ul><ul><li>Bryn Mawr College </li></ul><ul><li>Audubon Zoo New Orleans National Zoo of DC </li></ul><ul><li>American University </li></ul><ul><li>George Washington University </li></ul><ul><li>Non-Profit Organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Max McGraw Wildlife Foundation </li></ul><ul><li>Northern Kentucky Urban Forestry Council International Society of Arboriculture </li></ul><ul><li>Colonial Williamsburg </li></ul>
    18. 18. Putting i-Tree to Work for Davey Clients <ul><li>Applications: </li></ul><ul><li>STRATUM, UFORE, MCTI </li></ul><ul><li>Services: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reference City Data Collection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inventory Data Conversion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data Analyses and Reports </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public Outreach </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Recent i-Tree Projects <ul><li>Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania </li></ul><ul><li>Chattanooga, Tennessee </li></ul><ul><li>Indiana (statewide) </li></ul><ul><li>Oak Lawn, Illinois </li></ul><ul><li>St. Louis, Missouri </li></ul><ul><li>Northern Kentucky </li></ul>
    20. 20. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania <ul><li>City initiated a street tree inventory in 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>Inventory-based Management Plan created </li></ul><ul><li>Nonprofit FPUF established in 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>FPUF commissioned STRATUM analysis in 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Results used for advocacy, fund-raising, recruiting, and management decisions </li></ul>
    21. 21. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania <ul><li>Benefits Defined </li></ul>www.pittsburghforest.org
    22. 22. Chattanooga, Tennessee <ul><li>U.S. Conference of Mayor’s Climate Protection Agreement signed in 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>City initiated a sample inventory in 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>City commissioned a STRATUM analysis in 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporation into Citywide Climate Action Plan </li></ul>
    23. 23. Chattanooga, Tennessee <ul><li>U.S. Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Agreement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce global warming pollution levels to 7% below 1990 levels by 2012. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing the tree canopy in the downtown area from the current seven percent to 15 percent, with an overall canopy goal of 40 percent Citywide. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>STRATUM Analysis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chattanooga’s street tree resource removes 20,000 tons of CO 2 /year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Take Root” Planting Program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1,500 trees planted downtown </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Indiana Department of Natural Resources <ul><li>20 Communities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>16 sample inventories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4 existing inventory conversions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Structural Comparison </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1994 to 2008 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small : Medium : Large </li></ul></ul><ul><li>STRATUM Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Statewide Management </li></ul>
    25. 25. Indiana Department of Natural Resources <ul><li>Using STRATUM Results for: </li></ul><ul><li>Fact Sheets </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Utility compatible species </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Benefits </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ State of the State” Report </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Change in urban forest over time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Establish state-level mgt goals </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Repeatable project, compare again in 2022? </li></ul>
    26. 26. St. Louis, Missouri <ul><li>City initiated an inventory in 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Conference of Mayor’s Climate Protection Agreement signed in 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Tree removals must result in tree reforestation; a no net loss policy ensures sufficient tree canopy Citywide </li></ul><ul><li>City commissioned STRATUM analysis in 2008 </li></ul>
    27. 27. St. Louis, Missouri >18% Benefits ($816,525) <ul><li>Over 74,000 Street Trees (20% Ash) </li></ul><ul><li>Potential Impact of EAB </li></ul>
    28. 28. St. Louis, Missouri <ul><li>Using STRATUM Results to Maximize Benefits through: </li></ul><ul><li>Expanded planting program focusing on underutilized, good performers </li></ul><ul><li>Set canopy cover increase goals, focus on increasing canopy cover across less-forested wards (use large-growing trees) </li></ul><ul><li>Efficient management </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain mature trees, they are worth it. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare for EAB </li></ul>
    29. 29. Northern Kentucky 2008 <ul><li>Five cities completed street tree inventories from 2004 through 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Non-profit Northern Kentucky Urban & Community Forestry Council commissioned UFORE analysis in 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Results used for advocacy and fund-raising </li></ul>
    30. 30. Northern Kentucky Urban Forest UFORE Analysis Summary Number of Trees 11,867 Top 3 Species Callery Pear, Red Maple, Honeylocust Population <12” DBH 75% Trees Susceptible to Insect Threats 89% Pollution Removal 17,781 lbs/year, at $44,634 year Carbon Storage 3,059 tons, at $69,745 year Compensatory Value $17,134,800 Total Value of Benefits $17,249,179 Value per Tree $1,450
    31. 31. Projected Benefits Carbon Storage (tons/year) Estimated Market Value Avoided Carbon Emissions (tC/year) Estimated Market Value Air Pollution Removal (tons/year) Estimated Market Value Total Value Existing Public Trees 3,058 $69,722 n/a n/a 2.9 $14,561 $84,283 5% Canopy Increase 6,160 $139,871 58 $1,323 6.3 $31,621 $172,815 10% Canopy Increase 9,347 $211,345 88 $2,006 9.7 $48,676 $262,027 15% Canopy Increase 12,534 $282,820 16 $2,652 13.1 $65,731 $207,262
    32. 32. DRG Urban Forestry and Ecological Consulting — We Love What We Do! Jenny Gulick Senior Urban Consulting Forester [email_address] 859-384-8258 Karen Wise Xxx Yyy zzz

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