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A tactical approach to writing your
grant proposal
Karol Watson, MD, PhD
UCLA CTSI K to R Workshop
October 29, 2015
4-6 month time-line: 1st month
• Pick a topic you love and get excited to be
creative
– should be natural extension of you...
3-4 months out:
Meet with your Program Official
• Remember that most PO’s love seeing K
awardees get R01s
– relationship e...
Putting Together your Team: think both as
a reviewer and as PI
• Interdisciplinary teams increasingly attractive
• Each te...
Putting Your Team Together
(Continued)
• Think carefully about subcontracts (allow
extra time)
• Balance of seniority leve...
Don’t under-budget:
• Project Director salary
• Ground transportation for staff
• Cell phones and service
• Translations
•...
Writing the Grant
• Approach (Methods) is VERY important
– Begin writing early. Do not wait.
• Remember your audience
– Fe...
Telling your Story:
Preliminary Studies
• Purpose:
– (Findings that support your hypotheses)
– Most important: to show the...
Keys to Success
• Innovation and Creativity is important
– Looking for new solutions to old problems
– How do you create c...
Grant Writing
• Start early
• Seek advice from colleagues
• Start with a good idea
• Talk to your NIH Program Official(s)
...
MOST IMPORTANT SLIDE!
Most common reasons for not receiving
funds:
• Lack of new or original ideas
• Diffuse, superficial ...
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K-to-R Workshop: A Tactical Approach to Writing Your Proposal

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Published on

UCLA CTSI K-to_R Workshop, October 29, 2015

Presenter:
Karol Watson, MD, PhD
Professor of Medicine at UCLA
Co-Director, UCLA Program in Preventive Cardiology
Director, UCLA Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Health Program

Published in: Education
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K-to-R Workshop: A Tactical Approach to Writing Your Proposal

  1. 1. A tactical approach to writing your grant proposal Karol Watson, MD, PhD UCLA CTSI K to R Workshop October 29, 2015
  2. 2. 4-6 month time-line: 1st month • Pick a topic you love and get excited to be creative – should be natural extension of your K work • Draft specific aims • Start to put together scientific team • Map out calendar – meet with your admin team to determine key dates – vacations, ward attending? – set target dates to get drafts to Co-Is
  3. 3. 3-4 months out: Meet with your Program Official • Remember that most PO’s love seeing K awardees get R01s – relationship evolves during your K • Phone vs. email? • Will he/she will read your specific aims? • Suggestions re study section? • Cover letter can mention your PO • Send thank you email and copy of grant
  4. 4. Putting Together your Team: think both as a reviewer and as PI • Interdisciplinary teams increasingly attractive • Each team member needs to be making unique/complimentary contribution • Consider linking with strengths of your institution – Will be attractive to reviewers – Good opportunity to expand your network
  5. 5. Putting Your Team Together (Continued) • Think carefully about subcontracts (allow extra time) • Balance of seniority levels • Choose people you want to work with
  6. 6. Don’t under-budget: • Project Director salary • Ground transportation for staff • Cell phones and service • Translations • Data storage (consider scanning)
  7. 7. Writing the Grant • Approach (Methods) is VERY important – Begin writing early. Do not wait. • Remember your audience – Few MDs – May know nothing about your area of research – Make it easy on the reviewer
  8. 8. Telling your Story: Preliminary Studies • Purpose: – (Findings that support your hypotheses) – Most important: to show the reviewer your team has experience to do the project
  9. 9. Keys to Success • Innovation and Creativity is important – Looking for new solutions to old problems – How do you create creativity? • Calling the Program Officer is a critical element – It is estimated that up to 85% of all successful grant seekers have had contact with the program officer
  10. 10. Grant Writing • Start early • Seek advice from colleagues • Start with a good idea • Talk to your NIH Program Official(s) • Use the NIH webpage (www.nih.gov) • Remember review criteria • Follow instructions carefully
  11. 11. MOST IMPORTANT SLIDE! Most common reasons for not receiving funds: • Lack of new or original ideas • Diffuse, superficial or unfocused research plan • Lack of knowledge of published relevant work • Lack of experience in the essential methodology • Uncertainty concerning the future directions • Questionable reasoning in experimental approach • Absence of acceptable scientific rationale • Unrealistically large amount of work • Lack of sufficient experimental detail • Uncritical approach

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