Integrating IWB's into the classroom

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Powerpoint describing the process of change teachers need to be aware of as they start to integrate IWB in their classrooms. Also includes examples of how to use the IWB as a digital hub.

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Integrating IWB's into the classroom

  1. 1. Integrating ICT and Interactive Whiteboards in the Classroom
  2. 2. Purpose <ul><li>On completion participants will: </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge: be able to to create whole class, small group and learning centre activities using ICT and IWB software elements </li></ul><ul><li>Application: take away three ideas of how to use ICT effectively during Literacy Dedicated Time. </li></ul>
  3. 3. World wide changes in ICT and Education
  4. 5. Ubiquitous Computing <ul><li>What will be next? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we prepare ourselves and our students? </li></ul>
  5. 6. Reflection time <ul><li>Go to the website </li></ul><ul><li>www.pd-for-ICT.wikispaces.com </li></ul><ul><li>Go to your school page and then the discussion page and respond to the question – How does the rate of change in ICT make you feel? </li></ul>
  6. 7. Reflecting on Classroom Practice
  7. 8. Reflecting on Current Practice <ul><li>Share a successful lesson (that incorporated ICT) with your partner. What was it that made them work well? </li></ul><ul><li>Share an unsuccessful lesson with your partner. What was it that limited it’s success? </li></ul>
  8. 9. Reflecting on Current Practice <ul><li>Tools for Reflection </li></ul><ul><li>CBAM affective domain </li></ul>
  9. 10. CBAM Stages of Concern
  10. 11. Stage 0: A teacher is either unaware of the proposed innovation or is not interested in using it. Affective Dimension of Change: Concerns Based Adoptive Model Horsley & Loucks-Horsley “ I am not concerned about it. ”
  11. 12. Stage 0: A teacher is either unaware of the proposed innovation or is not interested in using it. Stage 1 (Informational): A teacher asks questions on hearing something new Affective Dimension of Change: Concerns Based Adoptive Model Horsley & Loucks-Horsley “ I would like to know more about it. ”
  12. 13. Stage 0: A teacher is either unaware of the proposed innovation or is not interested in using it. Stage 1 (Informational): A teacher asks questions on hearing something new Stage 2 (Personal): A teacher asks how it might affect them Affective Dimension of Change: Concerns Based Adoptive Model Horsley & Loucks-Horsley SELF “ How will using it affect me?”
  13. 14. Stage 0: A teacher is either unaware of the proposed innovation or is not interested in using it. Stage 1 (Informational): A teacher asks questions on hearing something new Stage 2 (Personal): A teacher asks how it might affect them Stage 3 (Management): A teacher engages with new skills, time demands, materials etc. Affective Dimension of Change: Concerns Based Adoptive Model Horsley & Loucks-Horsley SELF TASK “ I seem to be spending all my time getting the material ready”
  14. 15. Stage 0: A teacher is either unaware of the proposed innovation or is not interested in using it. Stage 1 (Informational): A teacher asks questions on hearing something new Stage 2 (Personal): A teacher asks how it might affect them Stage 3 (Management): A teacher engages with new skills, time demands, materials etc. Stage 4 (Consequence): A teacher considers how to make the innovation work better for learners Affective Dimension of Change: Concerns Based Adoptive Model Horsley & Loucks-Horsley SELF TASK IMPACT “ How is my use affecting the kids?”
  15. 16. Stage 0: A teacher is either unaware of the proposed innovation or is not interested in using it. Stage 1 (Informational): A teacher asks questions on hearing something new Stage 2 (Personal): A teacher asks how it might affect them Stage 3 (Management): A teacher engages with new skills, time demands, materials etc. Stage 4 (Consequence): A teacher considers how to make the innovation work better for learners Stage 5 (Collaboration): A teacher works with colleagues to make the innovation work better Affective Dimension of Change: Concerns Based Adoptive Model Horsley & Loucks-Horsley SELF TASK IMPACT “ I am concerned about relating what I am doing with what other instructors are doing ”
  16. 17. Stage 0: A teacher is either unaware of the proposed innovation or is not interested in using it. Stage 1 (Informational): A teacher asks questions on hearing something new Stage 2 (Personal): A teacher asks how it might affect them Stage 3 (Management): A teacher engages with new skills, time demands, materials etc. Stage 4 (Consequence): A teacher considers how to make the innovation work better for learners Stage 5 (Collaboration): A teacher works with colleagues to make the innovation work better Stage 6 (Refocusing): Having been successful with the innovation, a teacher seeks a further challenge Affective Dimension of Change: Concerns Based Adoptive Model Horsley & Loucks-Horsley SELF TASK IMPACT “ I have some ideas about something that would work even better.”
  17. 18. Stage 0: A teacher is either unaware of the proposed innovation or is not interested in using it. Stage 1 (Informational): A teacher asks questions on hearing something new Stage 2 (Personal): A teacher asks how it might affect them Stage 3 (Management): A teacher engages with new skills, time demands, materials etc. Stage 4 (Consequence): A teacher considers how to make the innovation work better for learners Stage 5 (Collaboration): A teacher works with colleagues to make the innovation work better Stage 6 (Refocusing): Having been successful with the innovation, a teacher seeks a further challenge Affective Dimension of Change: Concerns Based Adoptive Model Horsley & Loucks-Horsley SELF TASK IMPACT
  18. 19. What is the research saying about integrating IWB’s in the classroom?
  19. 20. How are they being used? <ul><li>IWBs are mainly being used: </li></ul><ul><li>as a data projector which can navigate to multiple screens; </li></ul><ul><li>as a surface which can generate a dynamic rather than static form of display; </li></ul><ul><li>to enhance presentation from the front of the class. </li></ul>
  20. 21. New Technology, Old Pedagogy <ul><li>Imagine an early nineteenth century engineer concerned with the improvement of cross-continental transportation. Someone comes to them with a design for a jet engine. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Great&quot; the engineer says &quot;we'll attach this to stagecoaches to assist the horses.&quot; When they try they soon see that there is a danger that the engine would shake the vehicle to pieces. </li></ul><ul><li>So they made sure that the power of the engine was kept down to a level at which it would not do any harm. (It is not on record whether it did any good.) </li></ul>
  21. 22. Doing the Sums Nicholas Abbey TECHNOLOGY PEDAGOGY old pedagogy + old technology low performance improvement old pedagogy + new technology mild performance improvement new pedagogy + old technology mild performance improvement new pedagogy + new technology high performance improvement
  22. 23. Interactivity <ul><li>Physical interactivity . where the focus is on .going up to the front. And manipulating elements on the board; </li></ul><ul><li>Technical interactivity . where the focus is on interacting with technological facilities of the board; </li></ul><ul><li>Conceptual interactivity . where the focus is on interacting with, exploring and constructing curriculum concepts and ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>FULL POTENTIAL IS NOT BEING REALISED </li></ul>
  23. 24. Observations from the classroom <ul><li>Mostly utilised for demonstration at the beginning of the lesson </li></ul><ul><li>Lower order thinking skills </li></ul><ul><li>Closed questions: ask, respond, evaluate </li></ul>
  24. 25. A Productive Pedagogy Toolkit for IWB’s
  25. 26. <ul><ul><li>Images </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sound </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Animation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Peripherals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Graphic organisers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Britannica </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning objects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interactive PowerPoint's </li></ul></ul>Digital Hub
  26. 27. Collaboration http://webmaths.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/81935.jpg
  27. 28. Demonstrations http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3664/3592995504_5298cd0fba.jpg
  28. 29. Brainstorm http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/env_ed/assets/images/brainstorm.jpg
  29. 30. Interaction http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/env_ed/assets/images/brainstorm.jpghttp://www.callinpractice.net/IWB/iwbinmflclassrooms/images/annotate/image_preview
  30. 31. Modelling http://sites.google.com/site/huntedweb/_/rsrc/1257432316077/xIWB-full.jpg?height=276&width=369
  31. 32. Higher Order Thinking Skills
  32. 33. Higher Order Thinking Skills Remembering - Recognising, listing, describing, identifying, retrieving, naming, locating, finding Understanding - Interpreting, Summarising, inferring, paraphrasing, classifying, comparing, explaining, exemplifying Applying - Implementing, carrying out, using, executing Analysing - Comparing, organising, deconstructing, Attributing, outlining, finding, structuring, integrating Evaluating - Checking, hypothesising, critiquing, Experimenting, judging, testing, Detecting, Monitoring Creating - designing, constructing, planning, producing, inventing, devising, making Lower Order Thinking Skills (LOTS) Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS)
  33. 34. Higher Order Thinking Skills Before we can understand a concept we have to remember it Before we can apply the concept we must understand it Before we analyse it we must be able to apply it Before we can evaluate its impact we must have analysed it Before we can create we must have remembered , understood , applied , analysed , and evaluated .
  34. 35. Higher Order Thinking Skills TASK: Consider a number of lessons you have done recently – try to classify them according to the Taxonomy. What do you notice about the type of lessons you create?
  35. 36. Varying Usage <ul><li>Grouping structures </li></ul><ul><li>Whole class </li></ul><ul><li>Small group </li></ul><ul><li>Individual? </li></ul><ul><li>Lesson sequence </li></ul><ul><li>Explicit instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Activity with teacher </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Centre </li></ul><ul><li>Plenary </li></ul>Task: Work with a partner. What possibilities could you design for one of the structures or sequences listed on the left?
  36. 37. Blockers <ul><li>What are the main blockers when using ICT in the classroom.. </li></ul><ul><li>Write down 2-3 blockers </li></ul><ul><li>What can be done to alleviate or minimize the blockers? </li></ul><ul><li>Write down 2-3 solutions </li></ul>
  37. 38. Afternoon Task
  38. 39. Afternoon Task <ul><li>This afternoon : </li></ul><ul><li>Plan a lesson incorporating ICT </li></ul><ul><li>Create your lesson (s) </li></ul><ul><li>Present your plans to the larger group using 10/20 or 20/20 format. (10 or 20 slides, you talk on each slide for 20 sec. Set to automatically advance after each slide. ) </li></ul>
  39. 40. Final reflection <ul><li>Go to the www.pd-for-ict.wikispaces.com site again and post a comment on the Good Shepherd page under the subject of ‘Goals for Term Four’ </li></ul>
  40. 41. Acknowledgements <ul><li>Thanks to Louise Cimetta for the original ideas and organisation. </li></ul>

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