League of Nations and Cartoon Analysis

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League of Nations and Cartoon Analysis

  1. 1. Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.
  2. 2. What is the message of this cartoon?
  3. 3. Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ To do this question, you need first to borrow two concepts from English: Denotation (what you see) Connotation (how it affects its audience) This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.
  4. 4. Denotation Soldiers rest having captured a town. Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ Connotation They wear the uniforms of German, Italian and Spanish fascists. Meaning German, Italian and Spanish fascists have united to conquer Spain. This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.
  5. 5. Denotation In the background there is a landscape of destruction. Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ Connotation They are winning. Meaning Spain is falling to a fascist war of aggression. This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.
  6. 6. Denotation Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ The soldiers are reading a newspaper headline: ‘Spain – League Discussions.’ Connotation The League disapproved of the fascist involvement in Spain. Meaning But it is not DOING anything – only talking (as usual); the members cannot agree on a course of ACTION. This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.
  7. 7. Denotation One soldier mocks the idea that nations could unite for peace. Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ Connotation The irony is that they have united for war. Meaning The League – meant to bring collective security – has failed to unite to stop the aggressors. This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.
  8. 8. Finally, always remember to look at: Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ Origin (who drew it) Date (when it was published) This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.
  9. 9. Origin The British cartoonist David Low. Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ Details Low supported the League, hated the fascists, and wanted the League to stand up to them. Significance This cartoon echoes the despair of people like Low at the failure of the League to act. This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.
  10. 10. Date 14 December 1936. Fascist soldiers read a newspaper with the headline: ‘SPAIN – League Discussions.‘ One says: ‘The League! Pah! Fancy suggesting nations could unite for PEACE.’ Details In the middle of the Spanish civil war, after Germany and Italy had intervened. Significance People could see the fascist powers were using Spain as a dress rehearsal for war; they were depressed that the League could not stop them. This cartoon by the British cartoonist David Low, appeared in the Evening Standard newspaper, 14 December 1936.

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