Mixing Messages & Methods: Examing News Content on Facebook & Twitter

570 views

Published on

Presentation from Beyond Convergence conference, Oct. 26, 2013, University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
570
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Mixing Messages & Methods: Examing News Content on Facebook & Twitter

  1. 1. Mixing messages & methods Dr. Jennifer Brannock Cox @jencox416
  2. 2. introduction • Changes in audience news-gathering habits • Changes in presentation of news • Changes in framing • Changes in audience preferences
  3. 3. Pew research center, 2012 Facebook users spent an average of 423 minutes each on the site in one month. By contrast the average time spent on a top 25 news site is just under 12 minutes per month. Even in 2010, all but one of those top news sites, with the exception being Google News, obtained a portion of their traffic from Facebook.
  4. 4. Study purpose • To determine how news organizations are using Facebook & Twitter to distribute their messages • To determine what type of messages are being distributed on each platform
  5. 5. Mixing messages • Limited to 140 characters • Not as limited in text • More searchable • Very visual • More connections with strangers with shared interests • Moves more into personal lives • More immediate • More sharing of news stories • More traffic to news
  6. 6. Hypotheses & RQs • News organizations will post more frequently on Twitter than on Facebook • Facebook: • More evergreen, lifestyle, helpfulness features & soft news • More staff & contributor-written articles • Twitter: • More spot news, crime, disaster, politics & hard news • More wire & news partner articles/links • RQs: • Which platforms will contain posts on more international or domestic stories?
  7. 7. twitter
  8. 8. facebook
  9. 9. method • Constructed 7-day week from Twitter & Facebook • Sample: up to 20 per day from each organization from each site • Six publications based on top online circulation: • Online-only – Yahoo! News & Huffington Post • TV: CNN & MSNBC • Newspaper: New York Times & Washington Post • Coding for: • • • • • Author type Geographic focus News topic Timeliness Story type N = 1,232
  10. 10. Post distribution
  11. 11. Huffington post
  12. 12. Authors
  13. 13. Geographic focus
  14. 14. topics
  15. 15. topics
  16. 16. topics
  17. 17. timeliness
  18. 18. Story type
  19. 19. Story type
  20. 20. Summary of findings • News organizations posted more frequently on Twitter than on Facebook (except CNN) • Facebook contained: • More evergreen, lifestyle, helpfulness features & soft news • More staff & contributor-written articles • Twitter contained: • More spot news, disaster, politics & hard news • More wire & news partner articles/links • Domestic focus the same • Twitter – more international • Facebook – more without geographic focus
  21. 21. gatekeeping • Journalists decide what audiences need to know • Readers on Facebook and Twitter are getting different information • Readers are gatekeepers, too • Sharing different information across platforms • Emphasis on some topics over others can lead to misconceptions about the state of the world or importance of issues • Facebook – selfishness? Niche topics? Less news overall? • Twitter – polarization? Misinformation of spot news? Indifference or desensitization?
  22. 22. Future study • Cross-reference data to look more closely at variables • Qualitative interviews with subjects – why? • Audience effects of exposure/usage of sites Twitter: @jencox416 Facebook: Jennifer Brannock Cox

×