Hard Road to Employment for Those with Criminal Records

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Hard Road to Employment for Those with Criminal Records

  1. 1. It’s a Hard Road to Employment for Those with Criminal Records Only 35% of people with criminal histories hold a job in the United States. “Stigma” and “discrimination” are two big obstacles when it comes to finding jobs for those who have criminal records 65 million Americans with criminal records are banned from being hired at the best known U.S Companies People with criminal records often need to wait 3 to 20 years of “redemption time” before finding employment But, Did You Know? Ex-offenders with jobs commit fewer crimes than those without jobs Jobs have been proven to help with recidivism Less recidivism means less crime
  2. 2. A Few Surprising Facts… One third of Americans have been arrested by the age of 23 13 million people are admitted and released from jail every year and incarceration rates are higher in the United States than in any other country in the world Jails are being more commonly used as a replacement for psychiatric and addiction recovery institutions The number of people incarcerated with severe mental illness (SMI) is estimated to be between 6 and 16 percent of the incarcerated population Federal, state and local government spending on jails exceeds $74 billion annually
  3. 3. My Solution to The Problem… Is to make and distribute a brochure that educates small business owners about: The need to give equal opportunities to those with criminal backgrounds Helping those in need and their families to be contributing members of society Helping to lower crimes rates and recidivism Helping to decrease the amount that is spent on corrections
  4. 4. Sponsor I will be contacting the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) in Montgomery, Alabama and perhaps seeking a federal grant

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