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2013 SCPA Daily Newspaper Awards Winners

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See the winning photos, stories, designs and online entries from SCPA's 2014 Annual Meeting. Here are the Daily Newspaper award winners from the 2013 S.C. Press Association News Contest.

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2013 SCPA Daily Newspaper Awards Winners

  1. 1. Welcome!
  2. 2. Bronze Sponsors MICHAEL S. SMITH AUTHOR
  3. 3. Lee Bandy Rusty Boggs William Bradford, Jr. Sara Bruner Barry Byers Andy Cole Corny Cornwell Mary Davis Wilbert T. Fields Jane Green Bob Chatham Harris Carl Kilgus Jane Lareau Vii Leinfelder Buddy McCarter Johnny McCracken John Lewis McDonald Steve Porter William Rickenbaker Bud Shealy Ruth Ragsdale Sitton Mac Thrower William Young Warren Ripley Remembering Those We’ve Lost... See Page 8 for full necrology
  4. 4. Enjoy Dinner!
  5. 5. There’s still time to enter the iPad Mini raf e! South Carolina Newspaper Network iPads donated by: $5 each or $20 for 5 tickets. Cash, credit & checks are accepted. Tickets will be sold until the awards presentation starts. See any SCPA staffer to support the Foundation! Winner will be drawn at the end of the presentation!
  6. 6. OnFeb.8,1968,threestudentswerekilledand28peoplewereinjuredintheeventthatcame tobeknownasthe‘OrangeburgMassacre.’Ayearlater,amonumentwaserectedhonoring thosewhodied.Whatfewknewwastherewasanerror... ETCHEDINTIMEMistakeinS.C.State monumentcontinues throughouttheyears By DIONNE GLEATON T&D Staff Writer What’sinaname? Well, to the family of the late Delano H. Middleton, a legacy. Middleton, a Wilkinson High School student, was among three young men who were killed on Feb. 8, 1968, in what is known as the “Orangeburg Massacre.” On that night, S.C. Highway Patrol troopers opened fire on a crowd of protestersfollow- ingthreenightsofescalating racialtensionovereffortsto desegregate the All-Star TriangleBowl. SouthCarolinaStateCol- lege sophomore Henry E. Smith and S.C. State fresh- man Samuel Hammond Jr. also died in the incident, and 28 other people were injured. The “Orangeburg Mas- sacre” is remembered each year with a ceremony. This past Feb. 8, a friend and classmateofMiddletonno- ticedsomething. Sam Haynes said while Middleton was affection- ately known as “Bump” by family and friends, his middle initial has been in- correctly written as a “B.” Middleton’smid- dle name was Herman. The incor- rect initial was printed on a sign that the uni- versity erected in honor of the threeslainduring theincident,and engraved into a marker placed on the campus in their honor in 1969. The mistake has also fil- tered its way into coverage of the event, including ma- terials distributed by the university and news stories inTheTimesandDemocrat andotherpublications. “Havingthecorrectname printed means everything. I’m sure if ‘Bump’ was here anditwasoneofhisfriends, hewouldadvocatethatitbe done the right way. That’s thekindofpersonheexem- Each year, members of the university family and Orangeburg community gather around the monument to remember Feb. 8, 1968. The 1992 ceremony is pictured here. Delano Herman Middleton LARRY HARDY/T&D The three students who died in the event that has come to be known as the “Orangeburg Massacre” were honored with a monument on the South Carolina State University campus. The monument, which was installed in 1969, incorrectly states Delano H. Middleton’s name is “Delano B. Middleton.” See NAME, A7 CECIL J. WILLIAMS/SPECIAL TO THE T&D
  7. 7. Cloudy. High 67. Low 58. Complete 5-day forecast, B10 INSIDE Charleston, North Charleston, S.C. $2.00 THE SOUTH’S OLDEST DAILY NE WSPAPER FOUNDED 1803. POSTANDCOURIER.COM Doyouagreewith theAP’sGrammy predictions? Arts & Travel, E1 Parade:Meetthe ProductoftheYear contestwinners Inside GRACE BEAHM/STAFF All across Forgotten South Carolina, stores in once-thriving farm towns sit boarded up, such as this one in Bowman in Orangeburg County along U.S. Highway 178. Farming no longer needs the number of workers it once did, and factory or service jobs remain elusive for many in these rural parts of the state. 20counties 26counties ForgottenFo Modern Pickens Greenville Spartanburg Cherokee York ChesterUnion LaurensAnderson Oconee Newberry Saluda Edgefield McCorm ick Abbeville Greenwood Fairfield Kershaw Lancaster Marlboro Darlington Lee Sumter Richland Lexington Aiken Marion Dillon ClarendonCalhoun Williamsburg Chesterfield Florence Allendale Bamberg Orangeburg Berkeley Dorchester Georgetown Horry Charleston Colleton Ham pton Barnwell Jasper Beaufort The two South Carolinas BY DOUG PARDUE dpardue@postandcourier.com T ake interstate highways between South Carolina’s largest met- ropolitan areas and the scene remains similar — thick forests, meandering rivers and lush farms punctuated with thriving suburbs and vibrant downtowns. Get off those interstates and something else emerges — towns where poverty rules, illit- eracy passes to children like an inherited dis- ease, and diabetes strikes 9-year-olds because of bad diets and obesity. This is the other South Carolina. It runs along the “Interstate 95 Corridor” through the mostly majority black counties made infamous by the “Corridor of Shame” docu- mentary about inequities in public schools. It also includes the “Mill Crescent,” the swath of rural, largely white, old textile mill counties between the I-85 economic powerhouse and greater Columbia. If you took this other South Carolina away, the state would no longer rank at the bottom of nearly every list you want it to be at the top of. Instead, it would basically mirror the nation as a whole in income, education and health. Many crippling disparities linger in these metropolitan counties, but the areas have been pushed into the national mainstream by four decades of economic growth, deseg- regation and an influx of people from other states and countries with new ideas and high expectations. The other South Carolina remains shrouded in despair by the legacies of slavery, depen- dence on a marginally educated workforce, and political and economic domination by an elite few. Additional social, political and economic forces conspire with that three-part legacy to keep the region of some 1 million people, a fifth of the state population, locked in stagna- tion: The impact of generational poverty, the shift of political power from rural to urban areas, the decline of agricultural and textile- mill employment, and a lack of tax base to support schools and build infrastructure to attract business. Viewed on its own, the other South Carolina resembles many third-world nations. Forgotten South Carolina AL egacy of Shame A Blueprint for the Future SPECIAL REPORT | PART ONE OF A FOUR-PART SERIES More InsideA detailed map and charts comparing county statistics can be found on Page A13 Special online dataFor an interactive map with comparative data examining each county in South Carolina, go to postandcourier.com/forgotten-sc VideoTo watch a video about Forgotten South Carolina, go to postandcourier.com/forgotten-sc Inside today 10-page special section Pages A11-A20 Editorial: Remember forgotten counties. A8 SUNDAY, February 10, 2013 Piecingtogether thenewfaceof Carolinabaseball Sports, C1 CharlesTowneLanding: Halfofffamilyadmission withaudiotours,souvenirs See A2 Doyo theA predi Arts & the eYear ers Arts &Travel...................E1 Classifieds..................... H1 Dear Abby......................G6 Crossword ......................E5 Editorials........................A8 Faith &Values.................G1 Home & Garden..............D1 Horoscope......................G6 Local News.....................B1 Money............................F1 Movies ...........................E7 Obituaries ......................B4 Pets................................D5 Sports ............................C1 Television.......................E8 Wall St. Journal..............F2 INDEXSetting the record straight....................A2 N S
  8. 8. AFFILIATED OR NICHE WEBSITE Open Division THIRD PLACE: The State Dwayne Mclemore, Rick Millians, Josh Kendall, David Cloninger, Neil White and Tracy Glantz
  9. 9. AFFILIATED OR NICHE WEBSITE Open Division SECOND PLACE: Herald-Journal Sports Staff
  10. 10. AFFILIATED OR NICHE WEBSITE Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Staff
  11. 11. CARTOON Open Division THIRD PLACE: Herald-Journal Robert Ariail
  12. 12. CARTOON Open Division SECOND PLACE: Index-Journal Mike Beckom
  13. 13. CARTOON Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Greenville News Roger Harvell
  14. 14. ILLUSTRATION Open Division SECOND PLACE: Herald-Journal Gary Kyle Falling Sleepy?
  15. 15. INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Post and Courier Gill Guerry T T T S S Expo and packet pickup When: Thursday, April 4, from noon to 8 p.m. and Friday, April 5, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. There is no race-day packet pickup. Where: (New) Charleston Area Convention Center, 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston. Registration: Regularly priced ($45) entries are sold out, but organizers think $150 charity bibs will be available. Transportation to expo: Shuttles will run from the Charleston Visitor Center bus shelter on Ann Street between King and Meeting Streets every 15 minutes during the hours of expo. Kids Run & Wonderfest When: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, April 5; races start at 5 p.m. Where: Hampton Park, Charleston. Registration: $10 with a T-shirt, free without a T-shirt; noon- 8 p.m. Thurs- day, April 4, at Charleston Area Convention Center in North Charleston or noon-4:30 p.m. Friday, April 5, at Hampton Park. Parking: Brittlebank Park, Stoney Field and on the east side of Johnson Hagood Stadium at The Citadel. Shuttles will take participants to and from Hampton Park. Taste of the Bridge Run What: Sample dishes from about 25 local restaurants at one of three locations. When: 5-8 p.m. Friday, April 5. Where: Downtown Charleston (Maritime Center, 10 Wharfside St.); Mount Pleasant (Harborside East, 28 Bridgeside Drive); and North Charles- ton (Charleston Area Convention Center, 5001 Coliseum Drive). Overnight parking Discounted overnight parking for $5. When: 5 p.m. Friday, April 5, to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 6. Where: Charleston Visitor Center parking garage on Mary Street, between King and Meeting, S.C. Aquarium garage on Calhoun Street between East Bay and Concord streets, and Gaillard Auditorium garage on Alexander Street between Calhoun and George streets. Race day shuttle buses Runners and walkers must have official race bibs to gain access to free shuttle buses. Before the race: Runners can start boarding buses at 5 a.m. on Saturday, April 6, but must be in line before 6 a.m. For the first time ever, buses will depart from four different locations, including the major point: Calhoun Street at Anson Street. Other locations will be the Charleston Area Convention Center in North Charles- ton, Mount Pleasant Towne Centre and Daniel Island Park. Those parking in the aquarium garage can catch a limited number of buses from the alley north of the garage. After the race: Buses, clearly marked for return locations, will leave from Calhoun Street back to the original departure points. Boat shuttle A boat shuttle will take a limited number of participants from Fountain Walk (near S.C. Aquarium) to Patriots Point, then a bus to the race starting area. The boat shuttle, however, usually sells out. Road closures Coleman Boulevard in Mount Pleas- ant and the bike/ped lane on the Cooper River bridge close at 6:30 a.m. Saturday, April 6. The bridge closes, both ways, at 7 a.m. For a detailed list of road closures, including those for the Kids Run at Hampton Park on Friday, April 5, go to www.bridgerun.com/event.php 526 17 17 52 Charleston Expo and package pickup Charleston Area Convention Center, 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston. 1 CooperR. AshleyR. Springt. Springt. MeetingSt. St. ConcordSt. Houston Northcutt Blvd. Coleman Blvd. Shem Creek Drum Island KingSt. Kin g St. RutledgeAve. St. Sim m onsSt. McCants Dr. Line St. Cannon St. W oolfe Aquarium Parking Calhoun St. Marion Square Finish festival Maritime Center Taste of the Bridge Run Fountain Walk Boat shuttle Patriots Point Boat shuttle Harborside East Taste of the Bridge Run Hampton Park Kids Run & Wonderfest Mount Pleasant Charleston Cooper River TownCreek TownCreek Mile 3 Mile 4 Mile 5 Corral area (details below) Mile 6 Mile 2 Mile 1 The 2013 Cooper River Bridge Run starts 8 a.m. April 6. Use this page as a reference to know where to line up at the start, where to watch the race or how to get to the start. Read The Post and Courier and postandcourier.com/news/bridgerun/ all week to stay in the know on race updates, results, background, race tips and more. 36th Cooper River Bridge Run Sea Island Shopping Center Moultrie Middle School Moultrie Shopping Center Royall Hardware Brookgreen Town Center Hibben Church Coleman Blvd. Coleman Blvd. SimmonsSt. FairmontSt. VincentDr. CamelliaDr. PherigoSt. Ben Sawyer Blvd. ChuckDawleyBlv d. CooperRiverBridg e2miles Shuttle bus drop-off Who: Elite runners who range from invited athletes to the very best in local runners. Limited to 200 runners. Yellow Blue Orange Sub-corrals I- K Who: Runners who walk/walk run - approximately 3, 000 per corral. White Who: Runners competing for age group awards or who run under 45 minutes. Limited to 2,000 runners. Red Sub-corralsE-H Who: Runners who run over 1 hour - approximately 4,000 per corral. Green Sub-corrals A-D Who: Runners who run 45-60 minutes - approximately 4,000 per corral. Who: Runners expected to finish in under 40 minutes. Limited to 1,000 runners. SOURCE:COOPER RIVER BRIDGE RUN GILL GUERRY/STAFF = Portable toiletsT = Sweat shuttleS Marion Square Gaillard Auditorium (Under Construction) Johnnie Dodds Blvd.Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Corrals and the Wave Start Participants are assigned to color-coded corrals and number-coded sub-corrals.Yellow and blue corrals, which include elite and sub-40 minute runners, start at the 8 a.m. gun. Subsequent sub-corrals follow in "waves" at three-minute intervals.Total of 14 waves this year to further improve the flow of people along the course. Yellow and Blue start at the gun Each subsequent sub-corral will start at 3-minute intervals First aid stationFi Water stationWW ParkingPaPP P P P OOP W W W W Finish line Meeting St. near George St. Start line Coleman Blvd. near Simmons St. Start MeetingSt. Gaillard Auditorium Gaillard Auditorium Shuttle bus staging 5 a.m. race day Participants will line up on Calhoun and be directed to waiting buses near the Gaillard. One lane of Calhoun will remain open for emergency vehicles. Buses Calhoun Street shuttle bus staging Runners and walkers will start boarding buses at 5 a.m. Saturday, April 6. Of four departure locations, the largest will be Calhoun Street at Anson, where 130 buses are designated to transport about 12,000 participants to the starting line in Mount Pleasant. Participants can start lining up on Calhoun Street at 5 a.m. Saturday, April 6, but must be in line by 6 a.m. The last bus allowed to cross the Cooper River bridge will be at 6:45 a.m. Buses departing after that will have to use I-526 to get to Mount Pleasant. 1 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 5 5 5 14 COOPER RIVER BRIDGE RUN 2013 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT COOPER RIVER BRIDGE RUN 2013 15 Expwy. Expwy. GILL GUERRY/STAFF Reported areas of flooding- related traffic problems 26 Filled-in creeks + rain + high tide = flooding When the Charleston peninsula floods, as it did on Wednesday, it’s a reminder that much of the present-day downtown is built upon filled-in creeks and marsh. City officials say several major drainage projects will be finished by 2020. ERRY/STA Historic elevation details from a map created by A.O. Halsey in 1949. GILL GUGILL GU Historic elevation details from a map created by A.O. Halsey in 194 is built upon filled in creeks and marsh. City o Reported areas of flooding- related traffic bl major drainage projects will be finished by 2020.j g p F problems Fire on Front Street The early morning fire on Georgetown’s historic waterfront destroyed about one-half a block of businesses, apartments, shops and restaurants between Screven and Broad streets. Damages are estimated to be between $1 million and $6 million. The origin of the fire remains under investigation. Fire Front Street Harbor Walk 729 725 723 721 719 715 713 709711 Screven Street Clock Tower & Rice Museum S.C. Maritime Museum Broad Street Parking Lot City Park F T w b b e T DetailFront St. WinyahBay GEORGETOWN 17 17 SampitRi ver SampitRi ver SampitRiver GILL GUERRY/STAFF
  16. 16. INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO Open Division SECOND PLACE: The Post and Courier Chad Dunbar BY HANNA RASKIN || hraskin@postandcourier.com M uch of what grocery shoppers will miss about the Pig- gly Wiggly can’t be perfectly calculated. It’s nearly im- possible to quantify intangibles such as the security of knowing a manager really will make good on his offer to order a missing item, or the comfort that comes from always seeing the same smiling clerk at the register. But faithful customers mourn- ing the scaling back of the chain are also worried about where they’ll find specific foods and drinks. While many of the follow- ing items, old and new, aren’t exclusive to The Pig, the store’s fans firmly believe that buying them elsewhere just won’t feel right. Mrs. Mac’s fried chicken Created in 1967 by former cafeteria worker Nel McNaughton, this peppery, thick-crusted fried chicken has picked up fans from as far away as Oklahoma. The original recipe still hangs in the Meeting Street store’s kitchen. Pig Swig Piggly Wiggly’s private label pilsner and ale debuted in 2011 as the chain tried to capture a larger share of the craft beer market. Brewed by Thomas Creek, the beers have generally pleased online critics, with the ale scoring a respectable “OK” from Beer Advocate. Most importantly, it comes from the Pig. Grace Bridge wine Slightly less successful than its private label beer, budget-friendly Grace Bridge wines were rolled out in 2009 for $7.99 a bottle. They were intended as good-value sipping that offered “a bridge” between Lowcountry food and California wines. The Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay are made by Brownstone Winery in Lodi, Calif., and the labels display a vintage, sepia-toned photo of the John P. Grace Memorial Bridge, a predecessor of the Ravenel Bridge. D’Allesandro’s frozen pizza The city’s first frozen pizza line is sold at smaller gourmet markets around town, but The Pig was the only major retailer to take a chance on D’Allesandro’s hand-tossed, heat- and-eat pies. The St. Philip Street pie shop was opened in 2006 by Philadelphia natives and brothers Nick and Ben D’Allesandro. Signature Savoure Dip Piggly Wiggly’s spreadable cheese led off a list of “THE MAIN THINGS I’m worried about disappearing” submitted by reader Jean Louisa Steele, who’s been shopping at The Pig for 40 years. The recipe was developed at the Meeting Street Pig many years ago. Mac’s Pride peaches “TheMac’sPride peachesarethebest I’veevertasted,”reader KathyCooleywrites oftheMcLeodFarms product.“Ilovetheprice, too.Whentheygoon sale,Ibuylotsofthem andfreezethemforthe winter.”TheMcLeod familyhasbeengrowing peachessince1916on orchardssurrounding thesmalltownofMcBee, S.C.,andnowhave650 acresand22varieties. Hayes Star Brand field peas Ask any Charlestonian: hoppin’ John is made with rice and field peas, NOT black-eyed peas. Piggly Wiggly, ever attuned to local tastes, creates special displays or fills its aisle endcaps with them at holiday time. On a recent visit, a cashier told us she planned to stock up on the bagged field peas before the store closes. Blenheim Red Cap ginger ale South Carolina’s Blenheim makes a milder ale, but drinkers who make a point of buying their six- packs at The Pig swore by the original recipe’s sinus- cleansing sting. What else would you expect from a company that dates to 1903 and is located on the grounds of the famous I-95 pit stop, South of the Border. Fresh green peanuts Any old grocery can sell canned boiled peanuts, but home cooks who prefer to boil their own batches need the fresh green nuts that Piggly Wiggly makes a point of carrying. Mepkin mushrooms The attentiveness that’s a hallmark of the Trappist monastic tradition has led to the order acquiring a green-thumb reputation. Mepkin Abbey, located outside Moncks Corner, is the only U.S. monastery that has applied its growing skills to mushrooms, sold first by The Pig. Turkey necks, small chickens Southern food diva and Charleston resident Nathalie Dupree swears by the back shelf of the Meeting Street store’s meat case. She’s especially taken with the small chickens, sized right for frying, and the turkey necks, which can be served up with such Southern classics as lima beans, collards and gumbo. Mr. Bullwinkel’s Famous Whipped Cream Cake When George Bullwinkel closed his Charleston bakery in 1974, the Piggly Wiggly invited the 62-year-old to set up shop in its Meeting Street store. He brought with him a family recipe for three-layer cake made with whipped cream and raspberries. Around Christmas, the now-deceased baker would make more than 1,000 cakes. 12 favorites Pigfans squealabout What Piggly Wiggly shoppers will miss PHOTOGRAPH BY GRACE BEAHM/STAFF AND GRAPHIC BY CHAD DUNBAR/STAFF Which product will you miss most. Vote at postandcourier.com. Poll
  17. 17. INFORMATIONAL GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO Open Division FIRST PLACE: The State Meredith Sheffer C O L U M B I A ɀ S O U T H C A R O L I N A SUNDAY, JUNE 16, 2013 ɀ WWW.THESTATE.COM ɀ SECTION C SUNDAY SPORTS BASKETBALL: BIG NAMES FLOCK TO S.C. PRO-AM C4 BRYN RENNER 6-3/225, senior Record vs. USC: 0-0 AARONMURRAY 6-1/208, senior Record vs. USC: 0-3 AUSTYN CARTA-SAMUELS 6-1/220,senior Recordvs.USC: 0-0 BLAKE BORTLES 6-4/227,junior Recordvs.USC: 0-0 JALENWHITLOW6-2/208,soph. Recordvs.USC:0-0 BRANDON ALLEN 6-3/212,soph. Record vs.USC: 0-0 JUSTIN WORLEY 6-4/213,junior Recordvs.USC: 0-1 JAMES FRANKLIN 6-2/230,senior Recordvs.USC: 0-1 TYLER RUSSELL 6-4/220,senior Record vs.USC: 0-1 JEFF DRISKEL 6-4/237,junior Recordvs.USC: 1-0 ALEX ROSS6-1/200,soph.Recordvs.USC:0-0 TAJH BOYD 6-1/225, senior Record vs. USC: 0-3 A look at the signal-callers USC will play this fall. Only one has a win against the Gamecocks. INSIDE Statistics and analysis of each of these QBs, C3
  18. 18. INNOVATIVE CONCEPT Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Island Packet Mike McCombs Preseason Football special section
  19. 19. INNOVATIVE CONCEPT Open Division SECOND PLACE: The Times and Democrat Staff Not just a newspaper anymore
  20. 20. INNOVATIVE CONCEPT Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Staff eBooks
  21. 21. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING Open Division THIRD PLACE - TIE: Index-Journal Frank Bumb Saluda mayoral mileage reimbursements Mayor claims $26K in mileage Saluda’s top official says travel was for economic development FRANK ADDY By FRANK BUMB fbumb@indexjournal.com While the cost of gas, getting to and from work, school and family activities has risen for every American during the past few years, the mileage reimburse- ments for Saluda Mayor Frank Addy rose exponentially since 2010. According to documents obtained by the Index-Journal, the reimbursements for travel Addy received increased by 1,100 percent from 2010 to the end of 2012. In 2010 Addy received $2,347.30, $8,849.40 in 2011 and $26,621.76 in 2012. The mileage needed to receive such imburse- ments, paid from the town’s gen- eral fund, with a reimbursement rate of 55 cents per mile, would be 4,267.8 miles in 2010, 16,089.8 miles in 2011 and 48,403.2 miles in 2012. Addy said the reimbursements stemmed from trips seeking eco- nomic development opportuni- ties for Saluda. “We’ve made a sincere effort for economic development,” Addy said. “And it’s more than See MILEAGE, page 5A By FRANK BUMB fbumb@indexjournal.com SALUDA — Saluda Mayor Frank Addy insists mileage claimed by him from 2010 to 2012 is “above board” and done “for the best interests of the town.” But there is almost no docu- mentation supporting the legiti- macy of Addy’s claims. On Tuesday, the Index-Journal reviewed vouchers, check stubs and other information at Saluda Town Hall in response to a Free- dom of Information request sent Jan. 18. According to information obtained by the Index-Jour- nal through that request, Addy claimed more than 68,760 miles for reimbursement from Saluda’s general fund since 2010. That represents a total of $37,818.46 in reimbursements for mileage since 2010. Of that total, 48,403.2 miles for $26,621.76 reimburse- ment were claimed in 2012. Addy included documentation supporting his travels for only 60 miles out of the roughly 68,760 claimed since 2010. The documentation was a signed thank you card from a Hometown, South Carolina Regional Advocacy meeting. The meeting, according to the Documents shed little light FRANK ADDY Evidence exists for only 60 miles of Saluda mayor’s claimed mileage See LIGHT, page 3A Saluda passes mileage ruling Resolution does not require evidence of trips, only vote By FRANK BUMB fbumb@indexjournal.com SALUDA — In response to growing inquiry about the reimbursement of travel expenses to elected officials, Saluda Town Council voted unanimously Tuesday to adopt a resolution for a for- mal policy concerning future reim- bursements. “This sets some guide- l i n e s for reimburse- ments in the future,” Town Administrator Randy Cole said. “It says you have to get prior approval before a trip.” The town lacked any for- mal, written policy for the reimbursement for mileage by elected officials before the adoption of the resolution. The Index-Journal recently obtained documents that showed Mayor Frank Addy claimed reimbursements for more than 68,760 miles from Saluda’s general fund since 2010. That represents a total of $37,818.46 in reimburse- ments for mileage since 2010. Of that total, 48,403.2 miles for $26,621.76 reimbursement were claimed in 2012 alone. “I did what I needed to within policy, and I was try- ing to do what was best for the town,” Addy said previously. “But that’s why we’re going to have this resolution to sort everything out.” The total reimbursements claimed by the rest of Council, Cole and Town Clerk/Treasur- er Claudia Cochran amounted to $2,184.14 combined, from 2010 to 2012. Addy previously stated the determination to seek a for- mal reimbursement policy was because of Freedom of Information Act requests and increased scrutiny of the expenses incurred for the reimbursements. “But it was also because Council had asked for more clarification on how to go FRANK ADDY S SALUDA 3A Parties deny meeting Addy Saluda mayor claims reimbursement of 68,760 miles from 2010-12 FRANK ADDY By FRANK BUMB fbumb@indexjournal.com SALUDA — Mayor Frank Addy insists mileage reim- bursements he claimed from 2010-12 were proper and done for economic development purposes. However, none of the organi- zations contacted by the Index Journal have any record or rec- ollection of meeting with Addy on the days claimed on Addy’s expense vouchers. As previously reported, Addy claimed more than 68,760 miles for reimbursement from Saluda’s general fund since 2010. That represents a total of $37,818.46 in reimbursements, paid from the town’s general fund, for mileage since 2010. Of that total, 48,403.2 miles for $26,621.76 reimbursement were claimed in 2012 alone. Addy included documenta- tion supporting his travels for only 60 miles of the 68,760 he claimed since 2010. The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) launched a preliminary inquiry into the reimbursements received by Addy and the role other town officials played in the reim- bursements. Thom Berry, a spokesman for SLED, said Thursday there was no new information to be released. “At this time, the investiga- tion is still ongoing,” Berry said. “Other than that I don’t have anything I can give you.” According to documents obtained by the Index-Jour- nal, Addy’s claimed trips, often hundreds of miles during short time periods, were to a variety of businesses and organizations around South Carolina and surrounding states. S DENY 4A
  22. 22. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING Open Division THIRD PLACE - TIE: Index-Journal Scott J. Bryan and Chris Trainor GCSO expenditures By SCOTT J. BRYAN and CHRIS TRAINOR Index-Journal staff H undreds of thousands of Greenwood County Sheriff's Office dollars were spent on a trip to Disney World, restaurants, pag- eants and even Victoria's Secret, a compre- hensive look at GCSO's finances reveal. The Index-Journal reviewed nearly 750 pages of documents provided by the sheriff's office, through Greenwood County interim attorney Stephen Baggett Jr., in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. The sheriff's office finances are being investigated by the South Carolina Law Enforce- ment Division (SLED). SLED asked Baggett on April 12 to not release the documents, but Baggett complied with the FOIA and released all information not exempted. "The premature release of this information, that was compiled in the process of detecting and inves- tigating alleged crimes, could jeopardize our ongo- ing investigation," SLED executive assistant to the chief Kathryn Richardson wrote Baggett in an email. The Index-Journal review of debit expenditures and checks found a wealth of unusual transactions. GREENWOOD COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE DOCUMENTS REVEAL UNUSUAL PURCHASESGCSO spent money on Disney World, Victoria's Secret, pageants and more ComingFriday ■ The Greenwood County Sheriff's Office spent thousands of dollars in funds for food, including more than $26,000 with one out-of-town catering company. TONY DAVIS ■ Sandi McAlister- Owens, the former GCSO administrative assistant, was fired Feb. 4, according to a Greenwood County Personnel Action form included in the FOIA request. On the personnel form, dated Feb. 4 and signed by Greenwood County Sheriff Tony Davis, it says McAlister- Owens would not be rehired. In the explanation, Davis wrote, "investigation turned over to SLED." "The investigation is open and ongoing." — SLED spokesman Thom Berry, via a short email statement See UNUSUAL, page 7A
  23. 23. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING Open Division SECOND PLACE: The State Sammy Fretwell South Carolina’s effort to enforce environmental laws hasn’t stopped companies and government agencies from re- peatedly breaking rules to pro- tect the air, land and water dur- ing the past two decades. Nearly 25 percent of the 4,700 businesses and govern- ments cited for violating envi- ronmental laws since 1991 have done so multiple times, and in some cases, their fail- ures to follow the rules are continuing today, according to civil enforcement records ana- lyzed by The State newspaper. Repeat offenders in South Carolina include power com- panies, local wastewater utili- ties, military bases, private shipyards, national garbage corporations, major cement factories, farm companies and public universities, according to Department of Health and Environmental Control records. EXCLUSIVE | REPEAT OFFENDERS Environmental lawbreakers still at itFINDINGS ■ About 1,100 of 4,700 companies and governments cited for state envi- ronmental violations in the past 20 years have had more than one offense. ■ About 200 violators had five or more citations, including at least 14 that broke the law 15 times or more. ■ At least 120 of those with five or more violations have had violations during the past five years. ONLINE See a full listing of companies and governments with the most violations that continue to run into trouble, at thestate.com. INSIDE Offenders with more than 10 violations, A11 Nearly one-fourth of the 4,700 business and government offenders since 1991 are repeat offenders By SAMMY FRETWELL sfretwell@thestate.com SEE REPEATERS PAGE A10
  24. 24. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Doug Pardue Forgotten South Carolina Cloudy. High 67. Low 58. Complete 5-day forecast, B10 INSIDE Charleston, North Charleston, S.C. $2.00 THE SOUTH’S OLDEST DAILY NE WSPAPER FOUNDED 1803. POSTANDCOURIER.COM Doyouagreewith theAP’sGrammy predictions? Arts & Travel, E1 Parade:Meetthe ProductoftheYear contestwinners Inside GRACE BEAHM/STAFF All across Forgotten South Carolina, stores in once-thriving farm towns sit boarded up, such as this one in Bowman in Orangeburg County along U.S. Highway 178. Farming no longer needs the number of workers it once did, and factory or service jobs remain elusive for many in these rural parts of the state. 20counties 26counties ForgottenFo Modern Pickens Greenville Spartanburg Cherokee York ChesterUnion LaurensAnderson Oconee Newberry Saluda Edgefield McCorm ick Abbeville Greenwood Fairfield Kershaw Lancaster Marlboro Darlington Lee Sumter Richland Lexington Aiken Marion Dillon ClarendonCalhoun Williamsburg Chesterfield Florence Allendale Bamberg Orangeburg Berkeley Dorchester Georgetown Horry Charleston Colleton Hampton Barnwell Jasper Beaufort The two South Carolinas BY DOUG PARDUE dpardue@postandcourier.com T ake interstate highways between South Carolina’s largest met- ropolitan areas and the scene remains similar — thick forests, meandering rivers and lush farms punctuated with thriving suburbs and vibrant downtowns. Get off those interstates and something else emerges — towns where poverty rules, illit- eracy passes to children like an inherited dis- ease, and diabetes strikes 9-year-olds because of bad diets and obesity. This is the other South Carolina. It runs along the “Interstate 95 Corridor” through the mostly majority black counties made infamous by the “Corridor of Shame” docu- mentary about inequities in public schools. It also includes the “Mill Crescent,” the swath of rural, largely white, old textile mill counties between the I-85 economic powerhouse and greater Columbia. If you took this other South Carolina away, the state would no longer rank at the bottom of nearly every list you want it to be at the top of. Instead, it would basically mirror the nation as a whole in income, education and health. Many crippling disparities linger in these metropolitan counties, but the areas have been pushed into the national mainstream by four decades of economic growth, deseg- regation and an influx of people from other states and countries with new ideas and high expectations. The other South Carolina remains shrouded in despair by the legacies of slavery, depen- dence on a marginally educated workforce, and political and economic domination by an elite few. Additional social, political and economic forces conspire with that three-part legacy to keep the region of some 1 million people, a fifth of the state population, locked in stagna- tion: The impact of generational poverty, the shift of political power from rural to urban areas, the decline of agricultural and textile- mill employment, and a lack of tax base to support schools and build infrastructure to attract business. Viewed on its own, the other South Carolina resembles many third-world nations. Forgotten South Carolina A Legacy of Shame A Blueprint for the Future SPECIAL REPORT | PART ONE OF A FOUR-PART SERIES More InsideA detailed map and charts comparing county statistics can be found on Page A13 Special online dataFor an interactive map with comparative data examining each county in South Carolina, go to postandcourier.com/forgotten-sc VideoTo watch a video about Forgotten South Carolina, go to postandcourier.com/forgotten-sc Inside today 10-page special section Pages A11-A20 Editorial: Remember forgotten counties. A8 SUNDAY, February 10, 2013 Piecingtogether thenewfaceof Carolinabaseball Sports, C1 CharlesTowneLanding: Halfofffamilyadmission withaudiotours,souvenirs See A2 Doyo theA predi Arts & the eYear ers Arts &Travel...................E1 Classifieds..................... H1 Dear Abby......................G6 Crossword ......................E5 Editorials........................A8 Faith &Values.................G1 Home & Garden..............D1 Horoscope......................G6 Local News.....................B1 Money............................F1 Movies ...........................E7 Obituaries ......................B4 Pets................................D5 Sports ............................C1 Television.......................E8 Wall St. Journal..............F2 INDEXSetting the record straight....................A2 N S
  25. 25. MIXED MEDIA ILLUSTRATION Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Times and Democrat Kristin Coker
  26. 26. MIXED MEDIA ILLUSTRATION Open Division SECOND PLACE: The State Meredith Sheffer Hook, Line and Bubba J immy Koosa looks at the roughly five-foot gap between two cedar trees, and you can almost see the gleam of anticipation in his eye. The trees stand to the right of the Country Club of Lexington’s driving range, where on a chilly March morning, the long-time Irmo- and Lexington-based golf instructor is demonstrating the art of thehookshot—specifically,theleft-hand- ed hook. If you watched the end of the 2012 Mas- ters, you saw probably the most famous example of that little-appreciated skill. On the second hole of a sudden-death playoff with Louis Oosthuizen, Bubba Watson — he of the untamed hair, hot-pink driver It took the skill and the imagination of Bubba Watson to hit the incredible hook shot that won the 2012 Masters. By BOB GILLESPIE bgillespie@thestate.com SEE HOOK PAGE S3 MASTERS PREVIEW S4: Why the Honorary Starters are the best tradition at Augusta National. S5: Jack Nicklaus’ six Masters wins on the 50th anniversary of his first triumph S7: Famous golfers’ girlfriends to watch for during the Masters ONLINE Learn how to hit a hook from local golfer Jimmy Koosa at thestate.com. MORE SPORTS A1: Jackie Robinson’s impact on S.C. race relations C1: What’s the future of USC’s “Zone Read” running game? C1: Jordan Mosely, from Spring Valley, takes winding road to NFL C1: NCAA Final Four SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA WWW.THESTATE.COM • SECTION S
  27. 27. MIXED MEDIA ILLUSTRATION Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Luke Reasoner BY GENE SAPAKOFF || gsapakoff@postandcourier.com J anuary 6 is three months and tons of tailgate foodaway.Butthecollegefootballelimination process leading to the BCS National Cham- pionship Game at the Rose Bowl in Pasade- na, Calif., is about to get as serious as touchdown algebra, and Clemson has a front-row opportunity. A victory over Boston College on Saturday — the Tigers are 24-point favorites — sets up No. 3 Clemson vs. No. 6 Florida State on Oct. 19 at Death Valley in what projects as the highest combined ranking for any game played in South Carolina. Official BCS rankings come out the next day. The five keys to Clemson making it to the BCS Championship Game — against Alabama or Oregon. Or Stanford, Georgia or Ohio State are: Will it all line up? Five keys to Clemson punching a ticket to Pasadena Please see CLEMSON,Page C4
  28. 28. ONLINE COLUMN WRITING Open Division THIRD PLACE: Herald-Journal Eric Boynton
  29. 29. ONLINE COLUMN WRITING Open Division SECOND PLACE: Herald-Journal Eric Boynton
  30. 30. ONLINE COLUMN WRITING Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Gene Sapakoff
  31. 31. ONLINE NEWS PROJECT Open Division HONORABLE MENTION: The State Darren Price and Dwayne McLemore Clowney Interactive
  32. 32. ONLINE NEWS PROJECT Open Division THIRD PLACE: Index-Journal Matt Walsh and Chris Trainor The Pursuit of Heat
  33. 33. ONLINE NEWS PROJECT Open Division SECOND PLACE - TIE: The Post and Courier Tony Bartelme Salary Database
  34. 34. ONLINE NEWS PROJECT Open Division SECOND PLACE - TIE: The Post and Courier Gill Guerry Charleston Area Homicides
  35. 35. ONLINE NEWS PROJECT Open Division FIRST PLACE: The Greenville News William Fox, Lyn Riddle, Mykal McEldowney andMelissaHall Homeless in Greenville
  36. 36. SERIES OF SPORTS ARTICLES Open Division THIRD PLACE: The Post and Courier Gene Sapakoff Blacks in baseball
  37. 37. SERIES OF SPORTS ARTICLES Open Division SECOND PLACE: The State John Devlin Dozen Dynasties ORANGEBURG — Of all Bill Hamilton’s accomplishments as South Carolina State’s first and only sports information director — and over 40 years working at his alma mater, that covers a lot of territory — perhaps none is as astound- ing, or mind-numbing, as the landfill-like mayhem that is his desk. Enter Hamilton’s cozy of- fice in S.C. State’s Nix Hall, and the first impression is: When does the HAZMAT team arrive? A seeming ava- lanche of paper — media guides, press releases, news- papers — plus a few unex- pected finds (reading glasses, a ball cap, a small sports tro- phy, a Carolina Hurricanes hockey puck) creates a moundrisingaboutsixinches BILL HAMILTON | SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR S.C. STATE’S BIGGEST FAN Bill Hamilton, the sports information director at South Carolina State, is retiring after 40 years. Hamilton will be honored at a ‘Roast and Toast’ in Orangeburg on June 28. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KIM KIM FOSTER-TOBIN/KKFOSTER@THESTATE.COM By BOB GILLESPIE bgillespie@thestate.com SEE HAMILTON PAGE C7 C O L U M B I A ɀ S O U T H C A R O L I N A SUNDAY, JUNE 23, 2013 ɀ WWW.THESTATE.COM ɀ SECTION C SUNDAYSPORTS USC: SUMMERVILLE’S SMALLS COMMITS C3 BRAVES: BREWER COLLECTS 300TH SAVE C4 Phil Savitz has been on hand for parts of four decades of success as the boys soccer coach at Irmo. The veteran coach says the recent- ly completed 2013 season might be at the top of his personal highlights list. HisfinalYellowJacketssquadlimped through an unimpressive regular season, but put together a brilliant postseason run to claim the pro- gram’s 16th state championship. It was the 14th state title under Sa- vitz, who went 634-83-5 in 33 sea- sons, and puts the Irmo boys soccer program among The State’s Dozen Prep Dynasties in the Midlands. “We started the season with a young, inexperienced team, and I really had no idea what to expect,” Savitz said. “We lost our first three gameswithoutscoringagoalinapre- season tournament. We lost the last three games in the regular season. Blythewood and us took turns giving the region championship back before we finally won it. We were the first Irmo team to lose to Chapin and the first Irmo team to lose on Senior Night. “It’s safe to say that we never did establish an identity.” All that changed in the state play- offs. Perhaps it was motivation to send Savitz, who is leaving to launch the program at first-year River Bluff SAVING THE BEST FOR LAST IRMO TITLES Irmo boys soccer state championships: 1978 1979 1982 1987 1988 1989 1990 1993 1995 1996 1997 1998 2000 2003 2004 2013 COMING MONDAY The Lexington girls golf team. ONLINE Follow the Dozen Dynasties series with additional photos at thestate.com Coach Phil Savitz closes his career at Irmo with another title By JOHN DEVLIN Special to The State SEE IRMO PAGE C6 W E SHOULD not be sur- prised by the recent vandalism to Howard’s Rock, one of the more iconic sym- bols in college football. We live in an age where it is not enough to win games and capture championships. We must also taunt our opponents, chastise them publicly and, yes, damage and defame their history and traditions. Such is life in 2013 college athletics. We do not know who broke into Clemson’s Memorial Stadium and smashed the Plexiglas case before taking a chunk out of the rock in Vandalism is fandom for losers Ron Morris Columnist rmorris@ thestate.com SEE MORRIS PAGE C5
  38. 38. SINGLE ONLINE PHOTO Open Division THIRD PLACE: Independent Mail Ken Ruinard
  39. 39. SINGLE ONLINE PHOTO Open Division SECOND PLACE: Herald-Journal Tom Priddy
  40. 40. SINGLE ONLINE PHOTO Open Division FIRST PLACE: Independent Mail Ken Ruinard
  41. 41. SPORTS SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR SPORTS MAGAZINE Open Division THIRD PLACE: The State Staff 2013 COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE MARCUS LATTIMORE MARCUS LATTIMORE GREATEST GAMECOCK A SPECIAL ISSUE OF WITH A FOREWORD BY STEVE SPURRIER 21 COMMEMORATIVEISSUESUMMER2013
  42. 42. SPORTS SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR SPORTS MAGAZINE Open Division SECOND PLACE: The State Staff
  43. 43. SPORTS SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR SPORTS MAGAZINE Open Division FIRST PLACE: The State Staff
  44. 44. EDITORIAL/COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOIA All Daily Division THIRD PLACE: The Post and Courier Charles Rowe I n November, the Charleston County School Board found itself in violation of the state’s freedom of information law when six members turned up for a tour of the renovated campus of the former Rivers Middle School. School officials explained that they didn’t expect a majority of the board to attend, thereby triggering the FOIA require- mentfor publicnotificationofboardmeetings. Anaccident?That’showadistrictspokesman explained it. Butaniteminarecentdistrictnoticeemailed to school board members suggests that the practicemaybemorecommonthanimagined. Under the heading of “Small Group Meeting” it states: “AmeetingisscheduledattheTownofMount Pleasant at 9 a.m. on January 31st to discuss schoolfunding.Mr.[Michael]Bobbyisextend- inganinvitationtoMr.[John]Barterandthree other Board members to attend. ... Since no publicnoticewillbedoneforthismeeting,only fourboardmembersareallowedtoattend.An- other meeting will be scheduled if others are interested in this topic.” If five members were in attendance, it would constitute a quorum, requiring public notice to be given. Mr.Bobby,thedistrict’schieffinancialofficer, tells us that the meeting will give new board membersachancetohearaboutissuesrelatedto fundingschoolsinMountPleasant.Mr.Barter is among the recently elected board members. Town officials also are expected to attend. Mr. Bobby explained the reasoning behind having a meeting of board members that doesn’t trigger FOIA requirements: “We have to have the ability to do work,” he explained. “We’re not doing the public’s busi- ness. We’re doing training.” Tothecontrary.Whattheyarereallydoingis circumventing the law, which gives the public access to the public’s business. Schoolfundingdiscussionsthataredesigned toavoidtherequirementsofthestateFOIAwill erodeconfidenceinthewaythedistrictspends school money — or to put it another way, the public’s money. The board should stick to transparency as it discusses the public’s business. Meanwhile, if an unexpected trustee or two weretoshowupattheJan.31meeting,thedis- trict would again find itself in violation of the FOIA. That’s what happened at the November tour of the former Rivers Middle School cam- pus,whichisnowbeingsharedbytheCharles- ton Charter School for Math and Science and the new Lowcountry Tech Academy. Such a repetition of that blunder would di- minish confidence in the board and the dis- trict. Elected school board members shouldn’t countenancemeetingsthataremeanttoevade thepublic’seyebylimitingattendeestoanum- ber below a quorum. It violates the spirit of the law. No school secrets allowed EDITORIALS
  45. 45. EDITORIAL/COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOIA All Daily Division SECOND PLACE: Index-Journal Scott J. Bryan School board sings a disturbing tune From time to time, it might seem we overly espouse our belief in transparency in government and open records. In fact, it might seem a limitless, unabated chorus, with the newspaper singing the same song again and again, as if we were trapped in the closing credits of Lamb Chop's Play-Along. "This is the Freedom of Information Act that never ends. Yes, it goes on and on, my friends." After countless stories, columns and editorials stressing the importance of elected officials adhering to the law, it could be understood readers are exhausted by the constant reminders to public entities and their representatives — state leaders, council members and school board members — of how to best serve the public in an open manner. And perhaps there are some good, honest people who think there could simply be no way elected officials would violate the law, not after repeated press clippings reveal illegal behavior. We've got bad news for you. You've got a better chance of finding a leprechaun riding a unicorn in downtown Atlantis than you do of elected officials behaving transparently. Today's front-page story by Index-Journal education report- er Michelle Laxer testifies to the sad reality. No matter how fre- quently we lambaste public officials for indiscretions, the same behavior persists. This time, the McCormick school board is disregarding the law. Based on emails received from the McCormick County school district, the school board formed a consensus, via email or some place other than in public, to institute a hiring freeze and try to keep former superintendent Earlean Smiley in place during this past spring's budget process. First Amendment lawyer and South Carolina Press Associa- tion attorney Jay Bender said that violates the law. "It avoids public debate and the fact that it's been polled in advance means that action can be taken immediately without anybody really having an opportunity to weigh in on one side or the other," Bender told the Index-Journal. How do we know the McCormick board violated the law? The chairman of the board, Jim Lambeth, spelled it out in an email dated Jan. 14 to fellow board member Al Bell. ■ OUR VIEW
  46. 46. EDITORIAL/COLUMN IN SUPPORT OF FOIA All Daily Division FIRST PLACE: Herald-Journal Michael Smith Open up, county council
  47. 47. FEATURE SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR MAGAZINE All Daily Division THIRD PLACE: The Post and Courier Staff
  48. 48. FEATURE SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR MAGAZINE All Daily Division SECOND PLACE: Herald-Journal Staff
  49. 49. FEATURE SPECIALTY PUBLICATION OR MAGAZINE All Daily Division FIRST PLACE: Aiken Standard Staff Steeplechase March 23 Pacers & Polo March 30 Aiken Standard Aiken Trials March 16 aikenstandard.com
  50. 50. NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Daily Division THIRD PLACE: The Island Packet Staff
  51. 51. NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Daily Division SECOND PLACE: The Post and Courier Staff Cloudy. High 67. Low 58. Complete 5-day forecast, B10 INSIDE Charleston, North Charleston, S.C. $2.00 THE SOUTH’S OL DE ST DAILY NE WSPAP E R FOUNDE D 1 8 0 3. POSTANDCOURIER.COM Doyouagreewith theAP’sGrammy predictions? Arts & Travel, E1 Parade:Meetthe ProductoftheYear contestwinners Inside GRACE BEAHM/STAFF All across Forgotten South Carolina, stores in once-thriving farm towns sit boarded up, such as this one in Bowman in Orangeburg County along U.S. Highway 178. Farming no longer needs the number of workers it once did, and factory or service jobs remain elusive for many in these rural parts of the state. 20counties 26counties ForgottenFo Modern Pickens Greenville Spartanburg Cherokee York ChesterUnion LaurensAnderson Oconee Newberry Saluda Edgefield McCorm ick Abbeville Greenwood Fairfield Kershaw Lancaster Marlboro Darlington Lee Sumter Richland Lexington Aiken Marion Dillon ClarendonCalhoun Williamsburg Chesterfield Florence Allendale Bamberg Orangeburg Berkeley Dorchester Georgetown Horry Charleston Colleton Hampton Barnwell Jasper Beaufort The two South Carolinas BY DOUG PARDUE dpardue@postandcourier.com T ake interstate highways between South Carolina’s largest met- ropolitan areas and the scene remains similar — thick forests, meandering rivers and lush farms punctuated with thriving suburbs and vibrant downtowns. Get off those interstates and something else emerges — towns where poverty rules, illit- eracy passes to children like an inherited dis- ease, and diabetes strikes 9-year-olds because of bad diets and obesity. This is the other South Carolina. It runs along the “Interstate 95 Corridor” through the mostly majority black counties made infamous by the “Corridor of Shame” docu- mentary about inequities in public schools. It also includes the “Mill Crescent,” the swath of rural, largely white, old textile mill counties between the I-85 economic powerhouse and greater Columbia. If you took this other South Carolina away, the state would no longer rank at the bottom of nearly every list you want it to be at the top of. Instead, it would basically mirror the nation as a whole in income, education and health. Many crippling disparities linger in these metropolitan counties, but the areas have been pushed into the national mainstream by four decades of economic growth, deseg- regation and an influx of people from other states and countries with new ideas and high expectations. The other South Carolina remains shrouded in despair by the legacies of slavery, depen- dence on a marginally educated workforce, and political and economic domination by an elite few. Additional social, political and economic forces conspire with that three-part legacy to keep the region of some 1 million people, a fifth of the state population, locked in stagna- tion: The impact of generational poverty, the shift of political power from rural to urban areas, the decline of agricultural and textile- mill employment, and a lack of tax base to support schools and build infrastructure to attract business. Viewed on its own, the other South Carolina resembles many third-world nations. Forgotten South Carolina A Legacy of Shame A Blueprint for the Future SPECIAL REPORT | PART ONE OF A FOUR-PART SERIES More InsideA detailed map and charts comparing county statistics can be found on Page A13 Special online dataFor an interactive map with comparative data examining each county in South Carolina, go to postandcourier.com/forgotten-sc VideoTo watch a video about Forgotten South Carolina, go to postandcourier.com/forgotten-sc Inside today 10-page special section Pages A11-A20 Editorial: Remember forgotten counties. A8 SUNDAY, February 10, 2013 Piecingtogether thenewfaceof Carolinabaseball Sports, C1 CharlesTowneLanding: Halfofffamilyadmission withaudiotours,souvenirs See A2 Doyo theA predi Arts & the eYear ers Arts &Travel...................E1 Classifieds..................... H1 Dear Abby......................G6 Crossword ......................E5 Editorials........................A8 Faith &Values.................G1 Home & Garden..............D1 Horoscope......................G6 Local News.....................B1 Money............................F1 Movies ...........................E7 Obituaries ......................B4 Pets................................D5 Sports ............................C1 Television.......................E8 Wall St. Journal..............F2 INDEXSetting the record straight....................A2 N S
  52. 52. NEWS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Daily Division FIRST PLACE: The Herald Staff The Herald Wednesday ● July 31, 2013 Area students write about their favorite teachers CLASSBack-to-School Special Section
  53. 53. SPORTS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Daily Division THIRD PLACE: The State Staff J immy Koosa looks at the roughly five-foot gap between two cedar trees, and you can almost see the gleam of anticipation in his eye. The trees stand to the right of the Country Club of Lexington’s driving range, where on a chilly March morning, the long-time Irmo- and Lexington-based golf instructor is demonstrating the art of thehookshot—specifically,theleft-hand- ed hook. If you watched the end of the 2012 Mas- ters, you saw probably the most famous example of that little-appreciated skill. On the second hole of a sudden-death playoff with Louis Oosthuizen, Bubba Watson — he of the untamed hair, hot-pink driver It took the skill and the imagination of Bubba Watson to hit the incredible hook shot that won the 2012 Masters. By BOB GILLESPIE bgillespie@thestate.com SEE HOOK PAGE S3 MASTERS PREVIEW S4: Why the Honorary Starters are the best tradition at Augusta National. S5: Jack Nicklaus’ six Masters wins on the 50th anniversary of his first triumph S7: Famous golfers’ girlfriends to watch for during the Masters ONLINE Learn how to hit a hook from local golfer Jimmy Koosa at thestate.com. MORE SPORTS A1: Jackie Robinson’s impact on S.C. race relations C1: What’s the future of USC’s “Zone Read” running game? C1: Jordan Mosely, from Spring Valley, takes winding road to NFL C1: NCAA Final Four SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA WWW.THESTATE.COM • SECTION S
  54. 54. SPORTS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Daily Division SECOND PLACE: The State Staff J erry Jackson’s football coaching career had come to a crossroads. He sat in his 1998 Dodge Caravan in the spring of 2004 and watched as a couple of red lights cycled through at the corner of Chestnut Street and Barhamville Road, the intersection that frames C.A. Johnson High School. Jackson’s 21st season as an assistant high school coach in South Carolina had not gone so well, and it had nothing to do with the fact C.A. Johnson did not win any of its eight games. His frustration had everything to do with a lack of commitment at every turn to the football program. Two games that season were cancelled because C.A. Johnson could field a mere 15 players. Never had Jackson dealt with a fluctuating roster, players joining the team from one week to the next or dropping from the lineup without notice. He found most C.A. Johnson players to be lacking in discipline. Support from home was minimal. “I got depressed,” Jackson said. “Coming from Fairfield (Central High),” he contin- ued, “we had been there and established a program. Jerry Brown came in and got the program going, then Buddy Pough came in and took it to another level. We won a cou- ple of championships. The kids had gotten in the habit of working hard and not missing practice and things.” Jackson paused as he stood eight years later at that same corner of Chestnut and Barhamville, this time in his fourth season as C.A. John- son’s head coach. Then he continued. “You get over here and it’s just the opposite,” he said. “You can’t get them to prac- tice, and they have an apa- thetic attitude about practic- ing football and the amount of work that it takes to get it done. “It was two different mind- sets. It was just overwhelming.” Jackson was headed to church services that Sunday morning in 2004. It was as if his mini-van — like his ca- reer, for that matter — was stuck in park, unable to pull through the intersection and down the block to the Pro- gressive Church of Our Lord Jesus Christ. Jackson said he heard a voice. “You need to be here,” Jackson said God told him. “That’s why I’ve got you here.” From that day forward, Jackson stopped complaining about his situation. He stopped bemoaning the shortcomings of his job. He no longer pleaded with the administration for help. Jackson said he realized his calling was at C.A. Johnson. “God directs our path, regardless of what we say we’re going to do with our lives,” he said. “He puts us in situations where we can either work those situations out or let them go to rest. “We are put in situations to see if we can help somebody or be an example for them. We won’t have an effect on everybody here, but a lot of people here we have some positive effect on them. “We supply them love.” That love was never in short supply throughout the 2012 season, one that started in mid-August with 18 play- ers at the first practice and concluded in early November with 24 players for the final game. In between, Jackson and his assistant coaches went about teaching more than the fundamentals of football. Those coaches — like the C.A. Johnson administration and the faculty — recognize that this is not just about teaching a group of young men how to play football and then saying OK, ‘See you later,’ at the end of the game. This is about affecting those players’ lives, beginning during the season and per- haps lasting forever. Coaching at C.A. Johnson is about forming a family within the team, a family that can trust one another even in the most challenging of situa- tions, a family that learns to respect and trust other male figures. For some, being on the football team means be- ing part of a family for the first — and perhaps last — time in their lives. It was a season in which C.A. Johnson dealt with far more downs than ups. It won only two games. It made the postseason playoffs for only the ninth time since integra- tion of the schools in 1970. The older sister of one player died of sickle cell ane- mia and the younger brother of another was killed when he was struck by a truck. Team members learned to hug one another and march off the field arm in arm no matter the game’s outcome. Before and after every practice, and before and after every game, Jackson huddled his team and asked that each member touch another. In unison, he asked them to chant one phrase that had nothing to do with perform- ing well on the field or calling for a good outcome in a game. “One! Two! Three!” Jack- son shouted. “I believe!” The team answered. ‘I BELIEVE!’ There were more downs than ups for the C.A. Johnson football team but forming a family was an amazing accomplishment C.A. Johnson’s Caesar Nieto leads the team as it makes its way onto the field for the game against Pelion. Corresponding video Visit thestate.com for a photo gallery and a video produced by photojournalist Gerry Melendez exploring the tight weave of C.A. Johnson High School students’ personal lives and their identity as football players. Reporter Ron Morris and photographer Gerry Melendez spent the 2012 season following the C.A. Johnson football team. Ron Morris The State’s sports columnist has won numerous state and national awards and is a five-time winner of the South Carolina sports writer of the year by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association. Gerry Melendez Twenty years of assignments have taken him throughout the U.S. and abroad. His work has been recognized by state, regional and national contests. He is a four-time South Carolina Photographer of the Year by the South Carolina News Photographers Association. Designer Meredith Sheffer, Assistant Sports Editor - Presentation Editor Rick Millians, Executive Sports Editor PROJECT TEAM G2 SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2012 ● WWW.THESTATE.COM ● THE STATE, COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA
  55. 55. SPORTS SPECIAL EDITION OR SECTION All Daily Division FIRST PLACE: The Island Packet Staff RBC Heritage
  56. 56. REVIEW PORTFOLIO All Daily Division THIRD PLACE: The Post and Courier Bo Petersen BY BO PETERSEN The Post and Courier THE LAST TRAIN TO ZONA VERDE. By Paul Theroux. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 353 pag- es. $27. Ebook $27. M aybe the most astonishing thing about Paul Theroux’s travel writing is that a lot of people don’t like it. He’s considered the grumpy old man in the field, continually railing on about this or that disruption of au- thentic culture by modern incursions instead of tour-guiding hungry escapists to the wonders of Bora Bora. This is his genius. Theroux is a real-world traveler: He drops you smack into the dirt and desires of a land and its people. In “The Last Train to Zona Verde,” the chapter called “Three Pieces of Chicken” is one of the finest bits of travel gristle you can chew. Strand- ed in the Angolan bush when the folk taxi he’s riding in breaks down, he writes: “We drank beer, we muttered, we listened, and then it occurred to me that if I didn’t claim a place in the car I would have nowhere to sleep. While they were talking, I went back to the Land Cruiser. I cranked the seat into reclining position, covered myself with my jacket, and to the drumming in the distance and the mutter- ing of boys sitting on the steps of the shed, I sub- sided into sleep. From time to time I awoke, and I was surprised by the gusto of the drumming, but in the darkest hours of morning, it ceased. ... In daylight the place was ugly, more littered and beat up than it had seemed the day before.” The chapter revolves around a bucket holding three blackened limbs of skinny chicken, covered with black flies, offered for sale. He turns them down at first, but then buys them one by one be- cause there’s nothing else to eat. “The Last Train to Zona Verde” might well not be the last go- round from the prolific Theroux. It is, after all, his 46th book of travel, fiction or criticism. He took off on the trip to Southwest Africa after finishing a novel. But it has the feel of his coda. The septuagenarian started his travel life as a Peace Corps volunteer in Malawi in the 1960s and has returned repeatedly to trek and write about a continent he unabashedly loves. This time, though, he’s brooding about his age and mortality in the early chapters, then in the closing chapter, “What Am I Doing Here,” he is coming to terms with his disillusion about what’s become of West Africa: “Of course, I could put my head down and travel farther, but I knew what I would find: de- caying cities, hungry crowds, predatory youths and people abandoned by their governments, people who saw every foreigner as someone they could hit up for money.” Theroux takes you on a rocky safari across infringed wilds, disenfranchised poverty and coven luxury. He introduces you to a boil of angry indig- enous peoples and unsettled migrants you won’t meet on an itinerary tour. This trek opens with him on a spear hunt in Namibia, step- ping over termite hills with bush people, one of the world’s oldest cultures, “pouch-breasted women laughing among them- selves, an infant with a head like a fuzzy fruit bobbing in one woman’s sling, men in leather clouts clutching spears and bows.” Go on, turn the first few pages. Then I dare you to put it down. Reviewer Bo Petersen is an environmental reporter for The Post and Courier. Theroux’s ‘Last Train’Author’s brooding, brilliant stories of Africa hard to put down BY BO PETERSEN The Post and Courier STORM KINGS. By Lee Sandlin. Pan- theon Books. 260 pages. $26.95. There’s no way that saying anything like, “This book is a history of tornado science,” can convince you just how cool it is to read about Ben Franklin as a pre- statesman youngster, offering himself as an agent to a theatrical performer who uses static electricity in a magic show. Or Franklin as a performer himself, setting up stunts like the Lady’s Kiss: “The lady in question would sit in a chair while several aurora tubes were passed over and around her. Then a suc- cession of young men would attempt to kiss her. Each time, the crackling static discharge from her lips and forehead would knock the suitor to the floor.” Lee Sandlin’s “Storm Kings” is full of tales like that, stories with human di- mensions that go well beyond the 1800s controversies over whether, first of all, there were such things as tornadoes, and second, whether they whirled. There are the heroes you’ve never heard of: the Sig- nal Corps officer whose groundbreaking work on twisters was rejected, grudg- ingly accepted, then curtly dismissed by backstabbing federal bureaucrats before becoming a standard of the science. Of- ficer John Finley’s near fatal midwinter climb up Pikes Peak is riveting, as he brings life-saving supplies to the men in one of the country’s first weather stations: “They were obliged to leave the mules behind with the mountaineer to trudge up on foot. The snow grew so deep they were often wading up to their armpits. The weather became increasingly foul. Storms were cresting the mountaintop and spilling down along the slopes; there was thick fog in the ravines and a con- tinuous pelting of rain, sleet and snow. There were terrifying lightning displays and gigantic echoing booms and crashes of thunder. At one point they were caught in a mysteriously charged snowstorm, where every flake left a trail of cold fire through the air, and their hair, beards and fingertips were emitting endless showers of sparks. Whoa. That’s what “Storm Kings” is like. And along the way, Sandlin fends through a line of deadly, twisting historic storms that stand your hair on end. Any story that starts with the wild Franklin and ends with “Mr. Tornado,” the singular tornado researcher Tetsuya Fujita, is a tale worth the telling. Enjoy. Reviewer Bo Petersen is an environ- mental reporter at The Post and Courier. ‘Storm’ a vortex of good storytelling BY BO PETERSEN bpetersen@postandcourier.com BACK TO BLOOD. Tom Wolfe. Little, Brown and Co. 704 pages. $30. “Huge huge huge brilliant brilliant brilliant lurid lurid lurid.” Now don’t be alarmed; that’s not the reviewer. That’s the provocateur-legend Tom Wolfe describing the neon sign for the Honey Pot strip club. Or how about “AhhggghHAHAHHHHock hock hock hockdjou,” his onomatopoeic rendition of a character’s hacking laugh. This is what you’re in for opening “Back to Blood,” the latest carving up of Ameri- can culture by the author of groundswell books such as “The Right Stuff,” “The Elec- tric Kool-Aid Acid Test” and “The Bonfire of the Vanities.” Check your serious face at the door. This is lampoon: over-the-top fun with the boiling unrest of cultures in the unmelting pot of social caste Miami. There are A LOT OF CAPI- TAL LETTERS in this book. Say, for instance: “BEAT thung BEAT thung BEAT thung BEAT thung BEAT thung BEAT thung” repli- cating lurid music booming from the loud speakers dur- ing a yacht club regatta that devolves deck to deck into an offshore orgy. Wolfe burst into popular conscience in the 1960s with New Journalism classics such as the “Acid Test.” No sooner did he become an established anti-establishment figurehead then he turned to produce classics like “The Right Stuff,” the real-people account of NASA astronauts that knocked vaunted James Michener’s “Space” clean off the literary shelf. Then Wolfe wrote “From Bauhaus to Our House,” putting the thumb tacks to malformed 20th- century architecture. So give him slack. “The Bon- fire of the Vanities” had good passages and tedious stretch- es, “A Man in Full” was less than that and “I Am Charlotte Simmons” a sometimes bril- liant but long-winded, not- quite-nailed-down satire of conflicted North Carolina folk and academic cultures. Heck, Clyde Edgerton did it better if far less edgier in “Raney.” But when Wolfe is good, he is very good. “Back to Blood” reels out of control from the interplay of two young, star- crossed Cuban lovers and their body slams into various Miami cultural walls. One is a policeman who wants nothing more than to be respected by his family and community; one a darting socialite wan- nabe who wants nothing more than to shed both. To be sure, there’s some wading to get through this tall tale. But there’s also some real scene gobbling going on, and an ending that packs a hyper- bolic punch. If you want onboard, grab the Dramamine: “And every time a boat rocked, usually thanks to the rolling wakes of speed boats, the bottles and beer cans would roll across the deck ... the beer cans with a cheap junky aluminum rat- tle ... the bottles with a cheap junky hollow moan ... rolled rolled rolled over the flat garbage, the stamped out ciga- rettes, the cheap plastic beads, the spilt-beer slicks, the used condoms, the puke fritters.” Reviewer Bo Petersen is a reporter at The Post and Courier. Wolfe lampoons Miami
  57. 57. REVIEW PORTFOLIO All Daily Division SECOND PLACE: The State Otis R. Taylor Jr. NORTH CHARLESTON A fter two decades serving a sentence on a chain gang, it’s not the laborious conditions of his past life that cause Jean Valjean, the protagonist in “Les Miserables,” to wail in agony. It’s the slip of paper he must carry. It’s a mark, a scarlet letter of condemnation. By the time he sings a soliloquy, falling to his knees at center stage, his pain has become your pain. In other words, you’re hooked. The Broadway in Columbia production of “Les Miserables” is the musical to bring the non-musical fan to see. The two-act stage adaptation of Victor Hugo’s novel, which opens Tuesday at the Koger Center, runs through March 24. A film version of “Les ‘Like visiting an old friend’ Revamped for its silver anniversary, ‘Les Misérables’ opens at the Koger By OTIS R. TAYLOR JR. otaylor@thestate.com Genevieve Leclerc rehearses her part of Fantine at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center as the cast and crew prepare for ‘Les Miserables.’ The show is opening in Columbia at the Koger Center. Opening night is Tuesday; its run concludes March 24. KIM KIM FOSTER-TOBIN/KKFOSTER@THESTATE.COM IF YOU GO ‘Les Miserables’ When: 7:30 p.m. Tues- day-Friday and 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and March 24 Where: Koger Center, 1051 Greene St. Tickets: $46-$66 Information: (803) 251-2222 or www.ca- pitoltickets.com One of the props used in ‘Les Miserables.’ BY THE NUMBERS 9 Number of 53-foot semi- trucks it takes to transport the show. 16 Hours it takes to erect the elaborate set. 8 Hours it takes to tear the set down. 15 Number of traveling set crew members. 75 Number of local stage hands used in each city to build and take down the set. 15 Number of musicians in live orchestra. 400 Number of lights the crew installs in each theater, 100 of which have moving heads.SEE LES MIZ PAGE E2 Kenny Chesney’s return to Williams- Brice Stadium was triumphant, and it was apparent early in the afternoon that the threat of poor weather wasn’t going to keep No Shoes Nation, the name given to Chesney’s fervent fans, from hanging out with their best friend. Hours before Satur- day’s concert, they arrived to party at the pre-concert tailgate called KennyGate. Though official numbers won’t be re- leased until this week, organizers estimat- edtheattendanceat45,000,animpressive number since walk-up ticket sales may have been hampered because of the cool temperatures.Thefollowingareahandful of observations from the daylong event that began at 10 a.m. Get on the good foot: On the very first song of his 2008 stadium concert, Ches- ney broke his foot because of a stage mal- Kenny Chesney pumps up the crowd during his performance Saturday at Williams-Brice Stadium. RENEE ITTNER-MCMANUS/RITTNERMCMANUS@THESTATE.COM ONLINE: Concert photos and fan snapshots. Did our photographer shoot you? Go online and find out at thestate.com METROSUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 WWW.THESTATE.COM SECTION B COLUMBIA SOUTH CAROLINA KENNY’S COLUMBIA COMEBACKBy OTIS R. TAYLOR JR. otaylor@thestate.com SEE CHESNEY PAGE B6 H ip-hop has, unfair- ly, been oft-ma- ligned in Colum- bia. It has existed – thrived, even – in pockets of the city, but tradi- tionally it has been separated, held at a distance from local clubs,barsand,especially,fes- tival stages. Love, Peace and Hip Hop: Columbia Hip Hop Family Day seeks to be inclusive with the genre as the gathering’s foundation. Organized by Non Stop Hip Hop Live, the city’s long- running hip-hop catalysts, the festi- val is one of a hand- ful of music events related to The Indie Grits Festival. Arrested Devel- opment’s perfor- mance at St. Pat’s in Five Points last month might have satiated some who have yearned for hip-hop to be added to the fes- tival.But,forsome, a bitter taste lin- gers from when Wet Willie’s jolted the Free Times Music Crawl in November 2011, two days before the event. It canceled the scheduled sets citing the performers’ foul and violent language. Love, Peace and Hip Hop is an opportunity to show- case hip- hop culture and hip-hop as a cre- ative art form that includes vi- sual art, fashion, dance and poetry. The event is headlined by Kool Moe Dee, a rapper known as much for his wrap- around sunglasses as he is for his rhymes. His hits include “How Ya Like Me Now,” “Wild Wild West” and the burning ballad “Go See the Doctor.” His verse on “Self Destruc- tion,” the hip-hop unity track, was a prescient invective against a community’s – and genre’s – agitated evolution. “Back in the ’60s our broth- ers and sisters were hanged/ How could you gang bang?/ I never ever ran from the Ku Klux Klan/ And I shouldn’t have to run from a black man.” Of course, Kool Moe Dee feuded with fellow rapper LL Cool J in the ’80s. The rappers lobbed sublimi- naldissesateachother.Onthe cover of his 1987 album, “How Ya Like Me Now,” Moe Dee stood in front of a white jeep that had a crushed red Kangol under its left front tire. The significance: The Kangol, a type of hat, was to LL what the sunglasses were to Kool Moe Dee. Moe Dee, a former member of the Treacherous Three, was the first rapper to perform at the Grammy Awards, so he brings history with his perfor- mance in Columbia. There is hope that this festival is histor- ical in a similar manner. Kool Moe Dee THE ASSOCIATED PRESS HIP-HOP A FAMILY AFFAIR The Love, Peace & Hip Hop festival Saturday on Main Street is a free showcase of the culture and creative art form that is hip-hop Otis R. Taylor Jr. otaylor @thestate.com (803) 771-8362 Yameezy PROVIDED PHOTOGRAPHS C O L U M B I A ɀ S O U T H C A R O L I N A FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2013 ɀ WWW.THESTATE.COM ɀ SECTION E WEEKEND INSIDE: Otis Taylor picks his top 15 South Carolina rappers. Page E3 IF YOU GO Love, Peace & Hip Hop When: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat- urday Where: Main Street Tickets: Free Late night: At 9:30 p.m., DJ Shekeese Tha Beast, one of the festival’s organizers, will have his birthday bash at New Brookland Tavern. Special Ed, whose glorious song “I Got it Made” was, arguably, the genesis of popular hip-hop’s addic- tion to lyrical expositions on excess, is the headlin- er. NBT is at 122 State St., West Columbia. $8 Information: www.lovepea- cehiphop.com THE SETLIST 11a.m.: DJ Q Jack Noon: Hip Hop History 101 with the founders of Non Stop Hip Hop Live, DJ She- keese Tha Beast and DJ Kingpin. DJ Prince Ice will spin music through the decades. 12:45 p.m.: Performances by Kevlar and Randy Bruce 1 p.m.: Breakdancing by Battle Holex Crew World- wide 1:30 p.m.: Performances by DJ T.O., Ida Divine and Abys and Redd 2:15 p.m.: Performances by Collard Green, Preach Jacobs, B-Familia Muzik and FatRat Da Czar with Grand Royal 3:15 p.m.: Performance by The Reggie Sullivan Band, Yamin Semali and Kool Moe Dee TODAY AT INDIE GRITS A daily guide to Colum- bia’s film and arts festival, going on through April 21 7 tonight: The Indie Grits Festival opening party. The free party will be held on the 1600 block of Main Street. Say Brother and The Roy- al Tinfoil will perform. There will also be a DJ, food trucks and beer and wine sales. Let’s hope the weather cooperates unlike it did for last week’s First Thurs- days on Main; www.indiegrits.com Look for more stories on the Indie Grits Festi- val at thes- tate.com/ entertainment Ida Divine Rap Shoot MOVIES ‘42’ tells the story of baseball great Jackie Robinson. Review, story, Page E4
  58. 58. REVIEW PORTFOLIO All Daily Division FIRST PLACE: The Post and Courier Adam Parker BY ADAM PARKER aparker@postandcourier.com WASH. By Margaret Wrinkle. Atlantic Monthly Press. 405 pages. $25. A mong America’s biggest problems is its failure to come to terms with its greatest sin: slavery. We know the wound is insufficiently healed. We see its legacy every day in the way forms of rac- ism persist. And we watch, often too passively, as some among us act to prevent healing — exempli- fied most profoundly by the common attitude that “the past is the past,” that the great-great-grandchil- dren of slave owners cannot be held responsible for the actions of their ancestors, that blacks should just get over it already. We know, of course, that these arguments are at- tempts, sometimes deliberate, sometimes subcon- scious, to evade the truth. And the truth is: We need much more of it, along with a lot of reconciliation. Maybe this can eventually happen. Maybe not. Meanwhile, the wound festers. Consider the Tray- von Martin case. So it comes as a terrific surprise, a shock really, to read Margaret Wrinkle’s novel “Wash,” which is all about slaves and slave owners in the early years of the new Republic. It is a graceful book filled with the brutality of slavery and the humanity of those involved. It does not avoid the truth. It does not cut corners. It presents people in full dimension and in con- text, showing how slavery was a complicated and perverse phenomenon that easily educed the evil in some people, but could not simply be dismissed as a mere distortion of history. An entire economic system, a whole culture depended on it. If you were unfortunate enough to be born into this system and culture, whether black or white, you were pretty much stuck. This is not to say that the abolitionist pursuit was either misguided or futile (Wrinkle touches on it in her novel). Many thoughtful people fought against slavery, and that opposition succeeded in chipping away at the institution. Eventually, it won the day. Let’s admit right off that writing novels about slavery is a difficult endeavor indeed. Few have suc- ceeded in conveying the nature of the system while simultaneously presenting believable and sympa- thetic characters. But this did not stop Wrinkle, a native of Birmingham, Ala., who grew up with an intimate knowledge of unresolved racial issues. The title “Wash” reflects the name of its slave-protago- nist, Washington, but it also might be an allusion to the writerly effort to scrub the grime from the issues so they may be seen clearly. ‘Eyes on the clouds’ The story is set in the early 1800s, in Western Ten- nessee, which saw an expansion of the domestic slave trade as settlers ventured forth into the coun- try’s heartland, and it presents characters engaged in a particularly distasteful aspect of slavery: human breeding for commercial purposes. Wash is the child of Mena, a captured African woman purchased in Charleston by the soldier- landowner Richardson. He lends Mena to his friend Thompson, a humane recluse who takes the young African with him to a remote North Carolina island, where he chooses to live out his remaining days. Mena, it turns out, is pregnant. On the island she gives birth to Wash (named by Thompson) and steadfastly holds onto her culture and heritage, pass- ing her knowledge slowly and surely to her young son. Thompson tolerates the “mojo,” affording Mena and Wash plenty of slack. His interest in Mena is infused by affection. In one particularly lovely sequence in which Thompson dis- covers her pregnancy, he teaches her how to swim: “Soon as she lay back, soon as her dark billowy dress lay drenched against her front, I saw her belly for the first time. It reared up so round, I couldn’t believe I hadn’t seen it before. She was good and pregnant. Five months by my best guess. My mouth dropped open as she lay there floating in my palm but she kept her eyes on the clouds. Wouldn’t look at me but she started breathing shallow just like I’d showed her. When I took my hand away, she floated on her own.” Eventually, the old man dies. Mena and Wash are claimed by Thompson’s two brutal sons and put to work on a Tennessee plantation. Wash finds the adjustment difficult. He has grown up to be a hard-headed outsider, unwilling to forfeit his “African” or forget his ancestors. He is tall, dark, handsome, mysterious, and he strikes fear in his fellow slaves who hug their Christian bible and worry about anyone too reluctant to cast his eyes downward in the presence of whites. This gets him a load of trouble, and Wrinkle ren- ders it with all the violence and cruelty it demands, but without excess, always attuned to the context and history of the time. The story is told from the differing perspectives of its main characters; Wrinkle writes mostly in the first-person, shifting quickly from one to another, but she also inserts sections written in the third person. It’s a testament to her achievement that this mash-up unifies into a cohesive, flowing narrative. The reader is pulled along, eager to understand what is going through the minds of each of these fascinat- ing people. Clinging to identity It is perhaps first and foremost a sweeping psy- chological portrait, a lesson in how people under stress adapt, how they connect with one another even when forces beyond their control regularly tear them to shreds. “It’s always the dead who got to stretch out to the living,” Wash says. “You get so you can read a liv- ing man’s mind. See straight into his heart. But what you got to tell him ain’t always what he wants to hear, and the living can be some kind of hard- headed, acting blind to us even when we could save em some real time and trouble. But some things stay slow to learn and I know it can seem easier to slog on the hard way. I remember making that exact same choice myself.” We learn about Richardson’s ambivalence toward slavery, his dependence on Wash, both for com- mercial gain and human interaction. We learn about African traditions and how they were tenu- ously conveyed to the U.S. and into the hearts and minds of those able to listen. We learn about the dysfunctional dynamics among slave communities and between whites and blacks. Above all, we enter the minds of Wash, Mena, Pallas and Rufus, each clinging hard to their African identities in the face of overwhelming odds. To read about how the young Pallas, destined eventually to become an accomplished medicine woman and companion of Wash, was sequestered in an isolated cabin for the purpose of providing sexual relief to the young sons of a slave owner, how she emerged nearly dead inside but somehow found the strength (and the help) to reclaim her soul, is to come face to face with just one of the terrible lega- cies we have yet to confront fully as a society. It is a particularly heartbreaking passage in this remark- able book, yet full of hope and humanity. Or there is the story of Rufus the blacksmith, who takes the young Wash under his wing. After the woman he loves is sold away, he descends into a pit of alcoholism and depression, never to emerge whole again. And there is Wash himself, confused by the changing circumstances into which he has been thrust, yet eloquent and insightful at the same time. The character is fully formed, endearing and sympathetic. He grows and learns, sometimes fretfully, “falling back into the grip of his story,” sometimes with such grace and poetry the reader is left trembling. “It was pretty soon after that day when my time came for me,” Wash recounts. “I guess living full on like I did wore me out. I’d learned not to let my anger light me up so bad, and Pallas stayed steady helping me smooth my edges. But still, my day came much sooner than I thought it might. ... It came right on me out of the clear blue sky. Didn’t have no time to fight it. Felt myself lifted up out of myself, like I’d felt plenty of times before, but I could tell this time was something different. I could tell this time I wasn’t coming back, so I turned my eyes to Pallas.” The reader, privy to the immense psychologi- cal and physical abuse Wash must endure, is left marveling at how his mind and soul could have re- mained intact. In the end, it was his heart that gave out. Wrinkle renders all of this with a carefully simpli- fied language that somehow rings true. She is con- cerned less with capturing the precise nuances of actual speech and more with finding a way to reveal authentic thoughts, ideas, expressions. Her special vernacular is perhaps the key that unlocks this Pan- dora’s Box without permitting the furies of slavery to fly off in all directions. Instead they swirl and churn before us, contained by the intelligence of the writer and the beauty of her novel. It seems to me that “Wash” achieves something extraordinary: a full-fledged confrontation with one of the most difficult aspects of our nation’s history. With a careful, thoughtful application of her pen, Wrinkle has given us an honest and important ex- pression of hope. She has illuminated the darkness of slavery and invited us to explore it as the accom- plices we surely are. With “Wash,” Wrinkle has given us a firm foot- hold that leads in the direction of truth and recon- ciliation. We would do well to take this step. And to thank her for her help. Reviewer Adam Parker is the arts writer and book page editor for The Post and Courier. ‘Wash’Poignant novel on slavery clears view of America’s great sin BY ADAM PARKER aparker@postandcourier.com When it rains it pours. Twice this spring Charleston audi- ences have been treated to perfor- mances of the monumental Verdi Requiem, first presented by the Charleston Symphony Orchestra and Chorus in a special April con- cert, and now again under the baton of Joseph Flummerfelt, the Spoleto Festival’s artistic director for choral activities, who is ceding his position after years of transition to the very talented Joe Miller. Flummerfelt, 76, chose to leave the festival on this note because the Requiem has been one of those pieces close to his heart for a long time. And among the initiated, who doesn’t love it? At TD Arena Thursday night, the Westminster Choir, joined by the CSO Chorus (its recent performance still reverberating in the singers’ ears) and by the Spoleto Festival USA Orchestra, tried to blow the top off the venue, which had been bat- tened down by festival stagehands and acoustician David Greenberg for the occasion. And they sounded fine, if not es- pecially present in the big space. The special concert shell built for the oc- casion was a lot better than nothing, but it couldn’t project the music into the arena with adequate focus and intensity. Nevertheless, patrons were treated to a brisk and beautiful rendition of a work that features divinely hushed moments of spiritual angst and bombastic, full-orchestra flares her- alding the “days of wrath.” Flummerfelt, blessed with a fine chorus and orchestra, and four thoughtful soloists, opted for a somewhat compact interpretation. His tempi were on the quick side, but handled deftly by the singers, who never sounded rushed. His skills were most apparent when the choral “Sanctus” was sung. The singers performed with crystalline precision, a beautiful tone, perfect diction and a joyous understanding of the Latin text (“Holy, holy, holy ... Hosanna in the highest!”) The piece begins with a shimmer- ing, hushed “Requiem” and “Kyrie,” beautifully sung by the chorus and tightly controlled by Flummerfelt. It is critical to keep this opening as quiet as possible (though in the are- na there’s such a thing as too quiet), both to convey a mood of longing and resignation and to provide the necessary contrast to the next sec- tion, the roaring “Dies irae,” which featured two pairs of trumpeters positioned at the top of the arena on either side of the stage, providing a wonderful stereophonic effect. Verdi Requiem in the arena REVIEW BY ADAM PARKER aparker@postandcourier.com ALL THAT IS. By James Salter. Knopf. 304 pages. $26.95. J ames Salter, a writer who does not waste words (or mince them), strikes me as the lit- erary equivalent to painter Andrew Wyeth, who’s masterpiece “Christina’s World” shows a gaunt young woman, unable to walk because of polio, propping herself up in a dry field some distance from her home. We see her from be- hind, looking with what we imagine in longing and frustration at her farm house. The house and its companion buildings seem unreachable astride the top of the bluff, and it’s as if the small grouping of buildings mocks poor Christina, her hair disheveled by the relentless breeze. The horizon line runs high across the painting, and the leaden sky appears to have as much substance and weight as the hard earth. The sense of isolation is palpable. The human- ity in the picture is like a scream. Salter, who shares Wyeth’s northeastern sen- sibilities and writes sparse, poignant prose that captures the essence of things, reminds me of the muted grays and browns, and the careful de- tailing, that the painter applies to his canvases. Never is there too much information; indeed, often there is very little. We get only the basics, yet they convey centuries’ worth of human frailty. In his latest book, the novel “All That Is,” Salter’s famously detached style — his pristine prose, his supernatural ability to get to the heart of the matter and his keen descriptions and dialogue — are on full display, beginning with a remarkable opening about war that establishes the character of Philip Bowman. Salter’s perspective — that detachment, that ability to observe from a distance — perhaps was forged during his years as an Air Force pilot. He turned to writing full-time in his 30s, then pursued a brief career in Hollywood before settling into fiction and memoir. “All That Is” is his fifth novel, and the first since “Solo Faces” was published in 1979. It is quasi-autobiographical insofar as its main char- acter shares certain experiences with its creator: military experience, failed relationships and a certain deer-in-the-headlights wonder at the world, both its beauty and cruelty. The plot, which is really the arc of a whole life, tells of Bowman, who took an early interest in literature and fell into the publishing business in New York City after World War II. He sus- tained a respectable career, met some interesting people and aged with some grace, but not with- out leaving a carcass or two in his wake, and not without hard blows to his naivete. As a writer, Salter is like a bird of prey scan- ning his targets from on high. There is no need to linger one’s gaze on the looming mountains or roiling seas if the object of one’s focus simply scurries along the barren path. In his short stories and novels, Salter hones in on the essence of things, often using just a few perfect words to execute his moves. His dialogue is at once austere and complex, conveying depths of meaning between the lines. Consider this passage from the new novel: Other guests were coming in. Diana left to greet them. Baum stayed to talk on with Christine, he liked her looks. After the party, he asked his wife, “What did you think of Philip’s new girlfriend?” “Is she new?” “Well, not exactly new but certainly not old.” “No, she’s quite a bit younger.” “It’s made him a bit younger.” “Yes, that’s the general belief,” Diana said. From that quick scene, which despite its ca- sualness reveals key details, Salter immediately climbs to a higher altitude and tells us that Bow- man’s ailing mother died that spring. “She had never told him all she knew, nor could he remember all the days of childhood and things they had done together. She had given him his character, a part of it, the rest had formed itself somehow.” This describes, somewhat, Salter’s own writ- ing. He does not tell you all he knows, and his books, including this one, have a magical ef- fect, as if they are meticulously formed by their author yet ready to absorb all that the reader brings along, his own worldview and prejudices, his own failures at love and his halting accom- plishment. Some have accused Salter of misogyny. His male protagonists don’t seem to understand or respect women. Rather, they view women as vessels of sexual desire and mystical creatures meant to consummate some abstract notion of manhood. But I don’t view this as insensitive; Salter is who he is, a product of his time and ex- perience, and he is, I think, acutely aware of this conundrum (which every writer endures, even if they don’t always admit it). When he tells us about Bowman’s cruel ex- ploitation of the young daughter of the woman who had used him mercilessly, mocking his ardor and innocence, Salter seems to be confess- ing his own lifelong misunderstandings and failures. “All That Is” is a deceptively ambitious book. Its relaxed pacing belies its scope and reach. As we follow Bowman through his life and watch (somewhat voyeuristically) his nonchalance, loneliness, sexual escapades, disappointments and bewilderment, we are bearing witness to something truly fundamental: the inescapable reality of the modern, middle-class experience. Bowman is one example of the millions of American men who grope and question and exalt and fail during the course of their compli- cated lives. “All That Is” is Bowman’s particular story, Salter’s version of an imperfect existence. We follow along as a life raft bobbing in gentle waves follows the subtle ocean current. The cur- rent has its direction, yet is infinite. It concen- trates the waters while blending them into the surrounding sea. It knows where it is going but meanders along as if blind to the energies at play all around it. Salter’s lifelong literary work (he is now 88) is like this current: a force that plows through the turmoil of the world but can hardly be felt when we are immersed in its flow. Reviewer Adam Parker is book page editor. ‘All That Is’ James Salter plumbs meaning of modern life in latest novel
  59. 59. GOVERNMENT REPORTING All Daily Division THIRD PLACE: The Greenville News Tim Smith
  60. 60. GOVERNMENT REPORTING All Daily Division SECOND PLACE: The Post and Courier DavidS lade BY DAVID SLADE dslade@postandcourier.com When South Carolina voters got rid of the state’s odd requirement that li- quor be served from minibottles, sup- porters said the change would reduce drunken driving and increase alcohol treatment funding. Neitherofthosepredictionshascome true, a Post and Courier analysis has found. Instead,thestatehasbeentappingits general revenue fund for more than $1 million yearly since free-pour liquor drinks became legal in 2006, to make upforlosttaxesthatsupportanetwork ofalcoholanddrugtreatmentagencies. And the average number of drunk driversinvolvedinfatalSouthCarolina accidentsslightlyincreasedintheyears afterfree-pourbecamelegal,insteadof declining. “WhatIdobelieve,personally,isthat ifwestillhadtheminibottle,wewould have a lot more accidents related to al- cohol,moredivorcesrelatedtoalcohol, and so on,” said former Republican state Rep. Bill Cotty, who led the leg- islative push to get rid of minibottles. IttookachangeinthestateConstitu- tion to allow liquor drinks to be “free MINI IMPACTFree-pour fails to raise funds, lower DUIs GRACE BEAHM/STAFF Bartender Kathy Wiggins pours drinks from minibottles at Terri’s Sports Bar on James Island. Wiggins, who has worked at the bar for 23 years, has always used the 1.7-ounce bottles. 200 300 400 500 ’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 DUI deaths South Carolina fatal wrecks involving intoxicated motorists* in the five years before and after free-pour. Before After *A blood-alcohol level of .08 percent or more. SOURCE:NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMIN.Please see MINIBOTTLES,Page A6
  61. 61. GOVERNMENT REPORTING All Daily Division FIRST PLACE: The State JamieS elf MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2013 | THESTATE.COM The state Senate Education Committee will hear this week from state lawenforce- ment and education officials on what South Carolina can do to ensure its class- rooms are safe in the wake of last month’s massacre of children and educators in Newtown, Conn. Meanwhile, educators across the state are taking steps to improve school safety and assessing whether additional chang- How safe are S.C. schools? Senate panel plans hearing By JAMIE SELF jself@thestate.com WANT TO GO? The Senate Education Committee will meet at 10 a.m. Thursday in Room 105 of the Gressette Build- ing on the State House grounds to discuss the safety of S.C. schools. SEE SCHOOLS PAGE A6 INSIDE Guns and money compete for new Congress’ attention, A3 Gov. Nikki Haley wants to fold the S.C. Arts Commission into the State Museum, a move that would eliminate the arts group’s board and director but leave intact its grants program. Asked about Haley’s proposal Tues- day by state House budget writers, Ken May, the commission’s executive direc- tor, said, “It eliminates the Arts Com- mission, so you can imagine I’m not the biggest fan of that.” Haley has proposed severe cuts to the Arts Commission before. In 2012, the first-term Republican governor recommended eliminating the agency, saying its administrative costs were too high. When lawmakers ignored her, Haley vetoed the agency’s funding. Lawmakers overrode her Haley wants to merge Arts Commission into State Museum By JAMIE SELF jself@thestate.com SEE ARTS PAGE B3
  62. 62. HEALTH REPORTING All Daily Division THIRD PLACE: The Greenville News Liv Osby

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