NEWS HEADLINE WRITING             Daily Under 20,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE Index-Journal Scott J. Bryan
NEWS HEADLINE WRITING           Daily 20,000 - 50,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACEHerald-JournalPhillip Randall
NEWS HEADLINE WRITING                                            Daily 20,000 - 50,000 DivisionSECOND PLACE               ...
NEWS HEADLINE WRITING          Daily 20,000 - 50,000 Division                        Rubber meets the road                ...
NEWS HEADLINE WRITING                                                                                Daily Over 50,000 Div...
NEWS HEADLINE WRITING    Daily Over 50,000 Division     SECOND PLACE         The State     Robert J. Venturella
NEWS HEADLINE WRITING                                                                 Daily Over 50,000 Division          ...
SPOT NEWS REPORTING           Daily Under 20,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACEThe ItemNick McCormac,Jade Andersonand Robert J. Baker...
SPOT NEWS REPORTING           Daily Under 20,000 DivisionSECOND PLACEThe Times and DemocratRichard WalkerWoman Dies in Tra...
SPOT NEWS REPORTING            Daily Under 20,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE                Cut draws workers’ ire               ...
SPOT NEWS REPORTING          Daily 20,000 - 50,000 DivisionHONORABLEMENTIONIndependentMailNikie MayoHaven Struck by Blaze
SPOT NEWS REPORTING  Daily 20,000 - 50,000 Division     THIRD PLACE       Morning News       Tucker Mitchell  DOJ Weighs i...
SPOT NEWS REPORTING          Daily 20,000 - 50,000 Division                                                               ...
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5
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S.C. Press Association 2011 News Contest Winners, part 3 of 5.

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Daily Awards Presentation - Part 3 of 5

  1. 1. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING Daily Under 20,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE Index-Journal Scott J. Bryan
  2. 2. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING Daily 20,000 - 50,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACEHerald-JournalPhillip Randall
  3. 3. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING Daily 20,000 - 50,000 DivisionSECOND PLACE ■ ■ “It is so good it makes me want toIndependent Mail ■ go back to school.” ■ Randy Hayes Pendleton mayor ■ It’s aMike McMillan ■ ■ ■ KEN RUINARD Independent Mail photos wrap! MORE MORE Video and photos of food tasting at Mount Lebanon Elementary School students Chandler-Brooke Wilkinson, 12, right, and Kennedy Harrison, 11, left, ONLINE ONLINE www.independent discover the chef hat is too big for Colt Martin, 12, as student council members prepare to serve a chicken wrap that is a mail.com. semifinalist in first lady Michelle Obama’s Recipes for Healthy Kids competition. Hawaiian Chicken entry at Mount Lebanon school gets good grades from judges BY VINCE JACKSON Special to Independent Mail PENDLETON — A Pendleton el- ementary school received a visit Friday from a team of national judges who came to taste the school’s new lunch food. The new dish vaulted the Hearsay school into the semifinals of first lady Michelle Obama’s Recipes for Healthy Kids compe- The Bee Man gets an A for his response to uninvited guests tition. Last year the U.S. Department of Agriculture launched a cam- paign to develop school lunch foods that are healthy taste good , A big thank-you to the bee ■ News from 13-Year Cicada Cen- where it was coming from.” Several and are fun to eat. man! Hearsayer Audrey B. tral! “It’s like being in a sci-fi hours later, Ms. M said, she discov- PSST … The first lady made the initia- PASS IT ON tive part of her Healthy Kids of Hart County had a lot to movie!” Hearsayer Cynthia of ered “these huge bugs on the play campaign to remove sugars and say about a recent encounter with Abbeville opined on May 3. “I was set. Lots of them — cicadas! I would fats from school lunch menus. A Crunchy Hawaiian Chicken Wrap, one of several made for Pendleton Mayor Randy Hayes, right, sitting beside Todd a bunch of honeybees on Easter outside with my dog, PJ, and the never have predicted the sounds HEARSAY is written Mount Lebanon Elementary judges at Mount Lebanon Elementary School in Pendleton. Bedenbaugh, director of the South Carolina Department of weekend. “They were hugging the noise was like we were getting at- coming from such small creatures.” by Salley M. McIner- School answered the call with Education Office of Health and Nutrition, tries a chicken wrap. side of a tree about 10 feet up and tacked. You could hear them crawl- Well, all you fine Hearsayers who ney. If you have a their Crunchy Hawaiian Chick- beans and peas. legumes) - $1,500; second place the swarm was about five inches ing around. They were flying every- have been hearing cicadas, thank contribution for en Wrap entry in the Dark “Recipes for Healthy Kids (dry beans and legumes) - $1,000; with student chef assistants by dents, creativity and presenta- Green and Orange Vegetable draws on America’s culinary Popular Choice Award - $1,500. her side, Lorett Arnold-Hayes tion, according to Chartwells thick!” Mrs. Aud allowed as how where and hitting the house. It was you for letting Hearsay know about Hearsay — some- category . creativity and dedication to For a complete list and to vote demonstrated for the judges School Dining Services. her fam didn’t know what to do really spooky!” Thanks, Cyn, and the noise. Just wish they’d come to thing you’ve seen or The wrap was the brainchild healthy lifestyles,” said Tim on your favorite recipe, visit the how the wrap is made. Chartwells provides dining about the bees but remembered read this from Hearsayer Moma- Hartwell so Hearsay could hear ‘em heard that struck of team members Vikki Mulli- O’Connor, USDA associate ad- Recipes for Healthy Kids web- “It is really very easy eco- , services for more than 550 pub- having “bought a quart of honey gain45: “I live near the Ebenezer too! you as funny, silly, in- nax, a school nutrition profes- ministrator for Special Nutri- site at www.recipesforkids nomical and time efficient,” she lic school districts and private at Morgan Hardware (in Lavonia, Fire Department, just off Highway ■ Fried cicadas for supper? Now teresting, entertain- sional; Chef Lorett Arnold- tion Programs. “Chefs are pro- challenge.com. Voting ends May said. schools nationwide. Hayes of 1826 on the Green in viding culinary expertise, 31. “All of the students here at “We are excited about the op- Ga.) and it was Mr. Walker’s Hon- 413. I noticed the buzzing sound Hearsayer Martha, who lives in the ing, odd or other- Pendleton; community member school nutrition professionals A host of school officials and the school have really gotten in- portunities that this recipe con- ey from Martin, Ga. We got the The Bee Man Sunday (May 1). The buzzing never Slabtown community near Ander- wise — get in touch Kristi Martin; parent and are sharing insight as to what dignitaries, from the South Car- to this contest,” said school test brings to the school commu- telephone number of Mr. Walker stops and seems to get louder dur- son, tuned in with — believe it or with Salley. Her e- teacher Edie Wilkinson; and can be accomplished in a school olina Department of Education Principal Mona Fleming. “We nity in Anderson County School from the jar of honey. He came in into the box … Our family ing the day!” And from Hearsayer not — a really fine fried cicada mail address is sal- student Chandler Wilkinson. setting, and kids and parents to the mayor of Pendleton, filled have seen a rise in interest in District 4,” said Barbara Gard- his overalls and beard and said he learned so much that day and re- JRB1953: “They have been buzzing recipe! “I found an Indian cookbook ley@hartcom.net. The Mount Lebanon recipe are making sure that students the school cafeteria as the na- healthy eating spurred by this ner, director of dining for was among 15 chosen to move will choose these nutritious tional judges set about their event.” Chartwells in District 4. has been keeping bees and mak- alized the miracle of pollination all day today (May 3) in the Cray- at a yard sale,” Mrs. M mentioned. forward in the competition from items in school and beyond.” work. After tasting a sample of the After sampling the chicken ing honey since he was a young and new life. Thank you, Mr. tonville area.” And from Hearsayer “This is one of the recipes: ‘LO- schools in 11 states, including Winning recipes will also re- “It is exciting that Mount chicken wrap Pendleton Mayor wrap and marking their score boy. Mr. Walker climbed a ladder Walker, for all your experience Mdale, who lives between Iva and CUST. Gather locust (cicada) at Arizona, South Carolina, Flori- ceive monetary prizes totaling Lebanon is a semifinalist,” said Randy Hayes said, “It is so good cards the judges awaited the ar- and gently swept the bees into one and knowledge!” And by the bee Antreville, on S.C. 184. “I came night, then pick up those out of da, California, Massachusetts, $12,000: Grand prize winner - Lee D’Andrea, superintendent it makes me want to go back to rival of the first group of stu- of his boxes. As long as the queen way, Mr. Walker’s first name is home to an irritating noise today shell, remove shell from others. Do Colorado, North Carolina, Min- $3,000; first place (whole grains) Anderson District 4. “All of this school.” dents to eat lunch. USDA nutri- nesota, Ohio, New Mexico and - $1,500; second place (whole fits into our healthy lifestyles The judges will determine tionist Ann Hall said she was bee enters the box, they will all “Rollo” (pronounced “Rah-lo”) (May 6). It sounded like a lot of not let sunshine on them or they Connecticut. From among the grains) - $1,000; first place (dark and wellness teaching. We are which three entries, in each cat- anxious to gauge the acceptance follow. Mr. Walker asked for a cup and if you are beset by a swarm of emergency vehicles. I rode up the will spoil. Wash and then fry in a 340 entries submitted, five were green and orange vegetables) - addressing childhood obesity egory will move on to the na- , of the food by the students. of coffee, waited a while and con- bees, by all means, call the bee road and down the road but didn’t small amount of grease. Eat hot or selected in each of three cate- $1,500; second place (dark green and positive eating habits in our tional competition in July The . “That is what it is all about,” tinued another sweeping of bees man at (706) 599-1073. see anything and couldn’t tell cold.’ “ Or maybe not at all? gories: whole grains, dark green and orange vegetables) - $1,000; schools.” finals will be in Texas. Judging she said, “The kids have got to and orange vegetables, and dry first place (dry beans and Dressed in the attire of a chef is based on taste, appeal to stu- like it, too.”
  4. 4. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING Daily 20,000 - 50,000 Division Rubber meets the road uck flips, spills hundreds of tires on I-85/ Feeling taxed? As deadline looms, how states stack up TAX DEADLINE Federal taxes are dueFIRST PLACE typical April 15, which fa BY THOMAS HARGROVE is delayed only for weeke Scripps Howard News Service April 15 is not a federa Every spring, millions of D.C., typically celebrates Americans rush to the post dent Abraham Lincoln’s f office to file their taxes be- 16, but moved the celeb fore the April deadline. The April 18 deadline w Paying taxes unites us. It government shutdown, a also divides us. Payment of tax refunds, People can pay five and down happens and lasts. even six times more in state and local taxes than other folks in similar circum- stances making similar in- comes, according to recent studies of relative tax bur- dens. South C “Taxes vary by a pretty significant amount in Amer- ica,” concluded Mark Robyn, a staff economist at is a low Independent Mail the Tax Foundation, a con- BY MIKE ELLIS servative study group based Independent Mail in Washington, D.C. ellism@/260.1277 “The highly taxed states tend to be in the Northeast South Carolina’s ove and in the mid-Atlantic re- taxes are the second-low gion. They have more gov- in the nation, according ernment services, bigger study by the conserva government, and so they Tax Foundation. raise more revenue to sup- “South Carolina is ju port that government,” low-tax state, genera Robyn said. “The South and said Mark Robyn, autho Southwest tend to be lower- the tax burden study . taxed.” But other studies — For example, a married the government of Wa Kylie Yerka couple with three children ington, D.C., and by Li earning $50,000 will pay ty Tax Service, which about $10,348 a year in state based in Virginia — put and local income, property , Palmetto State at 37th sales and automobile taxes 31st in terms of its tax b if they live in Bridgeport, den. Conn., according to a study When it comes to s the District of Columbia tax, the state’s 6-percent city government released in is tied for 13th highest in September 2010. country . But if that family lived in Its income taxes, ho Cheyenne, Wyo., it would ing around 7 percent for pay only about $2,186, ical residents, are aver thanks to modest property Robyn said. Property ta taxes and no state income are lower than the natio tax. average, but close to it. “We are a very conserva- All told, South Carol tive state, very frugal in our winds up as a strikingly spending. It’s always been tax state, Robyn said. that way,” said Wyoming “When I think of s State Revenue Director Ed and local taxes, I think going broke to pay for Schmidt. His state, the na- come, sales and prope tion’s top coal producer, taxes,” he said. “South C levies mineral-production olina isn’t particularly taxes that help hold down in any of those. But if other taxes, he suggested. add it all up, it’s there. O Although methods of cal- er states tend to tax culating tax burdens vary thing or something else p enormously — as do the con- Independent Mail file photos ty highly .” clusions they draw most J d Elli tt f A d i fl g l g S C 28 B i A d t tt t Robyn said his study 23a GA$ Prices in South Carolina nearly a dollar more than this time last year, but headed down BY KIRK BROWN a week on gas. Independent Mail E li thi th th U S
  5. 5. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING Daily Over 50,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACE A mom’s Hoax world The Post and Courier spurs falls apart bank PROVIDED Boys’ daring adventure leads to tragedy for 12-year-old Beth Harrison hoopla Scare captivates onlookers, ties up traffic, first responders BY DAVID W. MACDOUGALL macdougd@postandcourier.com Craig and Gayle Voelker of Illi- nois were enjoying their first visit to Charleston on Wednesday when they walked out of the Daughters of the Confederacy Museum and into what looked like a scene from “Dog Day Afternoon.” “We walked out, and the first thing3. we see is cops with machine guns,” WADE SPEES/STAFFy Gayle Voelker said. City police offi- Teal Baptiste, mother of 12-year-old Corion Baptiste (top), talks about her son who was found dead cers were kneeling behind their police late Sunday, several hours after he and three others entered a locked shipping-container facility Awendaw beaver population a gnawing problem cars with rifles and semiautomatic weapons aimed at the entrance to the Wachovia Bank at the corner of Meet- ing and Market streets, she said. Her husband began shooting video. and drove heavy machinery through the yard at ConGlobal Industries off Spruill Avenue in North Charleston. On the right is a friend, Ajanaclair Lynch. BY GLENN SMITH and ANDY PARAS gsmith@postandcourier.com 00 Rumors spread quickly in the aparas@postandcourier.com78) BY PRENTISS FINDLAY causes his flooding problems. The Mike Taylor said throngs of tourists who were watching Teal Baptiste felt a knot form in her stomach when 11 pfindlay@postandcourier.com state is taking aim at the issue. But stagnant water all the commotion. It was a bank rob- her 8-year-old son came through the door without his bery. There were guns and hostages. 82 that may not be enough. in the drainage Someone tried to rob the bank with a older brother by his side. Young Ahmad had gone off to play Sunday after- AWENDAW — When night falls Last week, the Department of canal next to his bomb strapped to his body. noon with his 12-year-old brother, Corion, and two other boys during a family visit to North Charleston’s None of it was true, police later said. here, the problems start. Transportation awarded a $55,000 house does not No robbery. No hostages. No weap- Union Heights neighborhood. Now, Ahmad had re- turned alone, wet and dirty. That’s when the beavers come out contract to the state Department of drain because ons. No bomb. She asked him what happened. Ahmad wouldn’t say.9B to build dams and create their own Natural Resources to trap and re- beavers build Though no one was injured, the bi- He seemed out of sorts. He kept asking for a blanket, though it was 100 degrees in the house. zarre incident tied up dozens of police4B private pools. locate beavers that affect highway dams that block and firefighters and snarled traffic in Baptiste took to the streets to search for her miss- ing son, the sensitive boy she called her hero. Hour FILE1C Trouble is, they also flood about drainage in Berkeley and Charles- the canal. The the heart of Charleston’s tourist dis- after hour, calling his name, looking in yards, ask- This is an example of a top loader much like the ing others if they had seen him. Sunset came, then one that was involved in the accident in which a2B trict for more than three hours. an acre of Mike Taylor’s land on ton counties. backup causes At 2:43 p.m., police received a call darkness. Quickly, hope began to fade for the single 12-year-old boy was killed. mom of six.7B Sewee Road. “Beavers take up residence in about an acre from a clerk at the Wachovia office “I could feel it in my stomach, like a mother’s intu- at 177 Meeting St., police spokesman ition,” she said, a tear sliding down her cheek. “I just MULTIMEDIA2A He joked about setting up a stand pipes throughout the state system,” of his land to be Charles Francis said. knew something bad had happened to him.” To hear a 911 call about the top loader tragedy, go to postandcourier.com/ on his property offering three shots said Kirk Richards, DOT assistant under water. A man had gone to a teller and said Please see TRAGEDY, Page 7A audio. he was being held against his will and at the rodents for $5. district maintenance engineer. PRENTISS FINDLAY/ He waved and said ‘Bye Mama.’ That was the last time I saw him. Taylor said a beaver dam in a STAFF Please see INCIDENT, Page 5A drainage pipe under Sewee Road Please see BEAVERS, Page 7A
  6. 6. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING Daily Over 50,000 Division SECOND PLACE The State Robert J. Venturella
  7. 7. NEWS HEADLINE WRITING Daily Over 50,000 Division chain hoists. d y t Hunley on a slow rollFIRST PLACE s, nd Confederate sub rotated a few millimeters at a time; should be upright today BY BRIAN HICKS bhicks@postandcourier.com VIDEO perfectly aligned.” Barring any complications, the ro- The Hunley has rested on its star- board side since it was recovered from See provided video of tation should be finished sometime the Atlantic Ocean in 2000. Archae- The H.L. Hunley was never a fast the Hunley rotation at today. ologists wanted the sub lifted in the ain boat, but it probably never moved postandcourier.com/ This is a major step in the Hunley position it was found to avoid moving The Post and Courier . this slowly. On Wednesday, engineers and sci- videos. project, one last engineering puzzle before conservators put the sub entists at the Warren Lasch Conserva- by slowly adjusting the 15 straps that through the restoration process. The tion Center began rotating the Con- cradle the Hunley, and keeping a la- move attracted the attention of myri- federate submarine into an upright ser sight running from stern to bow ad people who have had a hand in the position — 3 millimeters at a time. that would detect any twisting of the project, from State Archaeologist Jon- The pace was plodding, the progress hull. athan Leader to former Friends of the artifacts inside the sub. The Hunley has remained in that position ever since. But now the entire hull needs to be exposed so that conservators can re- move the crusted sand and shell that covers the hull in preparation for the Tony Brown Roadhouse blues Music, liquor, young crowds can be magnet for trouble, authorities sayDeclaration of ‘war’ Be alert: BY BO PETERSEN bpetersen@postandcourier.com Portuguese man-of-war — the gorgeous, jellyfish-like creature with tentacles that can hang as long as a tree is high and a sting Painful ‘blue FOLLY BEACH — It looked like a shiny blue balloon, bobbing across the surf be- that burns like fire. The man-of-war spot- ted Wednesday was one of at least three orbottle jellyfish’ tween the Washout and the Morris Island Lighthouse. The woman wading started to four spotted near Lowcountry beaches over the past few days. A beachgoer reported are lurking in go see when someone on shore screamed for her to stop Please see ‘WAR’ Page 6A
  8. 8. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Daily Under 20,000 DivisionTHIRD PLACEThe ItemNick McCormac,Jade Andersonand Robert J. BakerFor Many, Quake HitsClose to Home
  9. 9. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Daily Under 20,000 DivisionSECOND PLACEThe Times and DemocratRichard WalkerWoman Dies in Train Crash
  10. 10. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Daily Under 20,000 DivisionFIRST PLACE Cut draws workers’ ire Proposed budget cut protested by Social Security employees Aiken Standard By JEREMY TIMMERMAN Staff writer A proposal in the U.S. House of Representatives to cut $1.7 billion from the “We struggle to pay people in the right amount, on time, all the time,” she said. One option that might be given to qualified workers who are 55 years of age and T budget of the Social Security have been working for the p Jeremy Timmerman Administration will have side of the administration’s The main issue for the 12 to 14 protesters, who were agency for at least 20 years is local consequences, according a buyout. Campbell said that to protesting employees out- she was “not in a position” to take the buyout, but if she office on Corporate Parkway. met qualifications, she would “have to think long and hard” about leaving under buyout Cut Draws Workers’ Ire giving up their lunch breaks terms. for the demonstration, was Campbell added that the the monthlong furloughs that number of experienced work- could result from the cut. ers who would potentially Ardell Campbell, who has accept a buyout and leave been working for the admin- the agency would also have istration for 15 years, said negative consequences on the that the level of service the quality of service offered. office is able to deliver will Multiple media outlets suffer if workers are forced reported similar protests C to take a month off from their across the country in response t duties. to the proposal. c “The federal government The reports also indicated r is proposing furloughs of that the other protests had Social Security employees, been organized by a national t so we wouldn’t be able to trade union. t produce the kind of world- Not all of those involved class service we have been,” with the Aiken demonstra- t Campbell said. “The Ameri- tion were current employees. i can public deserves the kind At least one retiree, Glenda n of world-class service we’ve Corbett, donated her time for o been providing.” the cause. i Campbell added that, due Corbett, a 2002 retiree b to the amount of work she after more than 38 years with A and her coworkers face in a the administration, agreed t given day, they find it dif- that expecting the necessary ficult to keep up, even when amount of work with employ- h the office, located off Whis- ees taking monthlong fur- t key Road, across from South loughs was unreasonable. Staff photo by Michael Gibbons p Aiken High School, is fully Ardell Campbell stands on the sidewalk on Corporate Park- n staffed. Please see PROTEST, page 5A way during her lunch break from the Social Security office.
  11. 11. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Daily 20,000 - 50,000 DivisionHONORABLEMENTIONIndependentMailNikie MayoHaven Struck by Blaze
  12. 12. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Daily 20,000 - 50,000 Division THIRD PLACE Morning News Tucker Mitchell DOJ Weighs in on Vote Map
  13. 13. SPOT NEWS REPORTING Daily 20,000 - 50,000 Division HOSPITALIZED GRAHAM ‘IN GOOD SPIRITS’ ● 3A SERVING YORK ● CHESTER ● LANCASTER COUNTIES The Herald 50 CENTSSECOND PLACE THURSDAY May 12, 2011 SPECIAL STORM COVERAGE | UPDATES AND PHOTOS AT HERALDONLINE.COM Storms pack a punch Rock Hill ● South Carolina heraldonline.com ■ Rain and hurricane-force winds hit York, ■ Extensive damage reported as fallen trees,The Herald Chester and Lancaster counties overnight power lines leave thousands without power By Nicole E. Smith and Jamie Self nsmith@heraldonline.com jself@heraldonline.com Severe thunderstorms with hur- ricane-force winds pummeled York County early Wednesday causing widespread power outages and, for some, severe damage reminiscent of Hurricane Hugo. Mike and Shirley Brown woke toNicole Smith, news that midnight winds sheared off the roof of their church, Living Hope Freewill Baptist, on old North Main Street in Clover. Only blue sky covered their flooded sanctuary Wednesday afternoon. “It’s a total loss,” said Ed Le- mieux, an owner of the building the church leases. He drove to the Browns’ home to break the news. “They just put in all new bath- rooms, all new walls,” he said. “This is sister Shirley calling,” Shirley said to church members from her couch Wednesday morn-James Self, ing. “The wind has torn our church down.” Winds between 60 and 80 mph swept the Piedmont after midnight Tuesday in a storm with rare intensi- ty, meteorologists from the National Weather Service said. A line of tight- ly packed thunderstorms developed late Tuesday in Ohio and moved south through York County before reaching the coast. The storm was more severe than similar storms in this area, NWS meteorologist Neil Dixon said. Tuesday night’s storm frontShawn Cetrone spanned more than 100 miles, pro- ducing hurricane-force winds. Meteorologists are now survey- ing damage in York, Cherokee, and Chester counties to determine how high the winds speeds were, he said. Local authorities reported hun- JAMIE SELF - jself@heraldonline.com Members of the Living Hope Freewill Baptist Church in Clover survey the damage in the sanctuary. The church was recently renovated, but the building was not insured. See STORMS ● 5A HICKORY GROVE CHESTER COUNTY Couple: Chester’s ‘hard hit’ drawsand Andrew Dys ‘Everything was falling down’ By Shawn Cetrone scetrone@heraldonline.com HICKORY GROVE — Rebecca Blackwood was lying in bed at mid- MICHAEL CARR Hugo, war comparisons By Andrew Dys adys@heraldonline.com CHESTER — Storms with winds that reached 90 mph ripped through Chester County early Wednes- day, causing damage emergency officials are saying is the worst since Hurricane Hugo in 1989. Damage totals could reach into the millions of dol-Storm Packs a Punch night watching the weather on tele- Tom Blackwood of Hickory Grove stands next to an oak tree that lars, emergency workers said, as dozens of homes vision, when she saw that a danger- crashed through his home during Wednesday’s overnight storms. and businesses were smashed by falling trees or had ous thunderstorm was encroach- roofs ripped off. ing on her Hickory Grove home. As Thomas, 66, and Rebecca, 61, Storm coverage No injuries had been reported by late Wednesday. Outside, lightning flashed amid headed for the cellar, two more oaks The only deaths were scores of baby turkeys at a roaring thunder and bawling collapsed on their home of 32 years. SCHOOLS: Chester County schools farm in northwestern Chester County – but property winds. “Everything was falling down,” on two-hour delay. Most other damage is severe over much of the county. DAN O’MARA - domara@heraldonline.com She elbowed her husband, who he said. districts on regular schedule. 5A “There are spots where it looks like a war zone,” Landscaping clings to the rootball of a huge awoke, saw the TV and glanced out Their path was blocked. THE REGION: Residents and said Ed Darby, the county’s deputy emergency man- tree that toppled over in the yard of this home the window. Wearing only shorts, Thomas business owners share their agement director. “The city of Chester seems to have near downtown Chester. “I jumped up and grabbed my grabbed a blanket and wrapped it gotten it the worst.” storm stories. 5A flashlight and said, ‘Let’s get to the around himself and Rebecca, who After meeting with National Weather Service in- Tornados probably were not the culprit, he said, cellar,’ ” said Thomas Blackwood. was in pajamas. PHOTO PAGE: How nature left its vestigators who had done a field survey Wednesday because damage to most structures was on the wind- As they rushed through the bed- They rushed for the back door mark in York and Chester afternoon, officials determined the storm was most ward side of the buildings. room door, an enormous oak tree and stepped out into pouring rain. counties. 1B likely “straight-line winds” of up to 90 mph. “Safety, with all these power lines down, is first crashed through the roof and land- Barefoot, they pushed aside fallen ONLINE: See video of damage to a The same storm line running northwest to south- priority for all of us,” Murphy said. “From what we ed on their bed. tree limbs and stumbled over de- Lowrys turkey farm, plus more east damaged western York County and areas in have seen so far, this is the worst we have had since “It fell right where we were ly- North Carolina, said Eddie Murphy, Chester Coun- photos. ing,” Thomas said. See ESCAPE ● 5A ty’s emergency management director. See CHESTER COUNTY ● 6A

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