Edu 710 literature review_jefferson hartman

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Edu 710 literature review_jefferson hartman

  1. 1. Using Data-Collection 1 Running head: USING DATA-COLLECTION DEVICES TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’ UNDERSTANDING Analysis of “Using Data-Collection Devices to Enhance Students’ Understanding” Lapp, Douglas A., Cyrus, Vivian Flora (2000) Using Data-Collection Devices to Enhance Students’ Understanding. Mathematics Teacher. Vol. 93 No. 6, pp. 504-510. By Jefferson Hartman Touro University College of Education In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For EDU 710 March, 2010
  2. 2. Using Data-Collection Abstract The purpose of the paper is to review an article that identifies four areas of difficulty students face when attempting to graph and model physical concepts. These areas include connecting graphs with physical concepts, connecting graphs with the real world, transitioning between graphs and physical events and building graphical concepts through students discourse. This article addresses how data collection devices might help correct students’ misconceptions about graphing physical concepts. 2
  3. 3. Using Data-Collection 3 Analysis of “Using Data-Collection Devices to Enhance Students’ Understanding” The data collection devices referred to in this article, Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL), Calculator-Based Laboratory (CBL) and Calculator-Based Ranger (CBR), collect data with probes and store the data into a computer. To what extent do these devices used in conjunction with graphing technology aid a science or mathematics classroom is the problem being research. Decreased costs of these devices and probes have allowed more classrooms to utilize this technology. While working with high school students at a Mathematics, Physics, and Advanced Technology Exploration Day, the authors observed students trying to reproduce a position time graph by walking. Many of the students walked in a path resembling the shape of the graph, which clearly identifies a misunderstanding of the distance data. Methods From research, the authors identified 4 areas of difficulty (1) connecting graphs with physical concepts (2) connecting graphs with the real world (3) transitioning between graphs and physical events (4) building graphical concepts through students discourse. The authors were able to recognize these areas by coding the data collected through work done by many other researchers. These researchers identify either supportive research or a specific factor that may affect the link between a graph and a physical event. Results The authors site several researchers in order to explain this difficulty, connecting graphs with physical concepts. The factors that affect this connection include: (1) the
  4. 4. Using Data-Collection immediacy of graph production, (2) student’s ability to control the environment, (3) MBL maintained a graph for constant reference, (4) MBL gave a sense of confidence, (5) variety of graph samples, and (6) extending knowledge from one discipline to another. When trying to connect graphs to the real world, the second difficulty, students often believe the shape of the graph should match the shape of the physical event. When a student is transitioning between graphs and physical events, the third difficulty, they must be flexible. Evidence suggests that successful transitioning occurs when a student can leap from physically modeling a problem to graphing a problem to putting the problem into a mathematical form. Different physical events can produce similar looking graphs and similar events can produce different looking graphs. Exposing students to this experience will force students annul some of their graphic misconceptions. The final difficulty, building graphical concepts through student discourse, can negatively or positively reinforce the link between graphs and physical events depending on the approach taken. Sometimes cooperative groups will converge on a misconception. This problem can be alleviated if a whole group discussion follows an exploration. Since misconceptions are often well set into the mind, multiple discussions must take place in order to replace them with accurate conceptions. Discussion When students are connecting graphs to physical events, the authors came up with several suggestions: (1) make a prediction(s) about what will happen before an experiment, (2) perform duplicate experiments, (3) reproduce a given graph motion by acting it out, (4) find relationships among different kinds of graphs, and (5) analyze different graphs of the same event. The authors also give reasons why MBL technology 4
  5. 5. Using Data-Collection 5 is useful in connecting graphs and physical events: use multiple modalities, directly link real time with graphic representations, provide realistic experiences to scientists taking part in real world practice and reduce time consuming graph production. They suggest that MBL technology has benefits, yet we must pay attention to how technology is implemented. In fact, some technology can impede understanding. The authors and researchers seem to agree that there are benefits to MBL technology, yet further study needs to done.
  6. 6. Using Data-Collection 5 is useful in connecting graphs and physical events: use multiple modalities, directly link real time with graphic representations, provide realistic experiences to scientists taking part in real world practice and reduce time consuming graph production. They suggest that MBL technology has benefits, yet we must pay attention to how technology is implemented. In fact, some technology can impede understanding. The authors and researchers seem to agree that there are benefits to MBL technology, yet further study needs to done.

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