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How to teach reading

How to teach reading

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How to teach reading

  1. 1. How to Teach Reading Yenny Cadena Diego Acuña Lorena Peña Hugo Serrano
  2. 2. AGENDA
  3. 3. The Nature of Reading We were never born to read. Humans beings invented reading only a few thousand of years ago. And with this invention, we rearranged the very organization of our brain, which in turn expanded the ways we were able to think, which altered the intellectual evolution of our species. (Wolf, 2007:3)
  4. 4. WHAT DOES READING MEAN?
  5. 5. DEFINITION OF READING “Reading is the process of receiving and interpreting information encoded in language from via the medium of print” (Urquhart & weir, 1998: 22) or “comprehension occurs when the reader extracts and integrates various information from the text and combines it with what is already known” (Koda, 2005:4)
  6. 6. Video by Dr. Richard Alligton
  7. 7. Processes that Define Reading
  8. 8. READING FOR DIFFERENT PURPOSES Reading ability can be improved by teaching how to read for particular purposes. (Anderson, 2000 a: 397)
  9. 9. Academic Purposes for Reading
  10. 10. HOW READING WORKS (LOWER LEVEL PROCESS)
  11. 11. The importance of teaching reading.
  12. 12. Teaching Reading: A Comprehensive Approach
  13. 13. HOW WE APPROACH GROUP READING ACTIVITIES? Group Group reading reading WordWordrecognition recognition exercises exercises Work with Work with vocabulary vocabulary Individualized Individualized reading reading
  14. 14. CLASSROOM PROCESSES
  15. 15. It aims to build more language It aims to build more language knowledge, rather than practice the knowledge, rather than practice the skill of reading. skill of reading.
  16. 16. THE LEARNERS CAN..
  17. 17. Activity
  18. 18. Do you like the text?
  19. 19. Letting the students in. Students are far more likely to be engaged Students are far more likely to be engaged in a text if they bring their own feelings in a text if they bring their own feelings and knowledge to the task. and knowledge to the task.
  20. 20. The Vocabulary Question. “It seems contradictory to insist that students “ read for meaning” while simultaneously discouraging them from trying to understand the text at a deeper level than merely gist”. By Carol Walker (1998).
  21. 21. Time Time Limii Lim tt Mee Ma ann ni in cco g ons g nse ens nsu ss u Worrd/ / se Wo d phrrase ph a lilmitt imi
  22. 22. Reading Lesson Sequences
  23. 23. NEGATIVE ASPECTS! Very little Very little practice of practice of the skill of the skill of reading. reading. The text The text may or may may or may not interest not interest the learner. the learner. The learner The learner will not be will not be able to read able to read quickly nor quickly nor smoothly. smoothly. Few Few chances to chances to learn the learn the patterns in patterns in English. English. The learner will The learner will not be able to not be able to read at her/his read at her/his own level of own level of reading ability. reading ability. The learner The learner often has to often has to stop reading stop reading and use a and use a dictionary. dictionary.
  24. 24. PLANNING FOR READING Before- Reading During- Reading After-Reading.
  25. 25. After-Reading activities Cartoon Strip Wanted posters Story map. Hot Seat. Monster, Vanishing Cloze.
  26. 26. After-Reading activities Freeze frames. Phonic Families. Consonant groups . Jumbled sentences.
  27. 27. ALSO…  Story innovation  Time lines.  Innovating on the Ending.  Readers’ Theatre.  Text reconstruction.  Picture and sentences Matching.  True/ false question.  Questioning the text.
  28. 28. EXTENSIVE READING io o effnitti e i ini D D n n Pur Pur pos pos ee
  29. 29. Characteristics of Successful ER Programs
  30. 30. The Benefits of ER.
  31. 31. HOW DO WE ASSESS THE STUDENTS’ EXTENSIVE READING? Since each learner is reading different books, the teacher does not have enough time to test each Students’ reading.
  32. 32. How much reading should be done? Research has shown that a learner should ideally be reading about a book a week at her level of difficulty. This amount of reading should take about 90-120 minutes per week, or about 15 minutes per day.
  33. 33. The key to a successful reading program is a good balance between Intesive Reading, Extensive Reading, the development of vocabulary, and work on reading skills and strategies.
  34. 34. Bibliography Richards, Jack C and Willy A. Renandya. 2002. Methodology in Language Teaching. Cambridge University Press. Grabe, W.(2009) Reading in a Second Language: Moving from Theory to Practice. USA. Cambridge Applied Linguistics. Gibbons, Pauline. 2002. Scaffolding language, Scaffolding learning. Waring, Rob. Oxford Graded Readers. Oxford University press.

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