Social Media For Good 19 Oct 2009

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Provides a "101" tutorial on social media technologies and the way they are used to advance corporate social responsibility or cause marketing. Particular emphasis on frameworks to enhance a company's effectiveness at identifying the right tools and using them effectively.

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Social Media For Good 19 Oct 2009

  1. 1. Social Media for Good Erik Kiewiet de Jonge Jeff Shah 19 October 2009 Leading Through Innovation For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  2. 2. Social Media Roadmap: Where We’re Heading 4. Social media in 3. Frameworks practice: 1. Define social 2. Social media • Risk management for using social media technologies • CSR reporting media • Branding • Innovation For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  3. 3. What is social media? 4. Social media 3. Frameworks in practice: 1. Define 2. Social media for using social • Risk management social media technologies • CSR reporting media • Branding • Innovation For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  4. 4. Social Media is the new buzz, but… My organization already has a web strategy. Do we need a social media strategy? Who actually uses social media to advance sustainability initiatives? Will my organization lose message control if we use social media? Does social media add corporate value? Twitter? Facebook? Aren’t these for personal use only? For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  5. 5. What is Social Media? Web 2.0 Participation Creation Affiliation Trust Broadcasting Community sharing Simplicity “THE LONG TAIL” For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  6. 6. Web 1.0 vs. Web 2.0 Source: David Ciccarelli, CEO of Voices.com "The days of companies being able to push whatever they want into your box and influence you are waning. It was probably never the right thing to do to begin with, but it was all we had in the past.“ - Bob Pearson, former head of Dell's social media efforts For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  7. 7. So we have a sense of what social media is … … but remember what social media is not: ● Just a technology – it’s about sharing information ● Just flashy content and slick graphics – it’s about greater interaction and participation between users ● About every single web user – it’s about the (relatively) few active ones ● Just for tech savvy kids – it’s gaining popularity with every demographic and age group For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  8. 8. Your customers and stakeholders are talking about you. Have you been listening? To traditional channels? To social media outlets? How can you measure and assess the conversation level? So, a few people on twitter are chattering. Big deal? What are the implications of viral communication? For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  9. 9. Following the Conversation: United United damaged a musician’s guitar during a flight and refused to pay damages…. In the past passengers had limited ability to bring this to the public’s attention, but social media has changed everything. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  10. 10. Following the Conversation: United’s Social Media Firestorm 86,889 posts In a matter of a few 19,715 posts weeks this past 6,755 posts summer, the following 5,828 posts conversations on 3.3 million YouTube views United’s guitar incident occurred: 400+ changes made to United entry in 2009 For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  11. 11. Following the Conversation: The Twitter Chatter Intensifies United being bashed on the guitar fiasco… on For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  12. 12. Following the Conversation: Social Media Trend Analyses United apologizes For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  13. 13. The conversation is happening. Will you be listening? Can you afford not to listen? Tools exist to help you track the conversation and assess trends. Will you join the conversation? For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  14. 14. Social Media Technologies 4. Social media 3. Frameworks in practice: 1. Define social 2. Social media for using social • Risk management media technologies media • CSR reporting • Branding • Innovation For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  15. 15. Top Social Media Technologies for Business …based on current usage and expected potential Blogs Microblogs Online video Social networks Crowdsourcing Interactive games Wikis For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  16. 16. Here’s a crash course on social media technologies For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  17. 17. Blogging 101 Overview/ Definition: Demographics and Statistics: – Blogs allow companies to present the facts, clarify – Estimates suggest 70% of active internet users – misconceptions and address stakeholder concerns 346 million people - regularly read blogs1 in a conversational forum – 16% of Fortune 500 companies have externally – Allows users to leave comments, transforming facing corporate blogs2 blogs into active dialogue forums – Estimates suggest that business related blogs Business Case: account for roughly 12% of readers’ regular blog visits3 – Build trust and credibility through frequent – 36% of internet users report thinking more communication positively about companies that blog4 – Manage how issues evolve in the market through connection to corporate strategy Keys to Success: – Blogs are often perceived as extensions of the marketing department, so refrain from using blogs as just a sales platform – Be honest and transparent about difficult issues— present facts, clarify misconceptions and answer concerns – Incorporate many voices from the business to show a high level of corporate engagement – Align content to corporate strategy, ensuring a consistent message For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  18. 18. Blogging Success in Action: McDonald’s Values in Practice Overview McDonald’s Corporate Responsibility Vice-President Bob Langert and other employees author the Values in Practice Blog, which discusses CR challenges faced by McDonald’s. What we like The blog’s integrated online video, news postings and traditional corporate responsibility reports give readers a rich experience. A diverse group of CR managers’ personal, conversational writing tones and willingness to allow controversial comments on blog entries give the blog credibility. McDonald’s achieves a moderate balance between marketing and CR discussions. What we’d like to see While McDonald’s addresses difficult topics, authors hesitate from directly soliciting stakeholders on McDonald’s biggest CR challenges. Furthermore, continued and enhanced references to third-party reports on CR issues material to McDonald’s would add credibility. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  19. 19. Microblogging 101 Overview/ Definition: Demographics and Statistics: – Blogging typified by users sending brief text – Primary user base: technology oriented teens and updates (usually less than 140 characters) twentysomethings – Content differs from traditional blogging in – Twitter is the third most subscribed social networking service, with over 10 million users3 that it tends to be highly topical and time sensitive – Increasing presence in mainstream media, including regular use on CNN, BBC, etc. Business Case: – Gaining traction among older demographics (e.g. – Anticipate and manage conflicts as they Congressional Twittering), though still a nascent develop1 technology – Immediacy has the potential to shape stakeholder perceptions in real-time2 – Gather pulse of the public Keys to Success: – Match personality to the company culture – Be casual and use humor where appropriate – Use micro-blogs to hook readers and then send them to resources with more extensive information – Stay engaged: micro-blogging is a conversation and followers are likely to notice if you are absent For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  20. 20. Microblogging Success in Action: @WholeFoods on twitter Overview Whole Foods maintains a corporate Twitter account and individual store accounts to monitor and respond to customer and stakeholder comments and concerns. Whole Foods’ tweets regularly respond to environmental questions related to products and store operations, while also facilitating discussions of sustainability issues. What we like Whole Foods demonstrates its commitment to directly addressing customer concerns through an effective mix of customer service, data gathering and sustainability conversations. Its “tweeters” judiciously use tweets as product or discussion launch points. Hypothesis: Whole Foods’ twittering may be able to What we’d like to see influence customers at point- Adding names and titles of employees on “Twitter of-sale duty” would add a personal touch while increasing the dialogue on Whole Foods’ largest sustainability challenges would strengthen credibility and solicit valuable feedback. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  21. 21. Online Video 101 Overview/ Definition: – Individuals, companies and media increasingly Demographics and Statistics: share videos online for the general public – Nearly 400 million people worldwide watch online video clips, with 70% watching weekly1 – Embedded video clips have become the norm on social networks, blogs and web pages – Online video transcends demographics, though younger users tend toward YouTube while older Business Case: viewers use traditional media providers2 – Online video helps stakeholders visualize your – YouTube remains the dominant online video site, companies’ challenges – show and tell may be holding 42% marketshare3 more personal, memorable and impactful – Online video continues to grow exponentially – Creates buzz around sustainability issues across the globe – Damage control through addressing stakeholders directly through video response – Creates personal connection to your company – Gather stakeholder perspectives through monitoring comments (widely used features on sites like Youtube) Keys to Success: – Beware of online video’s viral nature – creating a video buzz can be both good and bad – Tone is key, especially when putting leadership on camera. Often a casual and conversational tone can generate greater levels of trust from viewers For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  22. 22. Online Video Success in Action: Starbucks’ YouTube Channel Overview Starbucks created its own YouTube channel to showcase its videos addressing new product launches, sustainability initiatives like (STARBUCKS) RED, and organic coffee production and sourcing. What we like Starbucks features a mix of polished commercials and amateur- feeling, more serious videos, which avoids making the Starbucks Channel a marketing-only venue. Many of Starbucks’ videos are humorous, educational and action-inspiring. What we’d like to see A playlist organizing videos directly pertaining to Starbucks’ sustainability efforts would make navigation easier while videos featuring Starbucks executives discussing sustainability challenges would demonstrate management’s strong commitment. Three of Starbucks’ YouTube videos have 400k+ views For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  23. 23. Interactive Games / Virtual Worlds 101 Overview/ Definition: Demographics and Statistics: – Interactive games and virtual worlds use – Virtual worlds attract millions of users every day computer simulations to let users explore and at some of these sites: manipulate a modeled scenario or • Second Life: 14M registered (July 08) environment • Habbo: 138M registered (June 09) – Some companies have chosen to develop their • Whyville: 3M to 10M users own tool while others engage on an existing • Club Penguin: 15M to 30M users platform – Online games drew 217 M users in 2007, who Business Value: average 5.8 hours per week playing. Males – Due to their immersive nature, interactive edge out females 58% to 42%.2 worlds allow users to explore sensitive topics – 20% of all adults (18+) play online games.3 – Potential to build communities around shared experiences and passions – Opportunity to educate consumers on specific issue or challenge – Opportunity to facilitate conversations and collaborations between multiple stakeholders Keys to Success: – Link strongly to the company’s strategy / core message to ensure greatest traction – Make the game as realistic as possible – Reward users for their time and input to further encourage engagement For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  24. 24. Interactive Games Success in Action: Chevron Energyville Overview Chevron created a game called “Energyville,” which lets users choose how to power a virtual city of 5.9 million people, making trade-offs between costs, environmental effects and political pressure. What we like Forces players to recognize the complex nature of energy generation. The game makes it impossible to power the virtual city only with renewable energy sources, but also makes it unsustainable environmentally to power it only with fossil fuels. Chevron clearly makes the point that cities must use a variety of power sources. What we’d like to see More realistic choices. The tradeoffs mandated in the Energyville game are not necessarily true for every country, let alone every part of America. Forcing players to make artificial or arbitrary tradeoffs between cost, political will and environmental consequences may open Chevron up to criticism. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  25. 25. Social Networks 101 Overview/ Definition: – Social networks from external platforms like Demographics and Statistics: Justmeans, Facebook and Linkedin to company – Globally, 57% (272M) of internet users have developed groups focused on specific issues created a profile on a social network1 – Smaller social networks sponsored by companies – Social network users are active, with more than have rallied consumers around specific issues or 30% participating daily2 products – Facebook, the most popular social network, attracts more young, female participants than any Business Case: other demographic. However, more men and older – Companies can identify issues that are important to users are starting to register. stakeholders by monitoring user activity and postings – By staying active and communicating often with members of a social network, companies demonstrate a commitment to forming relationships with stakeholders and are listening to feedback – An opportunity to build trust by directly addressing stakeholder concerns online Keys to Success: – Branded pages in social networks need purpose to create engagement – just putting a brand on a page serves little purpose – Staying active on the site and interacting with members encourages dialogue and puts a personal face on the company For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  26. 26. Social Networks Success in Action: Timberland – Justmeans Overview Instead of relying on stakeholders to come to its own website, Timberland posts its corporate responsibility report on Justmeans, a social responsibility networking site. What we like The corporate responsibility report is easier to read and reaches a much larger audience than most CR reports. Most importantly, the public gets to weigh in on Timberland’s progress, ask questions and receive feedback from the company. What we’d like to see More comments by the public. Timberland has done a great job getting its content on the Justmeans network, but has yet to amass a large following (currently under 400 people following Timberland). For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  27. 27. Wikis 101 Overview/ Definition: Demographics and Statistics: – Wikis enable users to contribute or modify – Wikispaces, a popular wiki hosting platform, content, track contributions, store files, boasts 2,100,000 members and 900,000 wikis conversation threads and data in one location – In 2007, 32% of companies already used an – While Wikipedia is the most famous example, most internal wiki, and 33% were planning to use wikis are used as collaborative workspaces by one in the next two years1 companies or work teams Business Case: – Improve a work team’s efficiency by helping users gather, organize and store information, communicate across the organization and reduce the amount of emails sent – Levarage collective intelligence to solve problems or answer questions Keys to Success: – Allow organic growth from a grass-roots effort vs. top-down enforcement – Provide an easily understood architecture while granting employees ownership and responsibility For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  28. 28. Wikis in Action: Best Buy “The Loop Marketplace” Overview Best Buy created “The Loop Marketplace” wiki as a component of their broader internal social network, Blue Shirt Nation. What we like Employees communicate with each other on topics of their choosing. This has led to frank discussions of customer service, product ideas and company policy. Best Buy has even honored the participation by actually changing some of its policies (e.g. email access for employees) and adding products (e.g. Geek Squad Gaming Services) based on feedback from the wiki. What we’d like to see More participation - currently, only 20,000 of the 140,000 employees use the wiki. While this is an impressive number, it means there are 120,000 employees who either don’t know how to use the wiki or don’t see the value. And these 120,000 are largely the employees that interact with customers every day, making them valuable sources of information. By making it clear that Best Buy is willing to listen and act on employee ideas, the company will increase participation. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  29. 29. Crowdsourcing 101 Overview/ Definition: Types of Crowdsourcing: – Crowdsourcing harnesses the collective power of – Collective intelligence, or crowd wisdom – groups to create content and solve problems gathering information from groups to solve problems, inform policy or predict results – It leverages the principle that groups are generally more knowledgeable and more powerful than – Crowd voting – using crowd’s judgments to individuals organize vast quantities of information (e.g. Google’s Page Rank) Business Case: – Folksonomy / social tagging (sub-set) – Given its ability to gather huge amounts of data from thousands of users, the clearest use of – Crowdfunding – tapping the collective crowdsourcing is product development and pocketbook, allowing large groups of people to innovation become a source of funds (e.g. Kiva) – Tools like social tagging can help companies research and catalogue industry trends to get a read on what the public at large thinks – Outsourcing small tasks to a potentially unlimited crowd as part of a larger project (e.g. SETI @ home) Keys to Success: – Demonstrate commitment to acting on user contributions to encourage continued involvement For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  30. 30. Crowdsourcing in Action: Whole Foods, getsatisfaction.com Overview Whole Foods engages with customers on getsatisfaction.com, an internet site dedicated to connecting consumers and companies on issues that matter to them. Millions of consumers generate questions and comments, and companies have the chance to respond openly. What we like Hundreds of Whole Foods employees are members of the site and answer questions candidly. All members (companies and consumers alike) must sign the “Company-Customer Pact1,” which outlines the rules of polite, candid, transparent and thoughtful engagement. What we’d like to see It’s not always clear when Whole Foods is responding to a customer question or when another user is responding. There should be some way (other than stating that the user is a Whole Foods employee) of indicating that this is a response by someone affiliated with the company. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  31. 31. Frameworks for using social media 4. Social media 2. Social 3. Frameworks in practice: 1. Define social media media for using social • • Risk management CSR reporting technologies media • Branding • Innovation For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  32. 32. Now that you know more about social media, here’s a few ways to think about how to use it more effectively… For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  33. 33. Business Value Matrix How well do social media technologies promote brand awareness? Facilitate CSR reporting? Help manage risk? Foster innovation? Which one suits my needs? Social Crowd- Interactive Online Blogs Microblogs Wikis Networks sourcing Games Video • Brand awareness • Risk • Risk • Brand and management • Brand • Risk management awareness reputation • Brand awareness management • CSR Proven and • CSR awareness • Fostering and • Brand reporting Strengths reputation reporting and innovation reputation awareness • Brand • CSR • Fostering reputation • Fostering and awareness reporting innovation • Fostering innovation reputation and • Risk innovation reputation management Potential • Fostering • CSR • Risk • Risk • CSR Strengths innovation reporting management management reporting • Brand awareness • Risk and • CSR • Fostering • Fostering Weaknesses management reputation reporting innovation innovation • CSR reporting Based on evidence of existing and potential business uses For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  34. 34. Who Does Social Media Reach? Statistics Source: Universal McCann It’s not just teenagers Social Network Social Media Research Wave 3 RSS Subscribers (160M) Members and 20-somethings… (272M) Global Read Key Insights: Watch blogs Social online video (346M) ● Traditionally social media users are young, though older users are Media (394M) becoming more active Statistics Share ● LOHAS consumers more active Video online than “conventional” Clips counterparts1 (303M) Microbloggers (10M+)3 Download ● Users differ across platforms – be Podcasts (215M) cognizant of your desired audience 40% % of bloggers post frequently about brands they love or hate2 For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  35. 35. You’ve seen the size of the user base, but remember that some users have more influence than others. “The 1% Rule” of Web Content Be aware of the contributors and commentators and 1% Contribute 1% 9% 90% 9% Comment know how their 90% Consume content affects the consumers For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  36. 36. Making It Work: Degree of Control Low Crowdsourcing, Message Control Social Networking Medium Message Control Microblogs, Wikis High Message Blogs, Online Control Video, Interactive Games For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  37. 37. Making It Work: Achieving Trust and Credibility Trustworthy and credible social media examples have: • Tell the good and the bad – • Having substance avoids a you can leave out the ugly marketing-only persona • Honesty is disarming and • Good style shows that builds respect you’re world class • Video and audio are inherently • Be conversational to put a more personal and help human face on the issues achieve more credible Transparency Substance transparency & Style • Facilitate two-way dialogues Collaboration Relevance • Keep on top of the issues • Respond to credible critics • Update your online • Form stronger partnerships presence often with stakeholders • Be relevant to readers • Encourage dissenting views to build trust For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  38. 38. Resource Intensity: How Much Does it Cost? Social media tools require varying levels of time and money. Generally, they adhere to the following spectrum: Microblogging Online Video Crowdsourcing Low Resource High Resource Intensity Intensity Blogging Wikis Virtual Social Networks Worlds/Games For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  39. 39. Social Media Challenges and Solutions Challenges Solutions Disarm through rapid, personal 1. Critics and activists organize easier response; engage early to understand concerns Guide and participate in 2. Losing control of the conversation conversation; cultivate advocates 3. Conversation is permanent and So is your conversation! widespread Social media tools can distill 4. Too many voices voices into trends Social media is inexpensive to 5. Development cost is high maintain, and brings efficiency and scale to engagement For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  40. 40. Social media in practice 4. Social media in practice: 2. Social 3. Frameworks 1. Define social media for using social • Risk management media technologies media • CSR reporting • Branding • Innovation For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  41. 41. How does social media enhance risk management? Social Risk Mgmt Media Tactics Strengths ● Monitor reputation and issues in real-time ● Regain some control of the conversation ● Engage where critics are organizing ● Capitalize on viral information distribution ● Move from reactive to proactive For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  42. 42. Case Example: jetBlue CEO Apology on YouTube JetBlue’s CEO David Neeleman apologized to jetBlue customers following 1000+ flight cancellations around Valentine’s Day 2007. 354,471 views Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-r_PIg7EAUw For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  43. 43. Best Social Media Technologies for Risk Management Proven Potential Weak Blogs Online video Crowdsourcing Social networks Microblogs Interactive Wikis games For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  44. 44. Risk Management Best Practices ● Determine your strategy for monitoring your online reputation … but don’t forget about the offline world ● Respond quickly and through the appropriate channels … but don’t sacrifice quality or alignment with corporate strategy ● Be transparent and authentic in your responses … but remember the potential for your shared information to spread and be long-lasting For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  45. 45. How does social media enhance CSR reporting? CSR Social Reporting Media Efforts Strengths ● Bring CSR reporting issues to life ● Solicit feedback on CSR challenges ● Address readers’ short attention spans ● Reach a broader audience ● Connect disparate information and resources For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  46. 46. Case Example: Timberland’s Justmeans CSR Reporting For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  47. 47. Best Social Media Technologies for CSR Reporting Proven Potential Weak Blogs Online video Microblogs Crowdsourcing Social networks Interactive Wikis games For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  48. 48. CSR Reporting Best Practices ● Use social media to make your CSR reporting more accessible and engaging for existing stakeholders… but don’t ignore the potential to reach a much larger audience ● Make information consumable for those with short attention spans … but don’t water it down too much ● Encourage comments and feedback … but be prepared for criticism For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  49. 49. How does social media enhance CSR branding efforts? CSR Social Branding Media Goals Strengths • Generate mass awareness • Engage, educate and empower • Build relationship with consumer • Reach niche consumer segments • Manage consumer perception of brand For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  50. 50. Best Social Media Technologies for Branding Proven Potential Blogs Online video Crowdsourcing Wikis Social media has exceptionally high Microblogs Interactive Social networks branding potential games For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  51. 51. Case Example: Häagen-Dazs Loves Honey Bees Häagen-Dazs connects cause marketing, corporate strategy and branding through viral online video For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  52. 52. CSR Branding Best Practices ● Avoid making your social media presence just a sales pitch … but leverage consumers’ strong passion for sustainability ● Use social media to join (and shape) the conversation about your brand … but recognize that, ultimately, consumers own the brand ● Be consistent with social media CSR communications - across multiple platforms and with other corporate social media campaigns … but don’t feel like you have to do everything For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  53. 53. How does social media enhance sustainable innovation efforts? Social Innovation Media Goals Strengths • Spread development tasks over many individuals • Get deep and broad consumer insights • Build a fully-interactive partnership with end-users • Leverage a potentially unlimited number of experiences and views For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  54. 54. Best Social Media Technologies for Innovation Proven Potential Weak Crowdsourcing Wikis Social networks Online video Microblogs Blogs Interactive games For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  55. 55. Case Example: MyStarbucksIdea.com Starbucks leverages the collective intelligence of its customers to generate new product and operational ideas For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  56. 56. Case Example: MyStarbucksIdea.com Starbucks takes uses customer feedback to foster product and CSR innovations For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  57. 57. Fostering Innovation Best Practices ● Use “the crowd’s” wealth of opinions and perspectives … but be aware that many contributions will not be relevant or valuable to your business ● Engage with all participants … but be sure to reward the most valuable contributors and communicate progress on their ideas ● All of us are smarter than any one of us…but only when “all of us” are somewhat qualified to address the challenge at hand For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  58. 58. Social Media for Good – Key Insights For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  59. 59. Key Insight #1 Social media has an interesting relationship with message control – it can both enhance and weaken it. Sometimes weaker message control can mean stronger credibility and greater participation from stakeholders. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  60. 60. Key Insight #2 Social media can be a low cost, high reach, value- generating platform for engaging with stakeholders and generating real business value. But remember, not all social media technologies are cheap replacements for offline business processes. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  61. 61. Key Insight #3 Social media leverages collective intelligence to raise, discuss and solve sustainability challenges. And, often, the “crowd” – as a whole – can help accomplish more than your organization can acting alone. For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  62. 62. Key Insight #4 Social media for sustainability issues succeeds best when aligned and integrated with corporate strategy. Marketing & Competitive Sales Positioning CSR Web Presence For more information, contact Erik Kiewiet de Jonge (erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu) or Jeff Shah (jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu)
  63. 63. Acknowledgements For their support on this project. Special thanks to Professor Kellie McElhaney and CRB Director Jo Mackness. For sponsoring the consulting engagement that resulted in this presentation. Special thanks to Michael Sadowski, Alex Hammer and Katie Fry Hester.
  64. 64. About the authors Erik Kiewiet de Jonge Jeff Shah Haas MBA Candidate 2010 Haas MBA 2009 ● Background in management consulting ● Background in marketing and sustainability erik_kiewiet@mba.berkeley.edu jeff_shah@mba.berkeley.edu

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