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First Year English Workshop: Library Research Instruction -- Databases

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First Year English Workshop: Library Research Instruction -- Databases

  1. 1. First Year English Workshop Legacy of the Mediterranean Library Research, Part II Professor Shelly Fredman Librarian Jenna Freedman October 15, 2013
  2. 2. Databases: an Introduction What • Articles • Book chapters • Dissertations • Proceedings What what • Citations • Abstracts • Html full text • Pdf of article Why • Secondary sources • Literature review • Current awareness • Shorter, more focused works (than books) • Multiple simultaneous users
  3. 3. Literary, critical, or close reading • Include name of text or author in search • Add terms to explore an aspect of the text that interests you • E.g., characters, themes, places, etc. 3 Image from ManageWP blog post by Tom Ewer
  4. 4. MLA • Literary criticism • eLink • Clues: • Articles & chapters vs. proceedings & dissertations • Your age or younger • Citations & cited by
  5. 5. Historical • Include words or phrases important to historical context – date-specific (16th or sixteenth century) – Era-specific (Elizabethan) – Geographical (England) • Do not include text title or author 5 Image from Wikimedia Commons: Exponate im hauseigenen Museum
  6. 6. Historical Abstracts • Historical period • Truncation * • Limits: date, subject, book reviews
  7. 7. Theoretical • Include words or phrases related to your theorist or lens – Select discipline specific databases (e.g., gender studies, philosophy, psychology, etc.) – Use theorist's name or philosophy in search term in interdisciplinary database – Consider reference sources • You may or may not include text title or author 7 Public domain image Rorschach1WithMarksCrop from Wikimedia Commons
  8. 8. Find Articles • Theory • Facets • Limits
  9. 9. How to choose? • Author and publisher's perspectives/point of view. • Relevance to your research • Currency of scholarship • Sources cited by this source (look in the bibliography) • Sources citing this source (Google Scholar is an easy, though imprecise way to check)
  10. 10. Remember
  11. 11. Your Personal Librarian
  12. 12. Feedback form (again!)

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