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Active Learning and Educational Technologies

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Presentation about eLearning in Higher Education

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Active Learning and Educational Technologies

  1. 1. Teaching with Educational Technologies Jeff Van de Poël | Senior Instructional Designer | Researcher Institut pour la Formation et la Recherche en Enseignement Supérieur Université de Liège - Belgium
  2. 2. SESSION OVERVIEW • PART I : Some information and facts about eLearning and Educational Technologies. • PART II : Some thoughts for teachers starting to use Educational Technologies. • PART III : Around “blended learning” and various scenarios. • PART IV : What About MOOCs • PART V : The gently difficult management of attentional resources.
  3. 3. PART I : Some information and facts about eLearning and Educational Technologies Dated 2014
  4. 4. Higher Education landscape is changing … So are the Students
  5. 5. AN INSTRUCTOR GENERALLY SAYS 100-200 WORDS A MINUTE AND A STUDENT ONLY HEAR 50-100
  6. 6. IN A TYPICAL LECTURE CLASS, STUDENTS ARE ATTENTIVE JUST 40% OF THE TIME
  7. 7. STUDENTS RETAIN ABOUT 70% OF WHAT THEY HEAR IN THE FIRST 10 MINUTES OF CLASS - AND JUST 20% DURING THE LAST 10 MINUTES
  8. 8. IMPORTANT FACTS • MOST OF LEARNING PROCESS HAPPENS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM • THIS ENVIRONMENT NEED TO BE PREPARED BY TEACHER FOR STUDENTS.
  9. 9. ABOUT LMS (PLATFORMS) USE : “Most faculty members -- 58 percent, according to the survey -- said they primarily use their system as a place to store content such as lecture notes and the syllabus, while 41 percent said they use it to interact with students outside the classroom.” Dahlstrom, Brooks and Bichsel (2014) Educause Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR)
  10. 10. Main information from last ECAR study on Academics and Educational Technologies • Faculty recognize that online learning opportunities can promote access to higher education but are more reserved in their expectations for online courses to improve outcomes. • Faculty interest in early-alert systems and intervention notifications is strong. • The majority of faculty are using basic features and functions of LMSs but recognize that these systems have much more potential to enhance teaching and learning. • Faculty think they could be more effective instructors if they were better skilled at integrating various kinds of technology into their courses. • Faculty recognize that mobile devices have the potential to enhance learning.
  11. 11. ECAR STUDY ABOUT STUDENTS AND TECHNOLOGIES • Technology is embedded into students’ lives, and students are generally inclined to use and to have favorable attitudes toward technology. • Students’ academic use of technology is widespread but not deep. They are particularly interested in expanding the use of a few specific technologies. • Many students use mobile devices for academic purposes. Their in-class use is more likely when instructors encourage such use; however, both faculty and students are concerned about their potential for distraction. • More students than ever have experienced a digital learning environment. The majority say they learn best with a blend of online and face-to-face work. • Most students support institutional use of their data to advise them on academic progress in courses and programs. Many of the analytic functions students seek already exist in contemporary LMSs.
  12. 12. Link to ECAR studies • http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/2014- student-and-faculty-technology-research-studies
  13. 13. To summarise : • Teachers need to prepare extended learning environment for their students. • They must think about various ways to propose learning contents and activities to their students. • It’s normal that teachers start to use technologies in a basic way at the beginning. • Creating an online learning environment is a longtime process.
  14. 14. PART II : Some thoughts for teachers starting to use Educational Technologies
  15. 15. Technology is not an independent variable in the learning process « It is in the relationship between ICT and pedagogy that are all the potential benefits for teaching and learning. (Depover, Karsenti et Komis, 2007, p.7). » Objets à Potentiel Cognitifs “Teaching methods prevail on the media” (Clark, 2007) OBJECT WITH COGNITIVE POTENTIAL
  16. 16. TPACK MODEL A framework for teacher
  17. 17. For Schulman (1996) Teaching is the relation between Knowledge Content and Pedagogical Content
  18. 18. With the development of technologies CONTENT KNOWLEDGE PEDAGOGICAL KNOWLEDGE TECHNOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE
  19. 19. TPACK (Koehler&Mishra, 2006)
  20. 20. Professional development with Educational Technologies(Koehler&Mishra, 2009). "Teaching effectively with technology" "Know the pedagogical techniques that use technology constructively to teach the content" "Understanding the representations of concepts using technology" "Knowing what is difficult or easy to learn and how technology can help correct some of the problems encountered by students" "Prendre en compte les connaissances préalables des élèves et des théories de l'épistémologie à l’aide des technologies » "How technologies can be used to build on existing knowledge to develop new epistemologies or strengthen existing"
  21. 21. Le S.A.M.R. A framework to integrate Educational Technologies to your teaching practice
  22. 22. • Creating a database of questions with rich feedback for revisions ( or learning ) . • Prerequisite testing for LAB Augmentation
  23. 23. Modification
  24. 24. 10 integrative questions Groups of 4 to 6 students Answer through multimedia Peer review Module Neurologie – BAC 3 Médecine (Ulg) Pr. Garraud et C. Pasquet, Assistante Modification
  25. 25. Syllabus en pdf Collection of articles VidéosPresentations Chap. 1 Chap. 2 Chap. 3 Links Substitution
  26. 26. • Therapy training in psychology with the presence of attention indicator. • Many various situations available • Many different use of a video support. Redéfinition
  27. 27. PART III : Around “blended learning” and various scenarios
  28. 28. Une définition “We define blended learning as structured opportunities to learn, which use more than one learning or training method, inside or outside the classroom. This definition includes different learning or instructional methods (lecture, discussion, guided practice, reading, games, case study, simulation), different delivery methods (live classroom or computer mediated), different scheduling (synchronous or asynchronous) and different levels of guidance (individual, instructor or expert led, or group/social learning).” Pankin, Roberts & Savio (2012)
  29. 29. Different ways to blend
  30. 30. Dossier de lecture + activités ? Syllabus en pdf Collection articles VidéosPrésentations Chap. 1 Chap. 2 Chap. 3 Liens Activités
  31. 31. Flipped Classroom
  32. 32. Prerequisite checking … 12/20
  33. 33. Statistiques (ISHS)
  34. 34. Structured modules… Chapitre 1 Test formatif Chapitre 2 Test formatif
  35. 35. Etude de cas
  36. 36. Online Exams Création des bases de questions examen Mise en ligne dispositif Réservation de la salle Passation
  37. 37. PART IV : What about MOOCs ?
  38. 38. What are Moocs ?
  39. 39. edX
  40. 40. COURSERA
  41. 41. Attributes of major providers
  42. 42. PART V : The gently difficult management of attentional resources Some advice
  43. 43. Visual support for courses. Paper support for students Audiovisual support MULTIMEDIA For teachers
  44. 44. FRAMEWORK •We are in a mode in which learners are in a “receiving information” posture. •They are confronted to a message , information transmitted through a combination of at least two of these elements (images, text, sound, voice, pattern , etc.)
  45. 45. MEMORY PROCESS
  46. 46. LIMITED Attention resources
  47. 47. Attention resources spread !! Attention resources
  48. 48. Jamet – Le Bohec (2003) -------------- -------- ------------- --------- KNOWLEDGE TESTING 1 2 3
  49. 49. Some tips
  50. 50. 1. Verbal coding • An image can be verbaly translated => Usefull for language learning => Dangerous when too much interpretation is needed
  51. 51. 2. Expertise level Experts Colored images Animation Multimédia et apprentissage – LabSET –IFRES 2011 Dia 54 Novices need more attention than experts to assimilate new content. Novices
  52. 52. 3. The pause • Propose Pauses - Consolidation - Elaboration - Preparation
  53. 53. 4. Around Audio • Give user the choice to play or stop • Avoid surprise effect • No need to overload • Go to the essential
  54. 54. Mayer’s Principles Some principles to guide you
  55. 55. 1. Coherence Principle The principle of coherence is to remove non- essential information for learning: students learn better if the media and educational content available to them focus on a specific item, rather than a content too broad or too general.
  56. 56. 2. Signaling Principle This principle based on the observation that the underlined of bold information is retained better than others : report essential information allows learners to better focus their attention and increase retention rates by reporting the underlined items .
  57. 57. 3. Redundancy Principle Contrary to what one might think , have identical information in two different modalities can be detrimental to learning ( eg . To display the equivalent screen of the oral text). During a presentation , so do not integrate too much text in your slides , and prefer the use of keywords.
  58. 58. 4. Spatial Contiguity Principle The principle of spatial contiguity means that visual information which are close to each other facilitates learning (eg . A Keyword Association // image or keywords // diagram). This is particularly the case diagrams and legends associated with it .
  59. 59. 5. Temporal Contiguity Principle Just as the spatial proximity of visual information , the fact strengthen their proximity in time also facilitates learning. To facilitate the working memory task ( eg . As part of a presentation ), so synchronize the appearance of your slides based on your speech!
  60. 60. 6. Segmenting Principle The principle of segmentation reveals that students learn best when educational content is segmented : that is to say, cut into several sequences, rather than a large block of indigestible information (eg 3 times 5 minutes . rather than 15 minutes at once) . This keeps the attention of learners and to avoid overloading their working memory.
  61. 61. 7. Pre-training Principle According to the pre- training principle , it is better learners already spread key information about the content (of course , training ...) before the main learning sequence. This allows them to warm up and already build vital neural connections to the acquisition of new knowledge.
  62. 62. 8. Modality Principle The modality principle reflects in part the principle of redundancy ( see above ) in the sense that , to present an image (eg on the screen as in the case of a presentation. ), It is preferable to use oral rather than written comments . This is to avoid the saturation of video channels in the learner .
  63. 63. 9. Multimedia Principle To promote information processing and learning more effective , choose the integration of visual elements in your slide , syllabi, teaching notes ... Participants will learn better from a combination of words and images, rather that mere words (eg . explanatory illustrations in a book or in a syllabus )
  64. 64. 10. Personalization Principle As part of a training course (face or online) or presentation , use a conversational style of language rather than formal. Speak directly to your participants using YOU . Learners will tend to retain more personalized information and best practice !
  65. 65. Will video killed the amphitheatre star ? Video use in my everyday pratice
  66. 66. Existing videos to illustrate my courses
  67. 67. How to use them ? BEFORE • For students to discover some new concepts • To remember prerequisites DURING • To illustrate a concept • For case studies AFTER • For various illustrations about concepts • For validating resources proposed by student
  68. 68. How to manage your video ? • Create an account : VIMEO, YOUTUBE, ETC • Upload your videos • Embbed them in your teaching material VIMEO nous paraît la meilleure solution pour le moment, il propose aussi un abonnement annuel à 60,5 EUR permettant des options de publication privées et une interface intuitive et efficace.
  69. 69. ATTENTION A LA DILLIGENCE … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3omwHv3Cmog
  70. 70. Audiovisual module with PPT and ISPRING FREE
  71. 71. Using during classes http://www.ulg.ac.be/cms/c_1775092/fr/sketsha-la-table-virtuelle
  72. 72. Prepare teaching sessions https://vimeo.com/80985952
  73. 73. Welcome students to your course https://vimeo.com/84670247
  74. 74. Illustrer des concepts https://vimeo.com/77771700
  75. 75. Some Examples … • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeXIV-wMVUk • Encore mieux : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ty9QSiVC2g0 Some interesting chanels : • https://www.youtube.com/user/1veritasium • https://www.youtube.com/user/MIT • https://www.youtube.com/user/khanacademy • https://www.youtube.com/user/coursera • https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC67Vc0fkLYeUPBp1f02VY9Q

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