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Encapsulating knowledge for intelligent interactoin object selection

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Paper presented at ACM CHI'93 (conference on Human Aspects in Computing Systems). This paper introduces the notion of Abstract Interaction Objects, which is an abstraction of Concrete Interaction Objects found in various toolkits. The implementation was done is OSF/Motif on DEC stations.

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Encapsulating knowledge for intelligent interactoin object selection

  1. 1. Encapsulating Knowledge for Intelligent Automatic Interaction Objects Selection Jean Vanderdonckt, François Bodart University of Namur, Belgium jean.vanderdonckt@gmail.com in Proceedings of ACM Conference on Human Aspects in Computing Systems InterCHI'93 (Amsterdam, 24-29 April 1993), S. Ashlund, K. Mullet, A. Henderson, E. Hollnagel, T. White (Eds.), Addison Wesley, Reading (Massachusetts), pp. 424-429.
  2. 2. Interaction Objects Selection Introduction 1. Is environment independent 2. Is included in an automatic generator 3. Involves application semantic 4. Requires a dialog model
  3. 3. Interaction Objects Selection (2) 5. Requires a user model 6. Considers screen space 7. Uses explicit rules 8. Groups related objects
  4. 4. Selection Requirements 1. Is environment independent 2. Is included in an automatic generator 3. Involves application semantic 4. Requires a dialog model
  5. 5. Abstract Interaction Objects Different presentations Same behaviours Abstract (AIO) versus Concrete (CIO) – Abstract Interaction Objects are platform-independent – Concrete Interaction Objects are platform-specific Taxonomy of AIOs 6 sets : action, scrolling, static, control, dialog and feedback
  6. 6. Abstract Interaction Objects (2) Generic name, definition Nature Type Aggregation, inheritance Operations = (causes, effects) Abstract attributes, events and primitives – PushButton_TriggeredFunctionName – PushButton_OnSelection – PushButton_TriggerFunction
  7. 7. Selection Requirements 1. Is environment independent 2. Is included in an automatic generator 3. Involves application semantic 4. Requires a dialog model
  8. 8. TRIDENT Approach Overview Specification editor ERA, FCG databases AIO selector Selection rules AIO specifications AIO to CIO mapper CIO specifications CIO placer UIL objects Presentation editor
  9. 9. Specification Editor
  10. 10. Abstract Interaction Object Selector
  11. 11. UIDL Specifications
  12. 12. Selection Requirements 1. Is environment independent 2. Is included in an automatic generator 3. Involves application semantic 4. Requires a dialog model
  13. 13. Application Data Modelization Domain Data types Values to choose Default value Principal values Secundary values
  14. 14. Application Data Modelization (2) Granularity: low-medium-high Known values: domain values Ordered list: yes/no Expandable list: yes/no Continuous range: yes/no
  15. 15. Selection Requirements 5. Requires a user model 6. Considers screen space 7. Uses explicit rules 8. Groups related objects
  16. 16. Application Data Modelization (3) User level : Beginner Novice Intermediate Expert Master Selection preference Constrained screen space
  17. 17. Selection Requirements 5. Requires a user model 6. Considers screen space 7. Uses explicit rules 8. Groups related objects
  18. 18. Selection Rules Data input, data display 8 data types : hour, date, logical, integer, numeric, real, alphabetic, alphanumeric Simple AIO for elementary data Composite AIO for grouped data (list, group, array)
  19. 19. Selection Rules (example) Integer input data, known domain, Nvc > 1 Nsv Exp Npv AIO = 0 no [2,3] Npv check boxes [4,7] Npv check boxes+group box [8,Tm] List box [Tm+1,2Tm] Scrolling list box > 2Tm Scrolling drop-down list box = 0 yes Combination box > 0 List box
  20. 20. Decision Trees 2 trees for input/display Data type on first node One simple condition by node Branching nodes Conclusion nodes
  21. 21. Decision Tree (example) Nsv=0 Exp=no 2ŠNpvŠ3 Npv check boxes Nsv>0 Exp=yes 4ŠNpvŠ7 Npv>2Tm Npv check boxes+group box 8ŠNpvŠTm List box Tm+1ŠNpvŠ2Tm Scrolling list box Combination box Scrolling drop-down list box List box
  22. 22. Decision Tree : Conclusion Visibility Easy backtracking Easy explanation Fast selection Modifiability Refinement Rule redundancy Excessive size Predefined order Pro Contra

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