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The Myth of Professional Neutrality Presentation by Jenna Freedman,  Rutgers University School of Communication and Inform...
why myth? <ul><li>In defense of user rights, librarians have sometimes been labeled radical militants, but more typically ...
exploring the myth <ul><li>At the reference desk </li></ul><ul><li>Style, demographics, patron biases </li></ul><ul><li>Ch...
on your own time <ul><li>It is important to dispute the notion of detached objectivity in information services and to make...
bibliography <ul><li>ALA Library Bill of Rights </li></ul><ul><li>Jones, Marie (2004) “Interview.”  Tennessee Librarian , ...
resources/contact info <ul><li>Rad Ref NYC , meeting Sunday, email info@radicalreference.nyc </li></ul><ul><li>Barnard Lib...
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Myth of Professional Neutrality

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Myth of Professional Neutrality

  1. 1. The Myth of Professional Neutrality Presentation by Jenna Freedman, Rutgers University School of Communication and Information Symposium November 11, 2009
  2. 2. why myth? <ul><li>In defense of user rights, librarians have sometimes been labeled radical militants, but more typically they adhere to the principles of nonjudgmental service, balanced collections, and political neutrality. symposium announcement viewed 11/10/09 </li></ul><ul><li>There was never, for me as a teacher and writer, an obsession with “objectivity,” which I considered neither possible nor desirable. I understood early that what is presented as “history” or as “news” is inevitably a selection out of an infinite amount of information, and that what is selected depends on what the selector thinks is important. --Howard Zinn </li></ul>
  3. 3. exploring the myth <ul><li>At the reference desk </li></ul><ul><li>Style, demographics, patron biases </li></ul><ul><li>Choosing materials </li></ul><ul><li>Balance vs. representation </li></ul><ul><li>In the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Information literacy/critical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>In the catalog </li></ul><ul><li>Default terminology </li></ul><ul><li>Administration and infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Status quo </li></ul>
  4. 4. on your own time <ul><li>It is important to dispute the notion of detached objectivity in information services and to make room for all levels of library activism both within professional associations and beyond in the larger sphere. The latter realm is where RR has chosen to devote its energies, forming partnerships that embrace the places where we share ideals, needs, and solutions. The challenges and excitement of collaborating with the greater activist world engage us as community members and invigorate us as librarians. –Melissa Morrone and Lia Friedman </li></ul>
  5. 5. bibliography <ul><li>ALA Library Bill of Rights </li></ul><ul><li>Jones, Marie (2004) “Interview.” Tennessee Librarian , 54:4 , 17-25 </li></ul><ul><li>Morrone, Melissa and Friedman, Lia (2009) “ Radical Reference: Socially Responsible Librarianship Collaborating with Community ,” The Reference Librarian , 50:4, 371-396 </li></ul><ul><li>Zinn, Howard (1997), “Introduction,” The Zinn Reader . New York: Seven Stories Press. p.16 </li></ul>
  6. 6. resources/contact info <ul><li>Rad Ref NYC , meeting Sunday, email info@radicalreference.nyc </li></ul><ul><li>Barnard Library Zine Collection </li></ul><ul><li>IM: BarnardLibJenna </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>(If the email addresses look strange, it’s because they are—figure it out!) </li></ul>

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