Avoiding Plagiarism

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Presented to CW102 students at Mitchell College on March 11, 2010.

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Avoiding Plagiarism

  1. 1. Avoiding Plagiarism<br />Jeff Dickens<br />Instruction and Electronic <br />Resources Librarian<br />
  2. 2. “Plagiarism: This is a serious offense involving premeditated cheating in written assignments. It involves claiming credit for certain aspects of work and thoughts not strictly one’s own.”<br /> - Mitchell College Student Handbook, p. 11.<br />
  3. 3. Types of plagiarism<br /><ul><li> Copying word-for-word, or “cut-and-paste.”
  4. 4. Excessive quotations, also called “stringing quotes.”
  5. 5. Loose paraphrasing (even with proper attribution).
  6. 6. No attribution, or leaving out the citation to the source of your information.</li></li></ul><li>Quotations<br />I add a word which was not in the verbal conversation. In telling this tale I attempt no compliment to my own sagacity. I claim not to have controlled events, but confess plainly that events have controlled me.<br />
  7. 7. Quotations<br />After three years of civil war, Abraham Lincoln seemed to refute Thomas Carlyle's Great Man Theory when he said in a letter to Albert Hodges in April of 1864, “I claim not to have controlled events, but confess plainly that events have controlled me” (586). <br />
  8. 8. Paraphrasing<br />In reality the United States did much more than fall [sic] to send troops. It led a successful effort to remove most of the UN peacekeepers who were already in Rwanda. It aggressively worked to block the subsequent authorization of UN reinforcements.<br />Samantha Power on the failure of U.S. foreign policy to prevent the Rwanda Genocide: Samantha Power, "Bystanders to Genocide: Why the United States Let the Rwandan Tragedy Happen." The Atlantic Monthly 288.2 (Sept. 2001): 86.<br />
  9. 9. Paraphrasing<br />Original text: In reality the United States did much more than fall [sic] to send troops. It led a successful effort to remove most of the UN peacekeepers who were already in Rwanda. It aggressively worked to block the subsequent authorization of UN reinforcements.<br />Student paper: Samantha Power points out that during the crisis in Rwanda, the most powerful nation on earth was active in its negligence to confront what was clearly genocide. The United States even prevented the United Nations from confronting the tragedy (86).<br />Works Cited<br />Power, Samantha."Bystanders to Genocide: Why the United States Let the Rwandan Tragedy <br /> Happen." The Atlantic Monthly 288.2 (Sept. 2001): 84-108.<br />
  10. 10. Paraphrasing<br />European crops and other desirable plants flourished in the Indies even when disgracefully neglected by farmers gone crazy for gold and conquest; so we can be sure that the imported weeds, which thrive on neglect, did very well indeed.<br />Alfred Crosby on the often overlooked subject of how Old World ecology followed Old World settlers into the New Worlds: Alfred W. Crosby, Ecological Imperialism: the Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900 (New York: Cambridge U.P., 1986). <br />
  11. 11. Paraphrasing<br />Original text: European crops and other desirable plants flourished in the Indies even when disgracefully neglected by farmers gone crazy for gold and conquest; so we can be sure that the imported weeds, which thrive on neglect, did very well indeed..<br />Student paper: Alfred Crosby explains that opportunistic European weeds did well on New World soil as European farmers neglected their crops in favor of other distractions (150) .<br />Works Cited<br />Crosby, Alfred W. Ecological Imperialism: the Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900. New <br /> York: Cambridge U.P., 1986. <br />
  12. 12. Paraphrasing<br />In its tactics and makeup, it [the NAACP] represented not simply the experience and outlook of blacks but those of a larger American liberalism.<br />Alonzo Hamby on the NAACP in the context of modern American liberalism: Alonzo Hamby, Liberalism and Its Challengers: From F.D.R. to Bush. 2nd Ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992 [1985]. <br />
  13. 13. Paraphrasing<br />Original text: In its tactics and makeup, it [the NAACP] represented not simply the experience and outlook of blacks but those of a larger American liberalism. <br />Student paper: Alonzo Hamby points out that in its methods, the NAACP represented not only the experience and respective outlook of African Americans, but it also represented those from the broader scope of American liberalism (140).<br />Works Cited<br />Hamby, Alonzo. Liberalism and Its Challengers: From F.D.R. to Bush. 2nd Ed. New York: Oxford <br /> University Press, 1992 [1985]. <br />
  14. 14. Paraphrasing<br />
  15. 15. Citations<br />Works Cited<br />Crosby, Alfred W. Ecological Imperialism: the Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900. New <br /> York: Cambridge U.P., 1986. Book<br />Power, Samantha."Bystanders to Genocide: Why the United States Let the Rwandan Tragedy <br /> Happen." The Atlantic Monthly 288.2 (Sept. 2001): 84-108. Article<br />United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Poverty in the United States: 1998. Sept. 1999. 12 Nov. 1999 <br /> < http://www.census.gov/prod/99pubs/p60-207.pdf >. Website<br />
  16. 16. Citations<br /> MLA parenthetical (in-text) citations:<br />1. The author is mentioned in the text.<br />2. The author is not mentioned in the text.<br />3.More than one work is used by the same author.<br />
  17. 17. Citations<br />1. The author is mentioned in the text.<br />Samantha Power points out that during the crisis in Rwanda, the most powerful nation on earth was active in its negligence to confront what was clearly genocide. The United States even prevented the United Nations from confronting the tragedy (86).<br />Works Cited<br />Power, Samantha. "Bystanders to Genocide: Why the United States Let the Rwandan Tragedy <br /> Happen." The Atlantic Monthly 288.2 (Sept. 2001): 84-108.<br />
  18. 18. Citations<br />2. The author is not mentioned in the text.<br />During the crisis in Rwanda, the most powerful nation on earth was active in its negligence to confront what was clearly genocide. The United States even prevented the United Nations from confronting the tragedy (Power 86).<br />Works Cited<br />Power, Samantha. "Bystanders to Genocide: Why the United States Let the Rwandan Tragedy <br /> Happen." The Atlantic Monthly 288.2 (Sept. 2001): 84-108.<br />
  19. 19. Citations<br />3. More than one work is used by the same author.<br />During the crisis in Rwanda, the most powerful nation on earth was active in its negligence to confront what was clearly genocide. The United States even prevented the United Nations from confronting the tragedy (Power, “Bystanders” 86).<br />Works Cited<br />Power, Samantha."Bystanders to Genocide: Why the United States Let the Rwandan Tragedy <br /> Happen." The Atlantic Monthly 288.2 (Sept. 2001): 84-108.<br />--. Chasing the Flame: Sergio Vieira de Mello and the Fight to Save the World. Penguin Press: <br /> New York, 2008.<br />

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