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2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation
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2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation

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Collegiate winners of the 2014 S.C. Press Association Collegiate Contest!

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2015 SCPA Collegiate Awards Presentation

  1. 1. NEWS STORY Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Ashley Sprouse the yard22 the ya 13.5 2 $9.5Human trafficking generates $9.5 billion yearly in the United States. (The United Nations) The average age for a minor’s entry into prostitution is between 13 and 14 years old in the U.S. (U.S. Department of Justice) human trafficking in the lowcountry What comes to mind when you hear the word “slavery?” If it’s an image of a dark skinned man plowing a field in the antebellum South, then you’re not alone. However, modern slavery takes a different form. Unbeknownst to many, slavery is one of largest international crime industries in the world, generating 32 billion dollars a year. More people today than ever before are enslaved. Human trafficking is a form of modern day slavery defined under U.S. federal law as minors involved in sex trade, adults who are coerced or deceived into commercial sex acts and anyone forced into labor work. Sex and labor trafficking are the most common forms. The crime’s international scale brings to mind hallmark countries like Thailand, but it happens right here in the United States – even in Charleston. “It is very hard to convince people that human trafficking goes on in the Charleston area,” said Sister Mary Thomas Neal, a local nun who has served as liaison to the United Nations. “I think it’s because they don’t want to believe it. However, in conscience, every one of us should be aware that human trafficking is happening.” South Carolina Sheds Dirty Dozen Reputation When South Carolina officials became aware of trafficking in the Palmetto State, they began to push corrective legislation. CaraLee Murphy, East Coast Director of the sex- trafficking prevention and victim restoration nonprofit A21 Campaign, said, “In December of 2012, South Carolina passed H. 3757 and it’s a phenomenal law.” Prior to H. 3757, South Carolina was in the Polaris Project, a leading organization that combats human trafficking and modern-day slavery, as well as the Dirty Dozen, which names the twelve states with the weakest trafficking laws. “We had a terrible law,” Murphy said. “There wasn’t a lot of awareness. So when [H. 3757] passed, Polaris Project named us the most improved state within that year.” The new trafficking law states that those found guilty of trafficking persons will have their assets liquidated and restitution must be paid to the victim. In addition, the law created the Human Trafficking Task Force, whose main goal is to combat trafficking in South Carolina by raising awareness, educating law enforcement and creating goals to fix any known problems. While South Carolina has improved legally, there are still no Safe Harbor Laws, which offer legal protection and care services for minors. Often minors are left with records and memories that haunt them. “I have certainly seen how it has been harder for our victim Hannah* to get a job and move forward with her life because she has this record... Even if she were to find a job that didn’t require a background search or didn’t ask questions about previous legal entanglements, a quick Google search would bring up her past. She is trying to move forward and her past is holding her down,” Allison Wagner, Legal Coordinator for A21 Campaign said. Although enslavement of minors is an especially poignant issue, there is currently not any corrective legislation being pushed forward. The Palmetto State may have lost the Dirty Dozen title, but there is still some dirt on our hands. by ASHLEY SPROUSE 23february 20 A trafficker can potentially make $150,000-$200,000 per victim each year. The average trafficker or pimp has four to six girls. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children) How Trafficking Happens Trafficking victims and the methods that lure people into trafficking vary. According to Murphy, most local cases involved women sex trafficking victims from a variety of household and backgrounds. “Some have come from really great families and they got pulled into trafficking,” she said. “Some come from broken homes, and they were runaways. We’ve really been able to deal with just lots of different girls, but they’ve all been phenomenal.” Traffickers and pimps use a variety of methods to bring girls into trafficking, but one pattern stands out as the most common. “Men have come into their lives and really played up the relationship side of it,” Murphy said. “They’ve acted like a boyfriend, husband, lover or whatever that girlfriend needs for that peace then got her in trafficking.” Murphy calls this the “wooing” or the “lover boy” method. “The problem with the wooing and the lover boy is that then there’s this emotional aspect as well cause it really starts off as a relationship. They don’t really identify themselves as victims. They sometimes even go as far to defend him and his actions,” Murphy said. But as Murphy points out, each case is different. “You can never check the boxes and have everything be the same,” Murphy said. While women and girls are the primary victims, men are also trafficked. When asked if she has dealt with a case where a man was trafficked, Murphy said, “Not here but in our other offices. We have had a couple of labor trafficking cases go through and those involve men and women. And we’ve had one where the man was involved in sex trafficking. It’s not that it doesn’t happen [to men]. If it happens to the male population it typically happens to boys… so minors. It’s just much less known what happens with girls because girls are the majority of sex trafficking victims.” Traffickers can even be family. “I actually met a girl who was a trafficking survivor and her father got into debt by gambling and he would take her to sell her to pay off his debt. And that is trafficking,” Murphy said. It is important to remember that people who are being trafficked are not prostitutes. A trafficked person is being forced, while prostitutes can be willing. Murphy, however, is quick to point out that street prostitution is where A21 has found potential trafficked victims. Helping Hands When Murphy and other A21 team members took one of their girls to the Tease Blow Dry Bar on King Street, they learned just how supportive the community can be. “Our girl was about to face her trafficker in court, and we took her to Tease to make her feel good about herself and they donated the entire session to us,” Murphy said. When asked about how others can help Murphy said, “The first thing that I always say is to get the information. You have to know what you’re talking about. So read some statistics. I always encourage people to follow anti-human trafficking online. Polaris Project is great, IJM which is International Justice Mission. And they’re constantly releasing statistics and stories. And they release the findings of those studies, and then that’s how you find out about human trafficking.” “And then when you know about it, tell people about it. There are so many creative ways to share what’s going on in the world today in regards to human trafficking. You can always donate or give like the girl at Tease to donate that whole session to us was phenomenal. It meant the world to our girl. Every little bit helps. We can’t do everything, but we can all do something. The power of continued giving [is great] even if it’s just five, ten dollars a month. Be creative; use your talents and passion to support trafficked victims. They definitely need it. And then if you always want to get more involved you can always intern.” Even doing something small can still be doing something great.
  2. 2. NEWS STORY Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Addie Lawrence Have a little pride - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Upstate Pride sweeps Barnet Park
  3. 3. NEWS STORY Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Andrew Budgick Thisstorywasverywellwrittenandanswered allofmyquestions.Thiscouldhavebeen averydrystory,butthewritermadeit interesting.Theleadcaughtmerightaway. Greatjob!
  4. 4. NEWS STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Kyle Heck
  5. 5. NEWS STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Thad Moore
  6. 6. NEWS STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Hannah Jeffrey Thiswriterdidasolidjobbringingeverythingtogether.
  7. 7. FEATURE STORY Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Olivia Cohen 23april 17 behind the scenes A day in the life of the Physical Plant and Grounds by OLIVIA COHEN The Physical Plant and Grounds Department at the College of Charleston are responsible for the maintenance of all non-Residence Buildings and landscapes on campus. The Physical Plant, comprised of 15 shops, as well as Grounds, comprised of 15 people, have a huge presence on campus, and yet they remain anonymous to most students and faculty. Like any other profession, maintenance careers are comprised of highs and lows, accomplishments and challenges, and always a background story. The stories of every Physical Plant and Grounds employee would fill an entire magazine, but the following excerpts from the Recycling Shop, Plumbing Shop and Grounds provide some insight into the lives of those who operate behind the scenes to keep CofC running smoothly. RECYLING Carl Crews has been an advocate for environmentalism ever since his senior year of high school, in 1970, when he participated in the very first Earth Day celebration. Almost 40 years later, he works as the head of the Recycling Shop at the College of Charleston, turning an adolescent passion into a fulfilling career. He and his colleague, Jerome Smalls, are responsible for collecting recycling from every building on campus, not including Residence Halls. “You don’t sit around much,” he said. In a typical day, Crews will drop into dozens of buildings, making him the campus’ unofficial eyes and ears. “You get a steady change of scenery and you stay above the board of what’s going on,” he said. The Recycling Shop, which is really just a dynamic duo, does not stop on campus, though. After collecting the recycling from close to 90 buildings, Crews and Smalls drive to the recycling center on Romney Street, where they drop off the full bags. Plastic and glass recyclables are simply left at the center, but Crews and Smalls must tear open the paper and cardboard recycling bags and dump their contents. Sheets of paper may be light, but the combined labor is hard. “When it’s 95 degrees and you’re up in the recycling plant up the road, you start sweating at 7:00 and don’t stop sweating til 3:30,” Crews said. Despite the sweat, Crews said, “I like my part of recycling.” His job only gets bad when students and faculty throw away bottles that contain liquid. As milk from coffee cups sours and sugar from soda and tea attracts bugs, the job can become highly unpleasant, as Crews and Smalls must work despite the flies and stench. Liquids in the recycling bins also cause problems when Crews collects the bags. “A lot of the times when you pull The Grounds Department, made of just 15 people, is responsible for planting and maintaining all plants on campus. Photos by Wesley Vance.
  8. 8. FEATURE STORY Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Nicole DeMarco the yard16 G eorge Benson’s office is everything that comes to mind when you think of the President. Impressive, sentimental and detailed down to the Oriental rug. It was just a little bit messy, but that comes with the territory. His desk was pushed up against the far wall and a series of photographs of the cistern and the College through the years visually draw your attention - almost as much as the cozy seating area at front and center. Two small brushed velvet settees, and a gathering of armchairs all faced inwards creating an intimate setting for conversation and embodying all the characteristics of an 18th century French salon. Side tables were teeming with literature and delicate crystal candy dishes. If nothing else, (although the vintage furniture suggested otherwise), it was welcoming. I immediately sat in a velvet arm chair and took moment to take it all in. There was a sort of overwhelming and wonderful warmth in the room that could only be felt when sitting with a distant relative, perhaps catching up over tea. It’s possible it was also the sun shining through the traditional windows of Randolph Hall, but I’ll stick with the first one. Now I’m not a stranger to interviews; I’ve conducted many, and they are by far the best part of my job. I’m going to venture to say that this one was different, special even. I could sense Benson’s excitement over speaking with students, something he wishes he could do more of. He later admitted that one of his favorite things is the annual Pancakes with the President event, often held in contingence with exams. I’ve never been. Sure, I’ve listened to the President speak many times, in fact we all have, but this time was different. This was the first time I was able to talk personally with him. We discussed some of his accomplishments during his seven years as president. In case someone forgets one, there are multiple pages keeping track. Benson read off some, such as, streamlining the organizational structure of the institution, creating various new offices on campus including Legal Affairs and Governmental Relations (to name a few), and devising the 10 year strategic plan. With a PhD in decisions sciences from the University of Florida and an impressive resume serving in business schools across the country, it is not so surprising that the latter of the two is a huge source of pride for Benson. “I really do enjoy that sort of visionary process,” he said, on planning and strategizing for the future. Benson spoke passionately about one of his ongoing projects, the transformation of Dixie Plantation. The story My afternoon with the President “as you get older, a hundred years is really nothing. i’m now 67 and i can think back 50 years ago to when i was 17 and it’s like nothing, like it was yesterday,” president george benson said. it seems like yesterday that benson became the 21st president of the college of charleston in february 2007. nicole demarco sat down with the current president to discuss his accomplishments and look towards the future.
  9. 9. FEATURE STORY Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Courtney Eker Thisstoryisatotalpackage!Itoffersfresh,new content;andisinformative,entertainingand well-written.Theartisicingonthecake.Lovethe how-to.Itmademehungryformoreresearch onbeardos,whichiswhatagoodfeaturepiece shouldinspire. the yard16 ¡VIVA LOS BEARDOS! THE MAN BEHIND THE BEARDby COURTNEY EKER photos by STEPHANIE GREENE 17october 2 August 10, 2004 marks the last time that Professor Paul Roof picked up a razor and shaved his face. Since then, he has been growing, grooming, gelling and garnering public attention for his facial hair. Maybe you’ve taken one of his sociology classes. Maybe you’ve seen him around campus. Or maybe you’ve seen his face staring back at you as you take a swig from a can of a Holy City Follicle Brown brew. It doesn’t really matter how you know him, but it’s almost guaranteed what you know him for: his beard. Dr. Roof is not a new (bearded) face on the CofC campus. In fact, this semester marks his third time teaching at the College. And yes, he was the man in the news this summer for getting fired from Charleston Southern University because he appeared on a beer can. More on that later. The good news is that he’s back, beard and all. Initially, Roof worked at CofC beginning with a three year stretch from 2000-2003. At which time, Roof, originally from Columbia, decided to leave South Carolina and try something new. This takes us to where the beard began - Farmington, New Mexico. Roof was teaching at San Juan Community College when he made the decision never to shave his face again. Why? In college, when Roof realized that he was capable of growing a beard, he thought to himself, “This is going to be cool one day.” His girlfriend at the time did not agree. Roof said she made him shave his beard, and that, “while I was doing it, I felt emasculated–I did this for a girl.” From that day forward, Roof stopped shaving almost completely. Luckily, he found a wife who insisted he have a beard on their wedding day. Since the wedding, Roof has shaved a grand total of two times. After a couple years spent in the Southwest with his wife, the couple decided to return to Charleston in 2005 in order to settle down and start their family. Roof’s first child, KK, was born that fall. Meanwhile, the beard grew longer. After returning to South Carolina, Roof began developing a blueprint for a new club specifically created for those with interesting facial hair. In 2007, Roof founded the Holy City Beard and Moustache Society and is the current chair (to which Roof remarked, “I’m the Commander… How ‘bout that?”) Currently, this group is made up of 27 members and it’s still growing. The Holy City Beard and Moustache Society meets monthly at different bars around town. In addition to their monthly meetings, they travel to different cities or even countries for beard and moustache competitions. Roof said, “Here’s the thing with a beard competition, it’s an excuse to have a good time.” Just like any other type of competition, there are categories, judges, a scoring system and even costumes. Roof said, “It’s like a beauty competition.” The difference? More hair. Men of all ages participate in these competitions. Roof said men show up “that look like they’ve been in ‘Lord of the Rings’, without having gone through makeup.” Men with such voluminous beardage have to braid their hair for daily wear because it becomes an inconvenience. Roof explained that having a beard can make it seem like you’re wearing a napkin on your chest all the time. With a chuckle, Roof said, “There can be situations when facial hair isn’t the best thing–but beauty has a price.” Not all men at these competitions resemble Gandalf the Grey. Beard competitions can appeal to a younger crowd, too. For example, Dr. Roof is preparing to hand down the beard wax to one of his students here at CofC, Daniel Lowder, who has been growing his beard out for roughly seven months. Lowder hopes to join the society in the next couple years when his beard gets long enough, at which time he will participate in the “College Beard” division. But it’s not all hairspray and Pabst Blue Ribbon for these self-pronounced “beardos.” The Holy City Beard and Moustache Society hosts an annual competition here in Charleston that benefits the Center for Women, a charity for ovarian cancer research. Roof said that in the last five years, the club has raised close to $30,000 for ovarian cancer research. That’s not to say that the weekend of the competition, which typically takes place in the Spring, isn’t filled with tomfoolery. Roof said, “People come from all over. There’s people from all different incomes, ages and professions. It’s a community. People know me as ‘The Professor.’” Don’t think that this fun is only limited to men. Where’s the thrill without the occasional bearded lady? Introducing, the Whiskerina Category. It’s not necessarily STEP 1: Work some Got 2B Glued Flat-Iron Leave-In conditioner into the beard to loosen it up. Comb thoroughly and leave for 3-5 minutes. the yard18 STEP 2: Give the beard the “butt cut” (Split the beard in half down the middle). STEP 3: Use a blow dryer to blow while using a hefty amount of Got 2B Hairspray to spray the beard in a horizontal form. (Beardo’s note: “This is not healthy for your hair.”) STEP 4: Apply Got 2B Glued (a bearded man’s holy grail) while still using the blow dryer to form the hair. Roof reflects on his termination from Charleston Southern as being mad, sad and glad. the testosterone-imbalanced woman at the circus that you’re picturing in your head; whiskerinas are women who create beards out of assorted materials and compete in two categories: “Fake Creative” and “Fake Realistic.” Some notable “Fake Creative” beards include ones made of five O’cork Shadow (made of wine corks), Spongebeard Squarepants (made of sponge) or even a Paul Roof Holy City beard (made with beer cans to commemorate Dr. Roof’s famous image.) Roof said, “Whiskerinas are like groupies, the free-lovin’ souls that they are, but they get competitive too.” Many of you are probably wondering how exactly a beard is judged. In the competition, there is a variety of categories that cover a broad spectrum. Beards are judged in length and measured from the lower lip, color, density and personality. Men can wear their beards au natural, or they can choose to enter the freestyle competition, where they can style or gel their beards to take another form. This process includes assorted hairsprays, beard batters, beard savers, beard balms, pomades, leave- in conditioners and waxes. Unsurprisingly enough, the styling can take hours. This is Dr. Roof’s area of expertise. Coming from a man who has styled his beard into the form of the Liberty Bell (pendulum and all), Roof’s perspective on freestyling is not to be taken lightly. The precision in which Roof styles his facial hair has led him to a plethora of success in the Beardo world. In competitions, Roof takes all details into consideration. Trimming split ends. Taming “flyaways.” All the way down to the color of t-shirt that he wears, there is a very precise plan of action behind every time Roof stands before a judge. This precision in his art got Roof and his club featured in an episode of the TV show Whisker Wars (available on Netflix, in case curiosity gets the best of you). Roof, who has participated in numerous competitions since 2007, nationally and internationally, said, “Sometimes my wife and I go to the world championships as an anniversary trip, the two that we went to together were Alaska in 2009 and Norway in 2011.” Just last year, Roof took second place in the country for freestyle beard when he styled his facial hair to take the form of a giant pair of scissors. The 30 Minute Beard 19october 2 STEP 5: Take a glass cup of desired gerth and form hair around the circumference, all while using the heat from the blow dryer to set the mold of a curl around the glass. STEP 6: Pinch some moustache wax between your pointer finger and thumb and work it into the tips of the moustache hairs. Form accordingly. STEP 7: Expect to receive interesting looks while walking down the street. STEP 8: Lather, rinse and repeat with shampoo and conditioner until regular texture and form returns. That same winning style ended up on the can for the Holy City Follicle Brown brew. At the time that Roof’s image was placed on the beer can, he was working at Charleston Southern University. In the midst of the first week of classes during this past summer, Roof found out that he would no longer be teaching at the university due to the fact that his face (and the hair that comes with it) appeared on the alcoholic beverage. Roof commented, “Charleston Southern is a Southern Baptist school and they had a problem with that.” The beer can, which has since helped raise a significant amount of money for ovarian cancer research, can be purchased locally. Charleston Southern released a statement this summer saying that sometimes difficult decisions must be made for the school, because the values of Charleston Southern “are always paramount.” Apparently, Roof’s debut on the beer can did not fall under those values. Roof was teaching a class on a Thursday, and by the following Monday, that same class had a different professor. However, Roof is happy to be back at the College of Charleston. “The College and my colleagues here came to my support when I needed it and the College has been a part of my life since 2000. I don’t plan on leaving it again,” he said. But let’s get back to that beard. To Roof, it’s just hair that he takes care of. Like the rest of us, he washes it, shampooes it and conditions it just like in any regular beauty routine– with the exception of the daily application of beard oil. “But the interesting thing about a beard,” he said, “is how others perceive it and [let it] define you.” Roof pays close attention to the sociological attention that comes with having a beard. Many undertones of gender, grooming and beauty tend to surface pertaining to Roof’s scruffy appearance. Although he says it can become a master status, he also said that when he’s around town with his family, people don’t see him specifically for his facial hair, “they just see a dad with a beard.” As for his children, they’ve never known him any other way; the beard is older than they are. Roof’s second- born, Matthew (6) aspires to have his own moustache one day. As for now, Roof will continue keeping his promise to never shave again by growing out his beard until the day he dies. Roof said, “Hopefully at my funeral it will be very gray and I will have lived a long and productive life.” And with a glimmer of happiness in his eye and a grin broadening underneath the 14-inch-long scruff, I can’t help but believe that he’s on the right track. Beardos use enough beauty products to make a teenage girl swoon. Amidst the variety you’ll find pastes, sprays, creams, gels and waxes--all used for styling.
  10. 10. FEATURE STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Hannah Jeffrey
  11. 11. FEATURE STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Sarah Ellis
  12. 12. FEATURE STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Hannah Jeffrey Thebestofmanyverywell-writtenfeaturestories. Jeffreywriteswithcompassion,skillandinsight, providingacaptivatingportraitofanincredible youngwomandealingwithalife-changingevent.
  13. 13. ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT STORY Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Christina D’Antoni the yard34 EATINGfrom Bay to Broad East Bay and Broad; these are the streets that shape our city. Geographically, they split the peninsula into boroughs, namely Ansonborough and South of Broad. Historically, they signify Charleston’s great centers of commerce and jurisdiction. And culturally, they define and complicate this beautiful city we live in. King Street and Battery Park clog tourist pamphlets and receive notoriety for their commercial beauty and charm, but as we Charlestonians know, there is so much more to this peninsula held on the backs of these boroughs and their less nationally acclaimed locations. Anyone can feel it, walking down King, Broad, East Bay or Meeting – that premonition that each side street passed is a missed opportunity, capable of both sunny sojourns and twilight secrets, a “maybe later,” a forlorn feeling. And this doesn’t stop at strolling, shopping or, of course, eating. There are restaurants and specialty shops from Bay to Broad that the neighbors know, and are waiting for you to visit… East Bay St., originally just “Bay,” has a certain marshy stillness to it, as if you drove and drove miles to the shore and you arrived to a quietness. But in Charleston, this happens in a matter of minutes and intersections. As you walk down Calhoun towards East Bay, there isn’t a single hint that you’re coming closer to the edge until you look straight ahead and the buildings start to grow larger and more sparse. East Bay and its surrounding Ansonborough have a subtlety found less so on the rest of the peninsula. There is no air of pretension or as many historic porticos, but there are wealths of local seafood and meats. Ted’s Butcherblock sits back in a strip mall off East Bay, and looks anything but charming. But as you walk in, you see the packed cases of meats and realize you’re not just in any sandwich shop or deli. Owner Ted Dombrowski stocks the shop by CHRISTINA D’ANTONI, photos by STEPHANIE GREENE from Bay to Broad with cheese, artisanal bacon (for the bacon of the month BLT) and a selection of wines. The bbq pulled pork panini stands out as the customer favorite, with house-smoked heritage pork, cheddar cheese slaw and house bbq sauce. And of course, their gouda mac & cheese, stuffed into plastic cups on almost every customer’s table. Making your way down the street, you’ll find that 289 East Bay is no longer painted the color of orange juice, but white with steel, now 167 Raw. CofC alumni, Jesse Sandole and Kyle Norton, opened their gourmet seafood market and cafe as a second location and companion to their family seafood market in Nantucket. Sandole states, “Charleston has an incredible food culture, [and] we wanted to bring the concept of a fish market/restaurant to town because it’s a bit different than what people are used to experiencing...we’re bringing in all the best seafood we can find from up and down the East Coast which makes for an exciting dynamic in our kitchen. Our menu is small and simple but by having the seafood case at our disposal we’re able to change it everyday.” And they do. Customers come by cars and by foot to 167 Raw to scope out the case and take home boxes of scallops or tuna poke and chips for dinner, or to serve as sides. Its Ansonborough’s neighborhood seafood jaunt, and it feels very at home there. 35october 2 OPINION the yard36 Tucked onto Church Street, right off of Broad under a black awning is the very quaint fromagerie, goat. sheep. cow. The shop carries over 200 types of cheeses from both the U.S. and Europe, and with cheese lovers in and out daily, goat. sheep. cow. began to make a “sandwich of the day” to appease them. Patty Floersheimer, a co-owner, commented, “It seem[ed] to work as we did not want to become a sandwich shop but still wanted to give our clientele what they asked for.” Daily sandwiches with ingredients like Finocchiona, marinated feta cheese, roasted red peppers and local arugula are now hot-items at goat.sheep.cow., and while most of their sandwich customers “were regulars who live[d] and work[ed] in the neighborhood,” Floersheimer said, “Now we seem to reach well beyond these boundaries.” Broad Street is stately, there’s no denying it. Maybe it’s the large churches, or the Greek Revival of the Four Corners of Law, but most likely it’s because (at least historically) it has the broadest streets in Charleston. Art galleries feel dignified here, and so does really every building that seems to tower over you, making walking down the street a humbling experience. A couple blocks away on Broad, Gaulart & Maliclet, known lovingly as “Fast and French,” is really anything but fast and plainly French. In an interview with Manager Lawrence Mitchell covering everything from gazpacho to the original founders’ philosophies, he divulged the nickname is less about the food and more of a play on a certain artistic lifestyle. Mitchell states, “We continue to want to be the place that people can come to every day.” At community tables with a total of 33 seats in house, there are “students, artists, tourists, and then you have jurors, clergy, and lawyers. We don’t stick to a category, but it’s really an interesting place where all that mingles...the whole place is designed as a social experiment – bringing people together.” With low prices (Try the Croq’ Monsieur for $4.10 or the O’Rye for $8.25), and a wide variety, Fast and French is 30 years strong and somewhat of a Broad Street institution. Mitchell said, “We’re always thinking about how to take care of the [Fast and French] building. We’re married to our building. We’d never leave.”married to our building. We’d never leav ouple blocks away on Broad, Gaular
  14. 14. ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT STORY Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Elaine Best “How To Be A Lesbian in 10 Days or Less” at Wofford Last spring, when the South Carolina House of USC Upstate, South Caroli- na was a warzone between - - - At the conference, theatre in 10 Days or Less” but the - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - State newspaper that the - - ternal pressure” but was - - with the chancellor about - - - - - - - - While the center has - ther she nor the center are trying to recruit anyone into professor in the Depart- - - - - - ies help people open their - - not only an opportunity but - country that art in South - - - - onates because it is about - - el, senior Courtney Parsons, - - - - - - - - - ognizing their own fears in - - Private college takes a stand in the name of academic freedom
  15. 15. ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT STORY Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Addie Lawrence Thispiecewasverywell-written.The readercouldclearlyenvisionwhat washappeningduetothevivid detailsandstorytelling.Nottolong, justenough.Welldone! Adventures in Albania The sky opens up as we exit the gorge, my clothes soaked, my hands scratched of sheep graze. When we approach the approaches the sheep, defending the the dogs, an inch away, snaps at us as a shepherd cracks a tree branch against the ground. The dogs return to their master, but growl as we pass. Albania, for three years. We follow her that protected us in the gorge. The dogs helmet, and I hand it to her; she swings the helmets at the dogs. They step back, and we stand our ground. Ansley instructs us to keep moving. were just herding us, like they do to the We trek back to the small town of Erseke. It’s surrounded by mountains on all sides, and cars and horses share the only paved road. We’ve just tested the where counselors will take up to 30 high school students through the water. It’s at this camp that I’ve decided to spend a month of my summer. I do everything from working the high ropes course to washing hundreds of dishes. Albania is in a period of revival and re- an atheist state, and religion was perse- cuted. An electric fence lined the bor- der. Now, bomb shelters are empty and overgrown, stripped of their metal. Reli- alike, with about 60 percent of Albanians camp counselors, on a near-daily basis. She’s bilingual in English and in the na- girl, and her darker skin has been the target of ridicule from her peers. The Roma are a nomadic group of during the Holocaust and across Europe each other’s company. “The girls want to know why they can’t talk to any of the boys, but they can’t. They’re Roma girls. Their mothers English-speaking counselors. The girls, aged 11 to 15, are at mar- riageable age. Any contact with boys is taboo and dangerous; simply visit- ing a boy’s home could have them wed locked. Husbands control divorce, and most of the girls won’t receive any kind them out of the house for burning food or cleaning poorly, the girls will most likely be forced to remarry. On our way back from the gorge, grasshoppers pelt our legs. It’s the sea- son of their awakening, and they’ve bur- We’ve just climbed a rock face, tossing stones from the ledges to keep the dogs away. They linger for a moment before Back in the gorge, I’m standing at into the pool of water, churned white When I do, I have a moment, rising out of the water and catching my breath, where I feel fearless.
  16. 16. ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT STORY Over 5,000 Division HONORABLE MENTION: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Manny Correa
  17. 17. ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Belvin Olasov
  18. 18. ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Tiger Clemson University Stu Pennebaker Lena Dunham, creator and star of the hit HBO series “Girls,” is celebrated for being outspoken, a feminist and not at all afraid to express herself. So, when she published a memoir of sorts, the world was expecting honesty and humor. And honesty and humor we got — but so much more. “Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She’s ‘Learned’” is — not surprisingly — hilarious. Dunham is well known for the awkward humor that is “Girls”, and this element was mirrored in her book. “Not That Kind of Girl” includes anecdotes about Dunham’s earliest experiences with dating — one such incident involving instant messaging a boy named Igor in the ninth grade. All teenagers of the early 2000s can recall, usually with a cringe, our experiences with instant messaging, and Dunham captures this inelegant form of adolescent flirtation in a uniquely funny way. “Not That Kind of Girl” also contains several belly laugh inducing lists, such as “What’s in My Bag” (“An eyebrow pencil because I tweezed my eyebrows like every child of the 90’s”) and “18 Unlikely Things I’ve Said Flirtatiously” (“I’m obsessed with the curtains in your van!”). This book is a compilation of the weird, wacky and insanely funny, but it is also a woman’s honest take on how hard life can be. Dunham is not writing as a celebrity; she’s writing as a 28-year-old who loves life and all of its quirks — one who is being honest about the difficulties that life can entail. “Not That Kind of Girl” is truth in its most raw form. Dunham writes candidly about therapy and her relationship with her psychiatrist. She describes her experience with rape honestly and openly, allowing her readers to understand how lasting the effects of this tragedy are. In addition, she discusses her sometimes- volatile relationships with men, her struggle with her body and her HPV infection. These are serious topics, and Dunham takes a serious tone when discussing them, but never does she sugarcoat the events of her life. By including intense but important issues in her memoir, which also consists of funny, lighthearted stories, Dunham makes subjects that society sometimes avoids discussing accessible and easier to talk about. Dunham isn’t afraid to be honest. She tells the world embarrassing, funny and sad stories about her life because she wants her readers to understand that that’s what life is: it’s the Stu Pennebaker Asst. TimeOut Editor times we laugh and the times we cry, and no experience is too strange or too silly to share. “Not That Kind of Girl” is entertaining and a great read, but it’s more than that. This book is the beginning of a discussion today’s women want — and need — to have. “Not That Kind Of Girl”
  19. 19. ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Katie West Thewriteransweredthe“fiveWs”andkept thereaderinterested.Thewritingtechniqueis well-developedandengagesthereader.
  20. 20. SPORTS STORY Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Clayton Thompson
  21. 21. SPORTS STORY Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Jason Lutz the yard14 helping me stay positive]. I was never allowed to quit anything as a kid. When the injury happened, my mom told me I would have to have surgery and then she told me that I had to make my mind up to do my best to comeback.” But even after the surgery and the beginning of therapy, the worst part for Hall was watching his team continue the season without him. “Your best buds are out there playing and you can’t do a thing about it. And you want to get better because it’s your health, but the worst thing is not playing. And I think that drove me the most, wanting to get back on the court better than I left it.” Coming back from a major knee procedure like ACL surgery is not easy by any stretch. When Hall finally made his return to the court at the beginning of the 2012-2013 season, it took some time for him to readjust. Coming off the bench for the first few games, Hall struggled to find a rhythm within the offense. During the Charleston Classic Tournament, Hall only scored a total of 10 points in three games. He bounced back in a big way in the Cougars’ next game against 21st ranked Baylor, scoring a team high 12 points and grabbing six rebounds. Hall finished the 2012-2013 season sixth on the team in scoring (7.7) and second in rebounding (6.4). The Cougars had an impressive season, going 24-11 under new head coach Doug Wojick following the retirement of Coach Cremins. The team’s season came to an end in the Southern Conference title game against Davidson, in which Hall was held to only two points and three rebounds. It was certainly an up and down season for Hall, but he did not necessarily view his personal performance as a disappointment. “The only reason I would say it wasn’t a great year was because we didn’t win the [Southern Conference] championship. We had a first year head coach with a brand new system and new players and that’s a huge chemistry no- no. We only lost seven games [in regular season play] and made it to the SoCon final, so I would say it was a pretty good year.” After failing to secure a bid to the NCAA tournament in the Southern Conference Championship, Charleston moved over to the Colonial Athletic Association for Hall’s final season. The move to the CAA was fueled by the opportunity to play better competition and gain more national exposure, which the men’s basketball team certainly has. Before the season began, the NBC Sports Network closed a deal with the CAA to broadcast a majority of conference games. With that agreement between the CAA and NBC, the Cougars have been on national television three times, not including the three times during the Wooden Legacy Tournament. With the new competition and more time on the road, the Cougars faced an inevitable adjustment period in their new conference. And while the team was getting prepared to face all new opponents, Hall was readying himself for a big senior season. “I think what is key is that it’s my Hall in action as the Cougars’ star forward. Photo by Colin Johnson. 15february 20 second year in this new system and I have experience under my belt with it. If you think about it, we were all kind of freshmen last year with a new coaching staff. This year we have more experience, we know what we are going to do, so it’s been a confidence booster for the team and I.” Hall has had a terrific season so far in his final year, averaging nearly 13 points and over nine rebounds, both of which are team highs. He has recorded eight games of at least 10 points and 10 rebounds, including two games of 17+ rebounds. Coach Wojick has relied upon Hall to be one of their offensive focal points and Wojick has not been disappointed. “Willis has to play well for us. Actually, the better he shoots the ball from three, the better it is for the whole team,” commented Wojick when asked about Hall’s consistency this season. “Willis gets a lot done based on effort, and he plays big minutes and I am going to go to him. It’s really important that your best players play the best, and he is one of those best players.” As the team comes down the stretch in the season and pushes towards their inaugural CAA tournament, Hall knows his career in maroon and white is coming to a close and reflected on his favorite moments as a player. “My first game against Coastal Carolina. I got to start in my first college game, which is my best memory. I had never been nervous in my life before that day. I had a double-double, but also shot a three that didn’t even touch the rim. You can also never forget that win against [North Carolina] my freshman year [at TD Arena]. I had all good years here and it’s been a fun ride.” Although his days are numbered as a player at Charleston, Hall hopes basketball is still in his future. “It’s one of those things where you need the right opportunity, and I hope to take advantage of that if it’s there. I would love to work in the front office of the NBA, and one-day hope to be a team’s general manager. Wherever that path can take me, whether it’s coaching or a video coordinator, I’d be ready for that experience.” But before he leaves the College, Hall hopes the team has one last run towards a conference title and a bid to the NCAA tournament. And as a fifth year senior, someone who Coach Wojick has referred to as “the old man,” Hall is prepared to put the team on his back and lead the Cougars as far as the journey will take them. “Willis gets a lot done based on effort, and he plays big minutes and I am going to go to him. It’s really important that your best players play the best, and he is one of those best players.” Coach Wojick (Left): Willis Hall enjoys breakfast at Jack’s Cafe. (Right): Hall and his brother, Judson, both play basketball for the College. Photos by Colin Johnson.
  22. 22. SPORTS STORY Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Jason Lutz Thebest-writtenstorysubmitted.Anicejob ofaddingGardner’sloveofCofCandthe cityofCharleston. the yard12 Starting from the bottom: Brett Gardner’s rise to stardom Brett Gardner, former student athlete for the College, plays for the Yankees. Photo courtesy of The New York Yankees, all rights reserved. It was a tie ballgame in extra innings on a warm July night. Fifty-seven thousand fans were on their feet at Yankee Stadium, ready for their Bronx Bombers to beat the rival Boston Red Sox. Up to bat came a five foot, 11 inch kid, just seven days into his major league career. Fans prayed that the “new guy” would simply get on base, which would give Yankee superstar Derek Jeter a chance to drive in the winning run. The rookie had another idea: to send the fans home knowing his name. For one-time College of Charleston standout, Brett Gardner, that summer night in 2008 on national television was his big introduction to the major leagues. With a dramatic walk-off hit against the most hated team in Yankees country, he proved he could play on the biggest stage of all. “It was pretty surreal. That is still one of my favorite moments in my career. Just to be able to come through like that for your teammates, especially the ones that have been there for ten, fifteen, or even more years, it’s hard for younger guys to come and fit in, so that was big for me,” Gardner said. Gardner, however, was never on the fast track to the major leagues. In fact, he was far from it when he arrived at Charleston in the fall of 2001. by JASON LUTZ 13april 17 The Tryout Gardner was not recruited out of Holly Hill, S.C., but he attended the Charleston baseball team’s open tryout- without a guaranteed spot on the team. “I could always run. I was undersized, probably 150 or 160 pounds at the time. I didn’t have a strong throwing arm, and wasn’t going to turn heads in batting practice,” he said. After his initial tryout, Charleston’s head coach at the time, John Pawlowski, did not think they had a spot on the team for Gardner. There were, however, a few things about him that caught Pawlowski’s eye. “Brett was kind of hidden over there in Holly Hill. We invited him to walk-on tryouts, and you have those tryouts not knowing what you’re going to see or who will show up. I remember we set up the 60-yard dash on our backfield. I remember Brett running it and I think he ran it in 6.5 [seconds]. That was a tool that really stood out. So we evaluated everything and eventually called him back out,” Pawlowski said. Gardner acknowledged that, aside from the running aspect, the tryout did not go too well. “I guess the tryout went okay. I think if you put me in the same tryout today, I still wouldn’t do that great. But I was fortunate the way things worked out. We had outfielders that got injured who were supposed to play big parts on the team. I went from basically not making the team, to barely making the team, to playing over 40 games my freshman season,” he said. Gardner possessed a gritty, passionate personality that was attractive to the coaches, a similar type of intensity he employs today in the major leagues. “He had to play with a bigger chip on his shoulder. It started when he stepped foot on the [Charleston] campus because nobody knew about him. He was flying about as well under the radar as you could. So when he got his opportunity, one of his best attributes was that he was going to walk off that field with his uniform dirty and play as hard as he could every single day to prove that not only did he belong, but this kid wanted to play at the next level too,” Pawlowski said. Gardner attributed his hard-working attitude to his father, but also noted that he was always a self-motivator as a young player. “I would say my dad pushed me. He always taught me to play hard and to play the game the right way. I feel like I have always been somebody who has been pretty self-motivated and didn’t need someone to remind me that I had to play hard. I have just always enjoyed playing the game of baseball. I’ll be the first to admit that there are guys out there that are more talented than me, but I found out one of the ways that I can bridge the gap is to try to play harder and smarter than them, and at the end of the day, don’t have any regrets,” he said. Thankfully for everyone involved with Charleston baseball, Pawlowski and the coaches recognized that passion for the sport and gave Gardner a spot on the team. Budding Stardom During his time in a Cougars uniform, Gardner was named to two All-Southern Conference teams in 2004 and 2005 and earned a spot on All-American third team in 2005. In Charleston baseball history, Gardner ranks first in runs (214), steals (97), and sacrifices (53). He is second all-time in both hits (297) and triples (16), while sporting a .368 career batting average. After leading the Cougars to the NCAA Regionals during his junior season, both Gardner and his coaches were surprised that he was not selected in the MLB Draft. “After his junior year, it kind of surprised everyone that he wasn’t drafted. So I told him, ‘Alright you just got to come and keep working,’ and next thing you know, he got drafted [the following year] and the rest is history,” Pawlowski said. Luckily, Gardner took Pawlowski’s advice and continued to work hard. He concluded his final collegiate season top in the nation in several categories. He finished tied first overall in hits (122), second in runs (85), third in batting average (.447), fourth in sacrifice hits (17), and seventh in stolen bases (38). Gardner scores a run. Photo courtesy of College of Charleston Athletics Communications. the yard14 The Yankees drafted him in the third round after the 2005 collegiate baseball season and he left Charleston for the minor leagues. “I was fortunate to play for some great coaches and play with great teammates. Prior to my time, the College of Charleston baseball program wasn’t on the map and then the program completely turned around. We played hard and we were able to make it to [NCAA] Regionals in 2004 for the first time, which I remember quite well. I wish I could go back and relive that time because it was a lot of fun,” he said. In 2006, Gardner became an all-star in Class-A for the Tampa Yankees during his first full season in the minors, leading the Florida State League in batting average (.323). He was promoted to the Double-A Trenton Thunder in 2007, where he batted .300 and stole 18 bases before being called up to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Gardner impressed scouts with his speed and ability to get on base in the minor leagues. He was eventually called up to majors in June 2008- in almost the exact way he joined Charleston - as the Yankees were battling a plethora of injuries to outfielders. In Gardner’s first full season, the Yankees won the 2009 World Series, something he could never have even dreamed about. “I could have never ever anticipated [winning the World Series]. I always dreamed of it, but things don’t usually end up the way you dream about it. I was very fortunate and blessed to have been put in the position I am in. But if everything ended today, I can say that I am very happy with the way my career has gone and the way I have progressed. Not a lot of guys can say they were drafted by the Yankees and then been called up to play for the Yankees. I just hope I still have a long time left here in New York,” he said. It seems as if Gardner will have plenty of time left with the Yankees. After posting career highs in hits, home runs, RBIs, and slugging percentage in 2013, he signed a four year extension in February to continue to roam the Yankee Stadium outfield until at least 2018. Journey in Perspective As many could imagine, Gardner has a tough time describing his incredible journey in just a few words. “I would just have to say that it has gone by really fast. It has been a rollercoaster, a lot of ups and a lot of downs. I am very proud of what I have accomplished, but it definitely does not feel like it has been as long as it has been since I was at Charleston. It has been almost nine years since I was drafted. It has flown by, but like they say, time does fly when you are having fun,” he said. Gardner is an anomaly at the College. Although the school has made its way onto the national stage since the early 2000s, Charleston has not had many students go on to play professional sports in a major league, especially with the level of success that Gardner has achieved. The College has had over 45 players selected in the MLB draft, but Gardner remains the highest draft pick of all time. “I mean, we saw the speed and the ability, it just wasn’t polished yet. With four years in Charleston and obviously the development he had in the Yankees’ system, now he’s a bonafide major league outfielder, playing centerfield for the New York Yankees. That’s a pretty special journey,” Pawlowski said. Gardner starred at the College from 2001 to 2005. Photos courtesy of College of Charleston Athletics Communications. 15april 17 So what type of advice does Gardner have for Charleston athletes looking to one day break into the pros in any sport? “I am a few classes shy of getting my degree. I don’t want to say it is a regret, but the fact that I haven’t finished [school] yet, although I certainly plan on doing so as I am playing or right when I finish playing. I would tell them to focus on academics as well. I have been fortunate that baseball has worked out pretty well for me, but if baseball hadn’t worked out, I’m not sure what my back up plan would have been. So I would get your degree, and then hopefully if you get some breaks, it will work out professionally in your sport,” he said. Gardner has not cut Charleston out of his life, either. Although he is playing in New York, he tries to return to Charleston as much as possible and had high praise for the College and the city. “It is a great city. We are surrounded by a lot of great culture and great history, not just with the College of Charleston, but also within the city of Charleston. Students enjoy their time in the city. It is a beautiful city, a great place for baseball, and I always love going back there in the offseason,” he said. Gardner is plenty thankful for his big break to play in the major leagues. He has had the benefit of playing with and against some of the greatest athletes in the world, including Yankees legends in Jeter and Mariano Rivera, which is something he attributes to his success. “As a younger guy coming up with the Yankees, I’ve been around guys like Derek [Jeter] and Mariano [Rivera]. Those guys have been around for so long that they know how to help the young kids fit in. I think that they led to some of the success I had early on and gave me the ability to stick around. Being able to talk to and be around those guys and see how they conduct their business not only on the field, but also off the field, it has been really great,” he said. A storied College of Charleston athlete. The New York Yankees starting left fielder. A World Series champion. Has a nice ring to it, doesn’t it? Gardner recently signed a new contract with the Yankees through 2018. Photo courtesy of The New York Yankees, all rights reserved.
  23. 23. SPORTS STORY Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Thad Moore and Danny Garrison
  24. 24. SPORTS STORY Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Sarah Ellis
  25. 25. SPORTS STORY Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Carolina Reporter University of South Carolina Isabelle Khurshudyan Multi-sourced,easyandenjoyableread.
  26. 26. EDITORIAL WRITING Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Sara Frances Koontz I Want to Ride My Bicycle; I Want to Ride My Bike Bringing a piece of Copenhagen’s bike culture back home - - - - - - - - - -
  27. 27. EDITORIAL WRITING Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Collegian Bob Jones University Samantha Loucks
  28. 28. EDITORIAL WRITING Under 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Paladin Furman University Sidney Dills Theclearwinner.Aneditorialisfrequently aboutthepapertakingastrongstance,evenif controversial,andbackingitupwithreasoned analysis.Thiswritercamefromaplaceofangerto combataprobleminhis/hercampuscommunity.
  29. 29. EDITORIAL WRITING Over 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Kathleen Schipano
  30. 30. EDITORIAL WRITING Over 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University Adarrell Gadsden
  31. 31. EDITORIAL WRITING Over 5,000 Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Ben Crawford Theclearwinnerinthecategory.Writeris unafraidtocalloutadministration’shandling ofanissue.Verywell-writtenandreasonedtake onanissueofimportancetostudents.
  32. 32. COLUMN WRITING PORTFOLIO Open Division THIRD PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Olivia Cohen
  33. 33. COLUMN WRITING PORTFOLIO Open Division SECOND PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Benjamin Crawford
  34. 34. COLUMN WRITING PORTFOLIO Open Division FIRST PLACE: Old Gold & Black Wofford College Elaine Best Thesewereclever,amusing,yetentirelybelievable. IapplaudElaine’scasualwritingstylethatnever relinquishedauthoritywhilemakingmelaugh. NEEDALITTLEBLACK&BLUE? Pain, pity and purgatory: the plight of paper writing The paper rush is of- ficially upon the Wof- ford student body. Papers are being as- signed left and right on subjects ranging from lab reports on bacteria to the histori- cal significance of the sans-culottes during the French Revolu- tion. And while the students have, of course, kept up with all of their readings and notes, these pa- pers still seem to make students scratch their heads in confusion and bang their heads against the wall in frustration. How do you handle all these emotions when writ- ing a paper? Below are some tips on how to push through the pain, pity and purga- tory that comes with writing a paper. 1. Do you know what style you’re supposed to be writing in? Chi- cago? MLA? APA? YMCA? Take a good look at what class the paper is for and make sure you get the for- matting right. Science professors most likely will not like Chicago style on lab reports. Everyone but psychol- ogy professors will probably dislike you for using APA style. Granted, this opin- ion is tainted with the views of a history ma- jor who battled with Psych 150 lab reports last year, but I digress. 2. The first step is al- ways acceptance. Ex- cept, of course, when it comes to papers. Then, it is denial all the way. Don’t think about how much time you were given to write this pa- per. Don’t mull over how much reading on the sans-culottes you didn’t do. Don’t start questioning your life choices up to this point. Denial is your friend, and it’s what is going to get you through this assign- ment. 3. Wallow in self-pity for a good two hours. Find yourself caught up in a “Pretty Little Liars” marathon. Be- gin to regret your life decisions up to this point. Continue to be mystified by the sans- culottes. 4. Avoid working on the paper for as long as possible. If you don’t think about it, it makes sense. 5. Now that it’s the night before the paper is due, commence to have a big melt down. Should you even be double majoring in government and Eng- lish? What are you doing in college? Do you really want to go to grad school? Who are you? What is the meaning of life? 6. Do a lot of small, unimportant tasks be- fore you actually start writing the paper. Why not get a head start on your readings for religion next week? And why not catch up on a few chores while you’re up and about? Go tackle those dishes you’ve left piled up for about a week (or two. Maybe three, you lost count). Knit that sweater, braid that friendship bracelet you’ve been mean- ing to make since the eighth grade, polish the microwave be- cause, I mean, why not? Do everything you can to feel accom- plished in all other aspects of your life to make up for the giant void that has become your paper. 7. Now that you are actually, finally going to start writing your paper, start with the basics. Come up with a clever title — the more puns the more fun. By spending an obscene amount of time coming up with a title, you get to feel accomplished in the fact that you are in- deed working on your paper without actually having to start on the nitty-gritty details of your assignment. 8. Take a good look at your prompt. Look away. Look back again. Look away. Look back. 9. Realize it’s probably time to get some caf- feine so you can focus a little more on the as- signment at hand. 10. Try looking at your prompt again to gauge its vagueness. Are there terms used in the prompt that you have never heard of before? Exactly how much summary is in a “brief summary?” Does your professor want more comparing or more contrasting? How ex- actly are you supposed to write eight pages on the historical sig- nificance of the sans- culottes in revolution- ary France? What is a sans-culottes? What are you doing in col- lege? Who are you? What is the meaning of life? 11. Whether you un- derstand what you’re writing about or not, proceed to string words into sentences and sentences into paragraphs. You may not know what you are doing, but at least it’s turning into some- thing. Once you finally have a draft done, curl up in a blanket on the ground and rock back and forth for a little bit. The worst is over. The sun is rising, and your paper is finished. by Elaine Best, contributing writer an amateur analysis of the Winter Olympics by Elaine Best, contributing writer Most people understand the basics of popular sports such as soccer, baseball, basketball, football and Netf- lix binge-watching. But when it comes to winter sports, Americans seem to be at a loss. Biatholon? Nordic com- bined? Skeleton? These names sound more like punk bands than athletic games. Many of us were put to the test with our winter-sports-knowledge during the recent Win- ter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. As an experiment, I decided to test my observational skills during this time and try to relay what I gathered from these events back to the public. And so, without looking up the official rules or terminolo- gy, I will proceed to describe the Winter Olympics of 2014. The Opening Ceremony: It consisted of a little girl sleep-walking through Russian history with a time-trav- eling kite. No one seemed concerned that a little girl was walking around during war times or around heavy ma- chinery. No one seemed to question why the Kremlin was made of balloons. No one seemed frightened by the animatronic livestock hovering in the sky. To end the cer- emony, only four of the five snowflakes opened, creating unnecessarily long rants on Twitter. Thus, the Olympics began. Women’s Snowboard Cross: Here is what I know about it: 1. The snowboarders wear bibs. Not baby bibs. Olym- pic bibs. 2. This sport is unpredictable. Someone will be in first place and then suddenly wipeout. You have no idea who is going to win at any point in the race, making it the worst sport to gamble on. 3. Eva Samkova, the gold medalist of the event, wore a fake mustache for the competition. Award: Women’s Snowboard Cross gets “9/10 Back Off Men” because Samkova pulled off that facial hair bet- ter than any man could have. Bobsledding: No one named Bob was sledding, and I’m sad to say that I let my disappointment about this fact taint my views. It was repetitive. Two people not named Bob would push the sled forward, hop into the sled and then drive it down an icy tunnel. Again and again and again. The most exciting moment was getting to see the Ja- maican bobsled team. Unfortunately, they didn’t get gold, but they were definitely the crowd favorites. Award: Bobsledding gets a “1/10 Wouldn’t Do It Again.” Not exactly a good spectator sport. No one even put on a mustache. And no one was named Bob. Alpine Skiing: Alpine Skiing was an educational ex- perience for me. For one, it taught me that no one looks good in a full latex body suit. No one. Secondly, I learned that not everything is explained by the announcers during an Olympic event. For example, I was able to figure out that the sport consisted of a bunch of guys trying to ski as fast as they could down a hill, but the one thing that I could not figure out was the flags. Flags were randomly placed in various locations on the edge of the path throughout the track. Sometimes the skiers would tap them with their poles. Other times they would not. The flags’ significance was never clearly defined. Did the skiers gain points for hitting the flags? Did they lose points? Were they sending secret Morse code signals to government spies? Is there some tradition where every time a skier hits a pole, a snowboard cross athlete gets a mustache? Award: I give Alpine Skiing “7/10 Might See Again” due to my need to know what these flags are all about. Ice Dancing: At first, this event gave me the same creepy vibes I get from watching child beauty pageants. But as the performances went on, I slowly found myself becoming more involved with the sport. It went from a silly thing to watch to a serious battle of the blade. I tensed up each time a couple performed their Twizzles — an ice dance move that requires the couple to twist on the ice in synch. At some point, the announcer mentioned dramati- cally that “the blade never lies” in Ice Dancing. No, melo- dramatic announcer, no it does not. Award: 10/10, no explanation required. Twizzle on, ice dancers, Twizzle on. Perhaps you learned something from this article; per- haps you left with less knowledge than you had before. Regardless, it can be assumed that any understanding of these sports that you held before will be gone by the time the next Winter Olympics come around. NEED A LITTLE BLACK & BLUE? Dashing through the snow: NEEDALITTLEBLACK&BLUE? The Taylor Swift takeover and how to “Shake it Off” - - - - - - - - - Along with uncontrollable cannot control the urge to - - - - - - to the bench behind that - - - - - -
  35. 35. 2014 ELECTION/POLITICAL COVERAGE Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Johnsonian Winthrop University Staff
  36. 36. 2014 ELECTION/POLITICAL COVERAGE Open Division SECOND PLACE: CisternYard News College of Charleston Staff
  37. 37. 2014 ELECTION/POLITICAL COVERAGE Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Daily Gamecock University of South Carolina Staff Staffpresentedextensiveandbalancedreportingregarding candidaciesandproposedlegislationduringthegeneral electionyear.Whileprovidingcrediblesourcesandprofessional style,thenewspaperwasalsoabletopresentunique perspectivesfromitsreadership--thestudentbodyandfaculty.
  38. 38. SPECIAL SECTION OR EDITION Under 5,000 Division HONORABLE MENTION: Pacer Times USC Aiken Staff 4 |September 16, 2014 Multicultural life I landed in the U.S. on Aug. 6, 2014, as a Fulbright-Nehru Doctoral Research Fellow, 2014-15. It was my first international flight. It was my dream flight, and I did my family proud. My family lives in Kolkata, the capi- tal of British India and now the capital city of the state of West Bengal, which is located at the eastern side of India. Kolkata is also known as the city of joy, as well as the city of palaces. The Kolka- tans are crazy about soccer and cricket. My home university is Jadavpur Univer- sity, Kolkata. Every year, my university hosts a good number of international students. So I have always got exposure to various cultures and had the chance to meet and work with many people from different parts of the world. Before I came here, I was warned about the “culture shock.” Honestly speaking, I did not experience much of it, which was quite obvious. Still there are certain in- cidents worth mentioning. As soon as I landed in the U.S., I believe I have caused a little shock for the people I met here. For the past month, every newly-met person seemed to be so amazed by the fact that I can speak English, and every time, I told them proudly that Indians on average are trilingual. Also, my total journey time was a Greetings from India: My journey to USA reason for shock. It was more than 31 hours, and the shock was that I was not looking tired. That may be because I was just too excited to be tired. Many even thought that I am from Hawaii. I found that innocently funny and sweet. Maybe it was name, my basic iden- tity, which added to my national identity crisis. I must admit that the phone busi- ness here gave me some real complexes on the very first day. It seemed that I was able to involve almost everyone around into it. This was my first shock because it was a very easy thing in India. So my expectations were the same but unfortunately they turned out to be the other way around. On my way to the University Hous- ing from the airport the first thing I uttered, “There is no traffic at all! There are no cars on the roads!” In India, traf- fic is just crazy. The lack of hardly any public transportation made me little up- set. The meaning of it was my complete dependence on somebody else. My stay here is a short period so buying a car here is not worthwhile. In the end, all my problems were solved here by the amazing people who surround me and have provided me with the sense of immense security in a complete foreign land. I consider myself as one of the luckiest. I am here to share my piece of culture as well as to grab some from my host. In this journey I need friends, let me start with you. What say buddy! Mukulika Dattagupta Contributing Writer Pacer brings home national pageant title T.J. Wright Arts & Entertainment Editor ... Every newly-met person seemed to be so amazed by the fact that I can speak English ...” Submitted by Dhaval Panchal While most students were making preparations for fall semester, computer science and fine arts major, Dhaval Panchal was being named Mr. India America East Coast. Mr. India America is an annual pageant hosted by Spirit of India and Indian media and entertainment company, Star India. The pageant names a Mr. and Miss India America, along with a victor for each coast and a people’s choice award. Panchal was awarded both the Star India people’s choice award and the title of Mr. India America East Coast. “My heart was racing, I was drenching in sweat, and all I could possibly think of were the people who always have supported me throughout my journey,” Panchal recalled waiting on-stage for the results. “When the host finally spoke my name out of her mouth and declared me the winner of Mr. India America East Coast and Star TV, I had forgotten how to speak any languages.” After the pageant, Panchal walked the red carpet, met celebrities and made new connections toward his career. “I always wondered how the people I saw on TV became famous and what I could do to be like them. The answer is to work hard and never give up,” said Panchal. Panchal credits his success to his hard work and the unwavering support of his family. But Panchal isn’t just into pageants. He’s a professional model, actor, DJ and dancer. Now, beginning his junior year, Panchal aims his sights at keeping his grades up and resuming his pursuits in acting, modeling and pageants at the end of the semester. My heart was racing, I was drenching in sweat, and all I could possibly think of were the people who always have supported me throughout my journey,” Panchal accepts the Star TV People’s Choice Award and the title of Mr. India America East Coast. The Minority Achievement Program (MAP) is a peer mentor program that pairs incoming minority freshmen and transfers with upperclassmen mentors. Meetings are held every other Wednesday at 6 p.m. in Penland 106. | 5September 16, 2014on campus “Food, to a large extent, is what holds a society together, and eating is closely linked to deep spiritual experi- ences,” -Peter Farb and George Armela- gos, Consuming Passions: The Anthro- pology of Eating). No other sentence better sum ups what I think about food in general. As a French, I quickly noticed huge differences between the French and the American way of eating. This column may appear to you as a caricature full of stereotypes, but this is what I see with my foreigner’s eyes. You all know that food is something we really care about in France. Our chefs try to cook sophisticated dishes. Not surprisingly, the word “gourmet” comes from the French language. Also, French tend to prefer quality before quantity, which is quite the opposite here in America. This is why I was quite amazed when I saw that in every fast food restaurant, you could refill your drink. This is something we should export to France! In the meantime, food is fat and fruits and vegetables seem to be rarely consumed. Maybe we can say that French food tries to emphasize the taste and health aspect of the food. But as my philosophy teacher said, “Fat is life,” and I love life. Yet, these differences are not only on the food by itself, but also on the way Americans share meals. Here, meals are just made to eat. This is logical, you would answer. Yes, but a meal in France is also an excuse to be together and to talk during a long time. Thus, a French meal would last twice as long as an American meal. On the contrary, here, everything must go fast. Consequently, you eat fast, you buy takeout food and you can eat at any given moment. To me, this illustrates the American society, which seeks to go straight to the point. Finally, if I had to define Ameri- can food, I would say that this is the kingdom of fat and fast food. Although I prefer French food, I really enjoy the variety of food we can find here. Your food symbolizes the richness of the U.S. immigration history: Bagels come from the Jews, burgers and hot dogs from the Germans, french fries from the Belgians, pizza from the Italians, etc. However, this is now what we can call the “cuisine of the U.S.” I will simply finish with these words: “Bon appétit!” Nigerian student is adjusting to life in America Benoît Decaux Contributing Writer Joining the Pacer family this year is Moyosoretioluwafunmi Onifade, a freshman mechanical engineering major from Lagos, Nigeria. Lagos is the most populous city in Nigeria and the fastest- growing city in Africa. When he was younger, Onifade gave himself the name Kevin on his interna- tional passport due to the complexity of his birth name. “Kevin is a name I gave myself after watching Home Alone many times,” said the international student. “I just liked the name so I decided to take it with me.” Two weeks before school started, Oni- fade traveled to America and stayed in Maryland with his aunt, who lives there. “I wanted to come to America because it is the most developed country in the world, and I wanted to come here and get an educa- tion,” Onifade said. Imagine traveling over 6,599 miles away from your home, alone, to go to school. What would you do in this new place during your free time? Onifade’s favorite place on campus is the SAC. He has found the SAC to be a wonder- ful place to make friends and express his competitive nature; he plays a lot of pingpong. If you know him at all, then he has probably beaten you on the table at least once. Onifade said that he has made multiple friends at the school just by hanging out by the pingpong tables and waiting for an opponent. While in Nigeria, Onifade played soccer in his free time. He has yet to find time to play soccer here on cam- pus, but he plans to very soon. In addition to pingpong, Onifade has discovered that he loves American food. “Nigerian food is very delicious, but nothing beats fried American food.” His favorite food is a hot dog, and he enjoys most everything the SAC Cafeteria has to offer. Most Nigerian food, he said, is boiled has many differ- ent cultures that their food represents. Having been here al- most a month, Onifade has decided he would like to move here per- manently when he is older and become a mechanical engineer. He also dreams to possibly do something in music. He plays many instruments, including the keyboard. The biggest cultural difference that Onifade faces is the language. In Nigeria, he spoke Yoruba. He learned English before coming to America, but all the different accents and slang on campus is hard for him to grasp at times. Being so far from his parents can be hard, but he knows they are proud of him for going to college and making the travel to America alone. Kevin Onifade, a Nigerian native, is adapting to all the new aspects of American culture. French frog talks American food Lauren Carver Contributing Writer One may be surprised that the small campus of USC Aiken could form its own United Nations. In fact, there are over 100 interna- tional students from 25 different coun- tries. Each year, these students enroll via sports recruitment, foreign governmen- tal agencies or simply word-of-mouth. Though the University has such a large group of multicultural students, Lauren Eldridge fully enjoys her new position as assistant director of Global Studies and Multicultural Engagement. “I love the energy the students pos- sess and have had nothing but a positive experience thus far,” said Eldridge. Eldridge helps oversee intercultural programs like COMPASS, AASA and MAP. These programs focus mainly on minority students. GLOBE, a program specifically for international students, is currently in the revamping stages. There is also a Global Buddy program that pairs an international student with a domestic student. Andy Kabasele, the new director of Global Studies and Multicultural Engagement, has high goals set for this program. “I would love to have more domestic students study abroad,” he said. He also hopes to gain more interna- tional admissions from places such as Japan, Brazil and Chile. His personal goal is to increase international admis- sions by 20 percent. So far, Kabasele and Eldridge have had an orientation specifically for inter- national students, an ice cream social and an ICE event featuring Indian cul- ture. They will hold more cultural ICE events throughout the semester. Kabasele finds it easy to relate to international students. He was born in Congo and raised in France. The largest group of USCA inter- national students are from Angolia. In November, the University’s Inter- national Week will celebrate Angolia’s independence. “I wish to make USCA feel like home to all international students,” said Kabasele. Collegiate melting pot DeErica Reddish Staff Writer Lauren Carver Spain Nigeria Swedan Saudi ArabiaAngolaFrance
  39. 39. SPECIAL SECTION OR EDITION Under 5,000 Division THIRD PLACE: The Roddey McMillan Record Winthrop University Staff Summer brings major changes to Winthrop From the termination of former President Jamie Comstock Williamson than the one they left last spring. After being inaugurated on March 28, investigations done by reporters at the Herald uncovered that Williamson violated state ethic laws by hiring her hus- The Winthrop Board of Trustees decided to terminate her contract for violat- ing South Carolina ethics laws, providing misleading information to the board and after receiving information on her “explosive behavior” toward employees, according to Williamson’s termination letter from Kathy Bigham and the board. Williamson’s attorney, Bev Carroll, former president of the South Carolina Bar Foundation and Winthrop University graduate, responded with a letter stating Williamson’s intent to pursue further action regarding the manner in which she “The method in which this matter was handled was designed to deprive Dr. Williamson of an opportunity to address any and all concerns of the Board of Trustees might have for reasons I will outline hereinbelow,” Carroll said in her letter to the board. Several professors have declined to comment on the matter, including Dr. Jack DeRochi, dean of graduate school, and Dr. Gloria Jones, dean of University College. Dr. Debra Boyd was named temporary president until an interim president can be decided on while the search for a new president begins. By Ariel Gilreath Editor-in-chief RODDEY MCMILLAN RECORD August 21, 2014 See Summer pg. 3 August 2014 2 News This August, Winthrop Universi- ty will begin a program devoted to assisting diverse males from under- privileged backgrounds in the teaching Call Me MISTER will provide tuition assistance with loan forgiveness, help with job placement as well as give stu- dents a buddy system and an academic Students will live together in resi- dence halls and meet throughout the year with other misters, as well as take similar academic classes together for The goal of Call Me MISTER is to gather more teachers from diverse backgrounds to work in the public school system with a focus on disad- targets individuals from deprived The program was initially started at Clemson University and has since spread to 18 other South Carolina University Jackie Brockington said, “The overarching goal of the program is to recruit, retain, graduate and place - tion, as this population is currently lacking in the aspects of college, educa- tion program and community, both In order to be accepted into the program, students must be enrolled in either early childhood, elementa- ry education, middle level or special FAFSA, complete the program appli- cation, submit two letters of recom- mendation along with two essays and a signed statement from a counselor or - Call Me MISTER attracts male educators By Ariel Gilreath Editor-in-chief take a walk down Scholars Walk near Kinard Hall you may just bump into a new special someone added into the Win- Coordinator Meredith Carter gave further incite to the new statue on campus, giving answers to some of the questions According to Carter, the purpose of the statue is to, “Illus- Carter also mentioned that, “the idea of the statue was proposed by Jan Watson and other members of the class Carter stated, “Metamorphosis means change, which is This statue that sits on Scholars Walk is more than just Statue on Scholars Walk commemorates class of ‘64 By Kiara Smith Managing editor The newly instated Metamorohasis statue on Scholar’s Walk sculpted by Gregory Johnson symbolizes the spirit of the Winthrop graduated class of 1964. Photos by Ariel Gilreath and Kiara Smith. Index News Statue on Scholars Call Me MISTER Lost Winthrop Traditions Major Changes Culture From Generation to Generation Being a Music Major Studying Abroad Opinion College Shapes You Advice to Incoming Freshmen Kouture: International Students The Williamson Lesson About the RMR August 2014 3 News Summer changes Along with Williamson’s termination and Boyd’s tempo- rary installment were changes in tuition and credit hours needed by students to graduate. Tuition was increased by 2.84 percent, according to a letter sent out by former Council of Student Leaders President Chris Aubrie, who stated in the letter that he Finally, Winthrop has begun to change their hour requirements as a whole from 124 to 120 for students to degree programs are not required to make the change. Records and Registration. From Front The president’s house on Winthrop’s campus where former President Williamson stayed during her presidency. Photo by Ariel Gilreath. If there’s one thing Winthrop Eagles can agree on, it’s that Winthrop is a school of change and growth. From a one-room all girl’s institution to a fully has come far since its founding, but we its identity. As Winthrop made new additions, some traditions were lost or watered - - minds students of what Winthrop used to be. Here are some descriptions of old Winthrop traditions. Classes Night was an annual com- petition between freshmen, sopho- mores, juniors and seniors. Each class, mascots, blankets and colors (another old tradition), would perform their judged based on originality. The skits were well-kept secrets until the night of their performance. This tradition ended in 1974 when Winthrop became From 1929 to 1971, students, faculty, - ered for Winthrop’s May Day celebra- May prior to graduation and included music, dancing and a May Court pag- eant. The pageant included 18 contes- class. From the 1940s to 1960s, students gathered at the Tillman Hall Fountain in the spring for the dunking of the newly elected student body president by the outgoing student body presi- dent. - Fair. organizations would spread their booths across campus and engage stu- and telling them why they should join their organization. - recently lost traditions. Wednesdays at the Walk, which used to be Wednes- days at the Wall (the Winthrop Uni- students were welcomed with refresh- ments and music. This tradition ended in 2007. by the Student Alumni council. The campus community was encouraged Student alumni council members awarded prizes for wearing school colors and issued citations for clothes less than half of Winthrop’s forgotten traditions. The school has many more - neous ones, and this generation will top 25 best colleges in the South rankings, but students and faculty school label. Brought back traditions may increase the likelihood of students staying on campus rather than going home on the weekends. Lost Winthrop traditions Winthrop’s oldest rituals fade over time as new generations rise By Tiana McGee Staff writer August 2014 Culture There is so much to do on campus this year, especially for the incoming class of 2018. There is ALWAYS something going on. Even the smallest activity can lead to a great experience. things around campus: Go to DSU events. programs for the community to enjoy right on our campus. DSU is made up entirely of current Winthrop stu- is listed as top priority. This includes the lineup for - ry, musical and art performances and many other special acts. in the student announcements sent out Monday through Friday. Go to DiGs. Many students go to the DiGiorgio Center in their heart of Winthrop’s campus, the center has video Markley’s food court and enjoy each other’s compa- - Go to Dinas Place. Dina’s Place, Winthrop’s movie theater, is located most current movies on Wednesday and Saturday evenings. Go to programs and meetings. organizations on campus that put on programs for students to come out to. that are emailed out daily. Pick one or many and go out and support your stu- dent activities. Most meetings are open to students Getting involved in other organizations is a sure Go to the West Center. upstairs track and cardio equipment. There is also a Students may come in and check out equipment to Go to Scholars Walk. Go to Johnson Hall or Carroll Hall. - roll Hall stages a lot of these productions throughout the year. and perform selections for the community usually free or at a small cost to students. Once the year Go to Winthrop Lake or the Coliseum. For athletic supporters, the coliseum is a likely All games are completely free to students and a small student athletes. When it’s not game time, the lake and coliseum area is just the place to go on a sunny day to get - ever else comes to mind. If the physical campus still is not meeting your needs and you are looking for something more, - Stuff to do around WU By Kendra Wicker Opinion editor From left to right: The DiGiorgio Campus Center, Tillman Hall and Byrnes Auditorium. Photos by Ariel Gilreath. 4
  40. 40. SPECIAL SECTION OR EDITION Under 5,000 Division SECOND PLACE: The Roddey McMillan Record Winthrop University Staff September 2014 News 2 For years now, The Roddey-Mc- Millan Record has been a symbol of change for Winthrop University. When Winthrop’s student body became more diverse, The RMR was created to make sure black people had a voice and pres- ence on campus. However, the paper’s transition to multicultural content instead of primarily African-American concerns its founders. In 1986, a group of African-American students got together to discuss their needs on campus. They felt excluded from many areas on campus, not just The Johnsonian. David Belton, an - veys to African-American students to decide what would help their situation on campus. The result was a monthly paper that would focus on issues that concerned them. A student, Gail Harris, founded The African-American students to graduate from Winthrop, Cynthia Roddey and - can-American board of trustee mem- ber. Roddey will be attending and hon- ored this October during Winthrop’s 50th year of integration celebration. The paper focused solely on topics that concerned African-American stu- dents until 1993-1995, when student Alvin McEwen became editor. Since the word “minority” was used in the charter, McEwen was able to change the focus of the paper. When the paper was charted, minori- ty was just another word for blacks, but by 1993, minorities meant all kinds of races besides white. Much controversy came out of this change. Student Regina Butler and Kenya Cureton lead a protest in 1993 objecting to the paper’s change. A 1995 issue of The RMR reports that Roddey had a few problems with the change. “It did not tend to highlight black students’ achievements on campus.” Roddey said. Roddey also felt the paper relied too much on wire service stories, and cre- ative things, such as poetry, were cut out. According to the same issue, Mc- Millan said she did not see too many articles on black students. “I thought the changes were a detriment to the original intent the paper was designed for,” McMillan said. The controversy continued until the end of McEwen’s term as editor. “I was elated when I heard the paper was going to change,” McMillan said about the refocusing of its content. She believes black people should have been writing for and reading the paper all along. “When you allow someone else to destructive or it could be controlled, but when it’s uncontrolled anything can happen and that is what occurred,” McMillan said. In the spring of 2013, the founders of The RMR visited Winthrop to meet the paper’s current writers and editors. Students in the meeting said the founders liked the paper, but once again felt that it lacked African-Ameri- can content. This time, however, the paper’s multicultural content did not lead to controversy among students. Past ed- itor, Shaneequa Evans, feels the paper is still serving its purpose. “The RMR promotes cultural aware- ness and fosters diversity. We cover the issues that minorities face on an everyday basis that might not get cov- erage in The Johnsonian. We provide a voice for the voiceless,” Evans said. RMR founders speak on the progression of the paper By Tiana McGee News editor Tiana McGee mcgeet3@winthrop.edu Index News ...................................... pgs. 2-4 Anniversary of integration events RMR Founders Winthrop’s first black employees Sickle cell awareness month October anniversary event calendar Culture .................................. pgs. 5-8 50 years of integration International students integrated on campus Perks of being a mass comunication major International soccer player Opinion ............................... pgs. 9-11 Diversity matters Integration in a positive direction HBCU vs. PWI Advice to freshmen Style across the seas Winthrop is celebrating an exciting year in the universi- ty’s history, a year when college campuses nationwide were mostly monochrome and unwelcoming to diverse students. The campus is commemorating the 50-year mark when Cynthia Roddey, Delores Hurt, Arnetta Mackey and Sue Meriwether-Steed changed history in 1964 when they at- tended a then all-white female Winthrop College. The events are being hosted by the 50th Anniversary Coor- dinating Committee, which consists of multiple departments The week of events dedicated to the anniversary of inte- - ognize, acknowledge and celebrate those in our Winthrop history,” said Director of Diversity and Student Engagement Kinyata Brown. The calendar of events scheduled for the week can be found on page four. For more information on Winthrop’s integrations histo- ry and everyone involved with the anniversary, visit www. winthrop.edu/integration. All pictures on the cover are courtesy of the Louise Pettus Archives and the Winthrop University Tatler yearbook. Winthrop anniversary of integration events begin October By Ariel Gilreath Editor-in-chief Kinyata Brown. Photo courtesy of Ariel Gilreath. September 2014 News 3 During Winthrop University’s celebration of their 50th year of integration, Dorothy Barber and Ellen Owens will participate in a panel discussion on Oct. 9 to share their opinions about the integration at Winthrop. Barber is still appreciative of their positions in the “I was grateful. I don't think we knew that we were pany referred her to interview with Winthrop, and “It was really interesting to see how people reacted When asked about how students value integration expressed that she doesn't believe students value it “Students like Dr. Roddey paved the way for other Roddey will also participate in the panel discus wether Steed and others that helped pave the way toward the diversity at Winthrop. enrolled. “Integration has showed the potential of blacks. It to be recognized by others for her services. “I love Winthrop’s first black employees reflect on their integration experience By Nickolette Miller Special to the RMR Tiana McGee mcgeet3@winthrop.edu Delores Johnson in the 1967 French Club. Photo courte- sy of the Louise Pettus Archives. Delores Johnson in 1967 Junior Marshalls. Photo courte- sy of the Louise Pettus Archives. students to attend Winthrop and Sue Frances Meriweth Photos cour- tesy of the Louise Pettus Archives. Students like Dr. Roddey paved the way for other black students, but some students take it for granted. Dorothy Barber “” September 2014 News 4 Imagine being in fourth grade and - - - - - - - made in that - - - - - - Sickle cell awareness month By Ciapha Dennis Staff writer Tiana McGee mcgeet3@winthrop.edu Special50thAnniversaryofIntegration October Events Historical Exhibit and Kickoff Reception 4–6 p.m. Louise Pettus Archives & Special Collections, 700 Cherry Road Sponsored by the Office of the President, Friends of Dacus Library, and the 50th Anniversary Coordinating Committee Lunch & Learn: Contemporary Questions about Desegregation and Resegregation 11 a.m.-Noon Tuttle Dining Room Attendees should bring their own lunch, beverages and desserts will be provided Sponsored by the John C.West Forum on Politics and Policy Question Bridge: Black Males Blueprint Roundtable 7 p.m. Dina’s Place In conjunction with the exhibition Question Bridge: Black Males, a“Blueprint Roundtable”will be held to facilitate multi-generational dialogue about leadership, mentorship, and critical social issues in the black community. Sponsored by the John C.West Forum on Politics and Policy Minor in African-American Studies, DiGiorgio Student Union, Office of Diversity and Student Engagement,Winthrop University Galleries Traveling Exhibit of Integration Memorabilia 11a.m.-1p.m. DiGiorgio Lobby Sponsored by the Louise Pettus Archives & Special Collections Movie Showings Highlighting the Civil Rights Era Times and LocationsVary DiGiorgio Lobby Sponsored by the Resident Students’Association Lunch & Learn: Speak of theTimes: A Conversation withWinthrop’s Firsts 11 a.m.-Noon Tuttle Dining Room Panel discussion featuring Cynthia Plair Roddey ’67 and Delores Johnson Hurt ’68, plus Ellen Owens and Dorothy Barber, the first African-American library staff at Winthrop, hired in 1970. Attendees should bring their own lunch; beverages and desserts will be provided. Moderated by Nathaniel Frederick of the mass communication faculty. Sponsored by the Office of the President and the 50th Anniversary Coordinating Committee Black/NPHC Greek Alumni Celebration (invitation only; reservation required) 9 p.m.-1 a.m. McBryde Hall Sponsored by theWinthrop Alumni Association Monday 6th Tuesday 7th Wednesday 8th Thursday 9th Friday 10th Fulfilling the Promise Banquet and Recognition 6:30 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. banquet Richardson Ballroom $30 per person $50 per couple For tickets, call the Office of Development at 803/323-2150. Sponsored by the Office of the President and the Division of Institutional Advancement Saturday 11th Association of Ebonites Reunion Concert and Reception 3 p.m. Tillman Auditorium Winthrop’s oldest African-American student group, founded in 1968, will hold a reunion concert of current and former members, followed by a reception. Sponsored by the Office of the President and the 50th Anniversary Coordinating Committee Sunday 12th Aiden Brown (left) and Caleb brown (right). Photos courtesy of Ciapha Dennis. Graphic by Tara Phillips. (Left-right) Caleb Brown, Aalayah Williams and Aiden Brown.

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