Field TripsJennifer Jilkswww.jilks.com
Field Trips:When included in the school curricula   introductory activities   developmental or culminating activities  ...
Choosing A Site•suitability of different sites with respect to curriculumneeds and/or outcomes   •different types of ecosy...
Safety & Security•time of year poses a number of different problems    •Including:rain and temperature extremes that can b...
Safety•Special safety equipment  •First Aid kits, epipens•Safety issues:water, etc.•Take copies: field trip permissionform...
What about? The kid(s) left behind? No field trip permission forms?  • Setting a precedent: cost of trip, last    minute...
Prior to the ExcursionTeachers need to Fill in the forms. (You won’t believe them!) Familiarize themselves with the fiel...
Prerequisites Notify parents and/or guardians with  permission forms Organize the payment of any costs Make sure transp...
In-class Preparations• Students must understand purpose of  the trip• Familiar with the equipment to be used• Understand t...
Code of Conduct• While on the excursion develop a  contingency plan for bad weather.• Prepare for any adverse factors  whi...
On the Day Determine buddies Prepare names/lists for volunteer parents  with rules Remind students of rules in front of...
After the Trip1. Prepare tasks which can be done back   in the classroom or at home2. Provide experiences: both   quantita...
www.uen.org/utahlink/tours/fieldtrips2.htm
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2.1 field trips

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What do you need to know before you take a field trip?

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  • When included in the school curricula introductory activities to expose students to aspects of upcoming units of work are effective as developmental or culminating activities to consolidate what has been learned in the classroom provide opportunities for hands-on learning experiences where students are exposed to concrete examples rather than the abstract examples that are studied in the classroom provide added social benefits, as most of the work undertaken is done in groups may provide unexpected benefits in cases where examples seen in the field can be related to other classroom work may provide students with a greater appreciation of the environment they have investigate
  • There are a number of things to consider when selecting the site that best suits the needs and requirements of your particular field trip. These considerations may include some of the following: the suitability of different sites with respect to curriculum needs and/or outcomes. For example, the presence of different types of ecosystems and/or the level of biodiversity in the area (if conducting an ecological study) or the presence of examples of different types of land use (if looking at resource management issues) time efficiency of travel to and from the site and whether the amount of time spent traveling is worth the benefits gained while at the site. This is of greater importance with younger students, who are not as capable long trips as older students time of year poses a number of different problems, including likelihood of rain and the temperature extremes that can be expected - this will determine the appropriateness of clothing and other equipment, as well as affecting the enjoyment of the trip time of day and tides are important considerations in cases where coastal or estuary studies are being done - sun safety is also important for excursions that go through the middle of the day existence of local experts at the site, such as park rangers and/or the presence of visitor centers or displays may provide additional learning experiences whether to utilize the resources of education centers or other visitor centers in addition to your own staff and equipment existing resources, such as field trip booklets, maps and/or aerial photos, and flora and fauna lists, also need to be considered. However, the existence of a ready-made field trip booklet should not be the sole reason for attending a particular site - the value of the site as an educational resource should be the foremost factor in determining the site ’ s suitability presence of rest facilities such as bus parking, toilets and lunch areas.
  • There are a number of things to consider when selecting the site that best suits the needs and requirements of your particular field trip. These considerations may include some of the following: the suitability of different sites with respect to curriculum needs and/or outcomes. For example, the presence of different types of ecosystems and/or the level of biodiversity in the area (if conducting an ecological study) or the presence of examples of different types of land use (if looking at resource management issues) time efficiency of travel to and from the site and whether the amount of time spent traveling is worth the benefits gained while at the site. This is of greater importance with younger students, who are not as capable long trips as older students time of year poses a number of different problems, including likelihood of rain and the temperature extremes that can be expected - this will determine the appropriateness of clothing and other equipment, as well as affecting the enjoyment of the trip time of day and tides are important considerations in cases where coastal or estuary studies are being done - sun safety is also important for excursions that go through the middle of the day existence of local experts at the site, such as park rangers and/or the presence of visitor centers or displays may provide additional learning experiences whether to utilize the resources of education centers or other visitor centers in addition to your own staff and equipment existing resources, such as field trip booklets, maps and/or aerial photos, and flora and fauna lists, also need to be considered. However, the existence of a ready-made field trip booklet should not be the sole reason for attending a particular site - the value of the site as an educational resource should be the foremost factor in determining the site ’ s suitability presence of rest facilities such as bus parking, toilets and lunch areas.
  • There are a number of things to consider when selecting the site that best suits the needs and requirements of your particular field trip. These considerations may include some of the following: the suitability of different sites with respect to curriculum needs and/or outcomes. For example, the presence of different types of ecosystems and/or the level of biodiversity in the area (if conducting an ecological study) or the presence of examples of different types of land use (if looking at resource management issues) time efficiency of travel to and from the site and whether the amount of time spent traveling is worth the benefits gained while at the site. This is of greater importance with younger students, who are not as capable long trips as older students time of year poses a number of different problems, including likelihood of rain and the temperature extremes that can be expected - this will determine the appropriateness of clothing and other equipment, as well as affecting the enjoyment of the trip time of day and tides are important considerations in cases where coastal or estuary studies are being done - sun safety is also important for excursions that go through the middle of the day existence of local experts at the site, such as park rangers and/or the presence of visitor centers or displays may provide additional learning experiences whether to utilize the resources of education centers or other visitor centers in addition to your own staff and equipment existing resources, such as field trip booklets, maps and/or aerial photos, and flora and fauna lists, also need to be considered. However, the existence of a ready-made field trip booklet should not be the sole reason for attending a particular site - the value of the site as an educational resource should be the foremost factor in determining the site ’ s suitability presence of rest facilities such as bus parking, toilets and lunch areas.
  • notify parents and/or guardians to obtain permission for students to attend, and organize the payment of any costs which are to be covered by students make sure transport is arranged - check prior to departure date to ensure that the bus company has the correct date, time and place prepare the excursion booklet or, if using an existing booklet, ensure that it is still relevant it may be advisable to collect field booklets each time they are used prior to the field trip to ensure that they are not misplaced or forgotten on the day complete in-class preparations so that students understand the purpose of the trip and are familiar with the site and equipment to be used, the tasks they will perform in the field, and the equipment they will use to perform these tasks brief students on the equipment and food supplies they will require on the day such as pens, pencils, clip board, excursion booklet, drinking water, and lunch outline requirements for clothing suitable for the field trip, bearing in mind any special safety equipment, or sun-sensible clothing that will be required ensure that first aid requirements are in place and that students are aware of safety issues brief students on a code of conduct and the need to minimize environmental impacts while on the excursion develop a contingency plan for bad weather or other adverse factors which could affect the running of the field trip or even require the cancellation of the trip prepare a checklist, which can be completed before every field trip, to help ensure nothing is missed.
  • notify parents and/or guardians to obtain permission for students to attend, and organize the payment of any costs which are to be covered by students make sure transport is arranged - check prior to departure date to ensure that the bus company has the correct date, time and place prepare the excursion booklet or, if using an existing booklet, ensure that it is still relevant it may be advisable to collect field booklets each time they are used prior to the field trip to ensure that they are not misplaced or forgotten on the day complete in-class preparations so that students understand the purpose of the trip and are familiar with the site and equipment to be used, the tasks they will perform in the field, and the equipment they will use to perform these tasks brief students on the equipment and food supplies they will require on the day such as pens, pencils, clip board, excursion booklet, drinking water, and lunch outline requirements for clothing suitable for the field trip, bearing in mind any special safety equipment, or sun-sensible clothing that will be required ensure that first aid requirements are in place and that students are aware of safety issues brief students on a code of conduct and the need to minimize environmental impacts while on the excursion develop a contingency plan for bad weather or other adverse factors which could affect the running of the field trip or even require the cancellation of the trip prepare a checklist, which can be completed before every field trip, to help ensure nothing is missed.
  • notify parents and/or guardians to obtain permission for students to attend, and organize the payment of any costs which are to be covered by students make sure transport is arranged - check prior to departure date to ensure that the bus company has the correct date, time and place prepare the excursion booklet or, if using an existing booklet, ensure that it is still relevant it may be advisable to collect field booklets each time they are used prior to the field trip to ensure that they are not misplaced or forgotten on the day complete in-class preparations so that students understand the purpose of the trip and are familiar with the site and equipment to be used, the tasks they will perform in the field, and the equipment they will use to perform these tasks brief students on the equipment and food supplies they will require on the day such as pens, pencils, clip board, excursion booklet, drinking water, and lunch outline requirements for clothing suitable for the field trip, bearing in mind any special safety equipment, or sun-sensible clothing that will be required ensure that first aid requirements are in place and that students are aware of safety issues brief students on a code of conduct and the need to minimize environmental impacts while on the excursion develop a contingency plan for bad weather or other adverse factors which could affect the running of the field trip or even require the cancellation of the trip prepare a checklist, which can be completed before every field trip, to help ensure nothing is missed.
  • 2.1 field trips

    1. 1. Field TripsJennifer Jilkswww.jilks.com
    2. 2. Field Trips:When included in the school curricula introductory activities developmental or culminating activities consolidate learning provide opportunities for hands-on learning experiences exposed students to concrete vs.abstract added social benefits provide a greater appreciation of the environment they have investigate integrate learning
    3. 3. Choosing A Site•suitability of different sites with respect to curriculumneeds and/or outcomes •different types of ecosystems and/or the level of biodiversity •presence of examples of different types of land use (resource management issues) •time efficiency of travel to and from the site •whether the amount of time spent traveling is worth the benefits gained • younger students, who are not as capable long trips as older students •Costs vs. benefits
    4. 4. Safety & Security•time of year poses a number of different problems •Including:rain and temperature extremes that can be expected•the appropriateness of clothing and other equipment•sun safety is also important for excursions•existence of local experts at the site•whether to utilize the resources of education or visitor centers •use existing resources: field trip booklets, maps and/or aerial photos, and flora and fauna•value of the site as an educational resource: the foremost factor•presence of facilities such as bus parking, toilets and lunch areas.
    5. 5. Safety•Special safety equipment •First Aid kits, epipens•Safety issues:water, etc.•Take copies: field trip permissionforms with contact info•Brief students on the food theywill require (drinking water/ lunch)•Suitable clothing
    6. 6. What about? The kid(s) left behind? No field trip permission forms? • Setting a precedent: cost of trip, last minute, lessons need to be learned! Not enough adult supervisors? • Retired teachers, relatives • Cancellation?
    7. 7. Prior to the ExcursionTeachers need to Fill in the forms. (You won’t believe them!) Familiarize themselves with the field trip site Suitability of the site Awareness of safety procedures Essential to have an in-depth knowledge of the site Perform the necessary risk assessments.
    8. 8. Prerequisites Notify parents and/or guardians with permission forms Organize the payment of any costs Make sure transportation is arranged (Buses can be difficult to book.) Check buses prior to departure date Prepare the excursion booklet Collect field booklets each time they are used.
    9. 9. In-class Preparations• Students must understand purpose of the trip• Familiar with the equipment to be used• Understand tasks they will perform• Prepare: pens, pencils, clip boards,questions for reflection• Need to minimize environmental impacts: • Garbage • minimize ecological footprints • hands off flora & fauna!
    10. 10. Code of Conduct• While on the excursion develop a contingency plan for bad weather.• Prepare for any adverse factors which could affect the field trip or even require cancellation.• Have parents accompany at-risk students.• Prepare a checklist, which can be completed before every field trip.
    11. 11. On the Day Determine buddies Prepare names/lists for volunteer parents with rules Remind students of rules in front of parent supervisors! Send bus manifest to office Take a cell phone? Make sure that all the necessary equipment has been gathered All students are aboard the bus and accounted for. “Same seats”
    12. 12. After the Trip1. Prepare tasks which can be done back in the classroom or at home2. Provide experiences: both quantitative and qualitative analysis3. Provide opportunities for students to analyze and/or summarize4. Students who do not attend can still write a report!5. Report on the information collected in the field or use this information in other aspects of their classroom work.
    13. 13. www.uen.org/utahlink/tours/fieldtrips2.htm
    14. 14. Aboriginal Festival
    15. 15. International Aboriginal Festival
    16. 16. International Aboriginal Festival

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