Asthmatic children transitioning from acute care to community-based managed care

267 views

Published on

Principal Investigators: Kenny Kwong (DHS), Paul Fu (UCLA/Harbor)

UCLA CTSI-Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (DHS) Projects

Asthmatic children with frequent asthma exacerbations require preventative long term care to reduce morbidity, yet many of these patients belong to community health care organizations (HMOs) without a network/contracted pediatric emergency department (PED). This may result in no transition from costly acute to cost effective preventative care, poor disease control and leading patients to use the PED in “revolving door” fashion. It is unclear whether lack of transition from acute to chronic asthma care occurs between the PED at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (HUMC) and out of network community HMOs and whether this leads to increased asthma morbidity. This current study compares pediatric asthma patients who receive regular asthma care at HUMC versus community HMOs with primary outcomes being asthma control, asthma PED visits, asthma hospitalizations, preventative provider visits and asthma controller prescriptions. Results will identify barriers to smooth transition of asthmatic care between 2 health care systems that can be targeted to improve care to asthmatic children.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
267
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Asthmatic children transitioning from acute care to community-based managed care

  1. 1. PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF ASTHMA CONTROL, ASTHMA  MORBIDITY, QUALITY OF LIFE AND HEALTH CARE  EXPENDITURE IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN DURING  TRANSITION FROM ACUTE CARE AT HARBOR‐UCLA MEDICAL  CENTER (HUMC) BACK TO COMMUNITY MANAGED CARE  ORGANIZATIONS  (Are we as competent as the community?)  Kenny Kwong M.D. Allergy‐Immunology  Paul Fu Jr. M.D. General and Emergency  Pediatrics  Harbor‐UCLA Medical Center 
  2. 2. BACKGROUND  •  Poor asthma control (symptoms) and morbidity (urgent care  visits and hosp.) has not significantly decreased in the  greater Los Angeles area DESPITE advances in asthma care  and treatment.  In parAcular among minority inner city  children.  •  AsthmaAc children in the South Bay area regularly use the  pediatric emergency (PED) department at HUMC for acute  care.  •  It is unknown whether asthmaAc children belonging to  community managed care organizaAons who used HUMC  PED for acute care receive effecAve long term preventaAve  care for their asthma. 
  3. 3. Harbor‐UCLA Pediatrics ED  Community managed care  Research QuesNon:  Do asthmaNc children cared for by community HMO’s  receive less consistent long term preventaNve care compared to similar  patents managed byHUMC in a pediatric medical home?  And therefore  use the PED at HUMC in a  “revolving Door manner?”   
  4. 4. Methods  Asthma pa2ents  Presen2ng to   HUMC PED  (12 month period)   3 month  3 month  3 month  Asthma control test (ACT)  Asthma quality of life (QOL)  ED visits  HospitalizaNons  HUMC care  Community HMO care  3 month  3 month  3 month  3 month  # asthma controllers  #asthma relievers  #asthma specific care provider visits  #asthma specialist visits  Asthma Control  Asthma morbidity  Health care   u2liza2on  Preventa2ve care  Telephone  Administered quesNonnaire  (100 paNents)  Mail out quesNonnaire  (all paNents)  3 month 
  5. 5. HUMC care  Community HMO care  Asthma control and morbidity  Asthma control  Asthma QOL  Asthma urgent care  Asthma hospitaliza2ons  PreventaNve asthma care  # asthma controllers  #asthma relievers  #asthma specific care provider visits  #asthma specialist visits  Asthma control and morbidity  Asthma control  Asthma QOL  Asthma urgent care  Asthma hospitaliza2ons  PreventaNve asthma care  # asthma controllers  #asthma relievers  #asthma specific care provider visits  #asthma specialist visits  VS  VS  Outcomes:  1. Asthma control and morbidity.  2. PreventaAve asthma care 
  6. 6. Asthma pa2ents  Presen2ng to   HUMC PED  (12 month period)   3 month  3 month  3 month  3 month  HUMC care  Community HMO care  General Pediatrics clinic/provider visit (level 3, CPT 99213): $21.40 Asthma Specialist (Level 3 CPT: 99215): $57.20 General Pediatrics urgent care visit (Level 3 CPT 99243): $59.50 ED visit/DHS: $1500 Inpatient stay per day/DHS $3000 Asthma controllers and relievers Variable Outcomes:  Healthcare u2liza2on 
  7. 7. CERP aims addressed  •  Aim 4:  Build health services research (HSR)  methods into partnerships to accelerate  design, produc2on and adop2on of evidence‐ based interven2ons.  •  Aim 2:  Build community and academic  infrastructure for sustainable partnered  research 
  8. 8. Time line  Grant funded  IRB approved Study   coordinator   hired  Telephone  Pa2ent  Enrollment  Began  Mail out   Ques2onnaires   12 months  AWer  Ini2al   enrollments  Data analysis  7/25/13 7/17/13 5/6/13  8/5/13  8/5/14 
  9. 9. Added value from CTSI funding  •  Provided salary support of a ¼ FT research  associate who is coordina2ng telephone  interviews and mail out ques2onnaires.  •  Provide sta2s2cal analysis when data is to be  analyzed.  •  Bring to the aaen2on of HUMC/DHS  leadership importance of this area of HSR. 
  10. 10. Data so far…. 
  11. 11. 0  20  40  60  80  100  120  ED visits  Unscheduled  urgent care  Hospitaliza2on  Regular  provider visit  Asthma  specialist visit  # rescue  inhalers  # controller  inhalers  Controller/ reliever ra2o  % paAents  Preliminary data:  Acute care visits, hosp, regular care and asthma controller/reliever  prescrip2ons between HUMC and community HMO pa2ents –Telephone surveys  HUMC (n=28)  Community HMO (n=33) 
  12. 12. 0  20  40  60  80  100  120  ED visits  Unscheduled  urgent care  Hospitaliza2on  Regular provider  visit  Asthma specialist  visit  # rescue inhalers  # controller  inhalers  Controller/reliever  ra2o  Preliminary data:  Acute care visits, hosp, regular care and asthma controller/reliever  prescrip2ons between HUMC and community HMO pa2ents –Telephone surveys  HUMC (n=46)  Community HMO (n=52) 
  13. 13. Plan  #visits  #pa2ents  #frequency  1.  LA CARE ‐ DHS ASSIGNED (SPD)  243  185  1.31  2.  LA CARE ‐ NON‐DHS ASSIGNED (NON‐SPD)  355  314  1.13  3.  MEDI‐CAL  289  232  1.25  4.  SELF‐PAY  235  218  1.08  6.  ORSA  2  2  1.00  7.  OTHER  564  483  1.17  Frequency of ED visits of pediatric asthma paNents 10/2011 to 10/2012 
  14. 14. Preliminary interpreta2ons  •  There is no significant difference between asthma  care provided by HUMC versus community HMO.  •  Community HMO managed asthma2cs have  slightly lower repeat ED visits at HUMC PED for  asthma  •  There is significantly under‐prescrip2on of  asthma controller medica2ons in both HUMC and  community managed asthma children  •  (Boaom line: we all do a terrible job) 
  15. 15. Next steps and products  •  DHS/HUMC‐community asthma provider network for  iden2fying high risk pa2ents, sharing of clinical data  and tracking of pa2ents on a recurring/long term basis;   •     •  DHS/HUMC‐community pediatric asthma disease  management program to shiW expensive acute care to  cost effec2ve long term preventa2ve care;    •  Development of private community managed care  contracts with DHS/HUMC specialty care to reduce  asthma burden and costs to their members. 
  16. 16. Acknowledgements  •  Jumie Lee PNP – HUMC PED  •  Stanley Inkelis MD – HUMC PED  •  Melody Casillas RN – Peds Allergy‐Immunology  •  Johanna Raygoza – LA Biomed 

×