New ways of looking at graduate employability  & the new labour market: a view from the UK Deakin University 2011 Jeanne B...
05/20/11 Jeanne Booth
All subjects:  graduates from 2009 274,380 graduates 57.6% in employment 8.9% unemployed 8% working & studying 8.1% studyi...
Types of work for those in employment 88540  Female 58710  Male 147250  Total
UK History Graduates from 2009 History teaching with passion 6 months following graduation 47% in employment 7.8%  working...
Employment 23.0%  Retail, Catering, Waiting  and bar staff 17.9%  Other Occupations 15.0%  Other clerical and secretarial ...
Richard Lambert, CBI <ul><li>‘ It is impossible to predict what disciplines will be of most economic and social value in a...
BIS Statistical Release URN 10/92 13 October 2010 UK private enterprises by number of employees Enterprises Employment/100...
Making a living in a complex constantly changing world
To thrive in complexity requires ability <ul><li>To relate to, make & maintain relationships with people at all levels, in...
Top 10 reasons for going to university Jeanne Booth
If students are enjoying what they are doing they are more likely to: <ul><li>persevere </li></ul><ul><li>seek out opportu...
Changing   attitudes to work/life <ul><li>Want good work </li></ul><ul><li>Makes a difference </li></ul><ul><li>Shared val...
What do graduates need to know? <ul><li>In-depth knowledge of a favourite subject </li></ul><ul><li>How to apply knowledge...
What can you do to enhance your graduates’ ability to: <ul><li>Relate to, make & maintain relationships with people at all...
Some possible strategies  <ul><li>Projects that encourage multidisciplinary working such as ‘creative’ students working al...
Skills for the  21st century:  creative and cultural sectors Jeanne Booth
Jeanne Booth
Identified skills requirements <ul><li>1. Leadership and management </li></ul><ul><li>2. Self-management & professionalism...
Challenges <ul><li>•  Access to information, advice & guidance </li></ul><ul><li>•  Up to date market & industry intellige...
Regional work programme <ul><li>1. Support guidance provided by careers </li></ul><ul><li>advisers, teachers, parents, wit...
SALAMI Shared Aggregation of Labour Market Information <ul><li>To use links and mash-up information to create accessible, ...
 
Who uses LMI? <ul><li>Policy-makers </li></ul><ul><li>Implementers </li></ul><ul><li>Education funders </li></ul><ul><li>P...
Opportunities in a new landscape <ul><li>-  More data being opened up </li></ul><ul><li>- Government open data initiative ...
LMI and Open Data | Demonstration Roger Clarke Stuart Wood
Data Sources
How the demo works… User search within SALAMI by occupation and area. Occupation titles mapped from Connexions Direct Jobs...
Live Demonstration http://salami.samson-portal.org
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New perspectives on employability & the graduate labour market

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Presentation to Deakin University Arts and Humanities Faculty(April 2011) on new ways of looking at employability and the graduate labour market. Also overview of regional skills development programme for creative and cultural sectors and SALAMI Labour Market Intelligence Data project.

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  • Good morning and thank you – particularly coming at the start of your Easter holiday when hopefully not working is on your mind! Over next couple of hours going to give you something of a view on the graduate labour market from the UK – a view perhaps not the view and tell you something about a couple of projects I’m involved in – but I am going to try and cram quite a lot in so it may feel like I’m switching from one thing to another but hopefully – like a variety act – you’’ll take something away from the parts that resonate most with you. If nothing else I hope to give you some things to think about, to discuss &amp; go on discussing. How many? Interruptions fine but if it feels like its taking a long time might ask you to hold on &amp; we’ll return to it. First off – I’d like you to think about yourself! This bit shouldn’t be too hard – unless you’ve got kids in which case you might be out of practice. I’d like you to think of yourself doing your undergraduate degree – so whatever age you were 20’s or later. Just think about the person you were then. How many of you knew then you wanted to be here now – well maybe not actually here – but doing the job you are doing now?
  • And what do you know about what your graduates do when they leave you? Hands up? How do you know? I’m going to show you labour market data from the UK – I haven’t got Asustralian stuff – but everything I show you here, you can get from your careers people here – they’ve done some really neat stuff with your labour market data. Now things are pretty difficult in the UK right now – some figures suggest around 20% of our 16-24 year olds are out of work. You are more likely to find a job if you are a graduate but we have expanded the system so you are competing with a lot of other graduates and with fees - /key information set/ students and particularly parents examining costs or the ROI for a university degree. Can colleges or universities really be sued if graduates cannot find jobs? Actually I don’t know the answer to that – I don’t know whether this student in the US successfully managed to sue her college – I do know a UK graduate recently tried to sue a university department for awarding him a 2.2. instead of a 2.1. which, he said disadvantaged him with graduate employers arguing that he hadn’t received sufficent support from his tutors to enable him to achieve a 2.1. This is crazy stuff isn’t it – but this plea of ‘where are the jobs’ is one of the signs of the new graduate labour market that has been emerging certainly in the UK but I suspect elsewhere too. Globalisation &amp; new technologies have been dramatically changing how work is organised, its nature and the pattern individual careers will take. Traditional large companies have become – leaner, flatter, using more p/time staff and outsourcing and using flexible contracts - using people on a plug and play basis. Recently in the UK we’re also seeing large scale redundancies particularly in public sector. Traditional recruitment into graduate training programmes has declined significantly. The Association of Graduate Recruiters which represents 750 of mostly large corporations including 80 of FTSE 100 &amp; most of large public sector recruiters including health, education &amp; local government, now have vacancies for less than 10% of the annual graduating force – and two-thirds of those vacancies are appropriate for graduates of any discipline. Lets have a look at some of the numbers from the UK &amp; you might like to think about what you know about your own numbers.
  • These are destinations 6 months following graduation in the UK – your own destinations are done 4 months after graduation.
  • These are the types of work – You can see from this that they are by no means all what you would consider to be graduate level jobs. Now remember these figures are at 6 months following graduation – after 3.5 years later 80% of graduates over all have found their way into graduate jobs – altho not on permanent contracts – and some do not do as well – for instance arts graduates 70% Now you might think the answer here is that if students are so bothered about the job situation they should choose the programmes that lead more readily into jobs – but certainly in the UK that’s becoming increasingly difficult to do –two-thirds job vacancies suitable for any discipline. Time lag makes it difficult to make reliable predictions on job prospects. In 2000 IT graduates were the most sought &amp; some of highest paid - 18 months later they recorded one of the highest unemployment rates of any discipline and their salary level had significantly fallen. In the last 10 years students studying courses such as quantity surveying, civil engineering, construction management and estate &amp; building surveying have been some of the most sought after graduates by employers - 3 or 4 job offers. Today most are finding it difficult to find a graduate job related to their studies. This could not have been predicted 2 years ago. Again 3 years ago teaching, particularly secondary, was not a popular choice for graduates &amp; male graduates specifically. Today applications to teaching high as ever - safe and secure job in an graduate unpredictable job market. More generally the demand in the economy is at technician level rather then professional level. Entry into graduate level jobs is increasingly through project work or undertaking a temporary task rather than responding to an advertisement for a permanent graduate job. This is particularly pertinent to the ‘creative’ type disciplines where there are not clear routes into the graduate labour market. Often the initial way forward is through freelancing and networking and combining your graduate work with paid non graduate jobs. Not just at start of career – Law – we were Oxford – advise kids to go into law – actually most law undergraduates now don’t go into law related jobs. Impact of the Legal Services Act 2007 non lawyers can run a law firm and you have deregulation of legal activities which means a paralegal can do a task rather than a solicitor. India has set up English conveyancing. Neurosurgeons, University historians.
  • Here’s the figures for Historians - These are the destinations of graduates 6 months after graduation. Just over 47% were in full-time work, 14% were studying for a higher degree and 3.5% for a PGCE.
  • This is how that 47% in work divides into types of work. Nearly a quarter in retail &amp; bar work, 15% in clerical &amp; secretarial and 18% in other occupations which might included personal trainer. Australian or the Deakin figures not dissimilar and Arts areas and some others at Deakin are performing a little below the national average. Talk to the careers people
  • Our reaction when we are faced with the DLHE stats &amp; competition for fewer jobs is to work on employability skills to ensure graduates can compete with others - so we try and find out what it is employers want &amp; ensure we incorporate those things into programmes and we speak the ‘required’ language. This is important and valuable work but it doesn’t mean there are any more jobs. If you’ve got 40/80 applicants for a jobs having the skills that employer wants still isn’t going to get you the job. And actually employers know little more about their future needs than anyone else does. And what if there are not only fewer jobs but fewer employers ?
  • This shows size of UK private enterprise – nearly three-quarters don’t employ anyone except themselves &amp; this has been rising 1-2% year for the last few years. Actually 99% of UK companies employ less than 50 people, they account for employment of nearly half the workforce And actually you’ve got higher proportions of higher qualified people in those smaller – zero-employee companies. These sorts of companies dont run graduate training schemes and buy in products and services as they need them – using people on a plug and play basis - making a living in this kind of world and continuing to do so is very different from applying for a vacancy with a large graduate training scheme
  • In fact this is increasingly what it is like trying to make a living in a constantly changing, unpredictable world. - Lewis Caroll probably describes it best ... ‘ Alice was bewildered by what she confronted: a croquet ground that was all ridges and furrows: the balls were live hedgehogs; the mallets were live flamingos: and the soldiers formed the hoops by bending over, touching the ground. Alice’s first difficulty was in handling her flamingo.’ “ She succeeded in getting its body tucked away, comfortably enough, under her arm...but generally, just as she got its neck nicely straightened out, and was going to give the hedgehog a blow with its head, it would twist itself around...and when it got its head down, and was going to begin again, it was very provoking to find that the hedgehog had unrolled itself, and was in the act of crawling away.” Alice’s problems didn’t stop there though. She found that wherever she wanted to send the hedgehog, a ridge or furrow was in the way. And the soldiers kept on standing up and walking away. “ Alice came to the conclusion that it was a very difficult game indeed.” This is the world your graduates are trying to make a living in, and, like Alice, they are on their own. It is increasingly unlikely they will be taken under the wing of a paternal employer and pursue a linear pathway, even if they start out like that .
  • Or to bring the imagery more up to date – here’s the moving staircase from Hogwarts – this is the kind of career your graduates are looking at – no sooner have they started up the stairway than it’ll move! There are virtually no rules or predictable ways of making a living anymore – or not ones that will last a lifetime. Continuing to make a living requires interaction with all kinds of people and agents, that all interact with each other and constantly adapt to the conditions around them. The outcomes are complex and unpredictable – with any luck creativity, adaptability and innovation will emerge but they are by no means the only possible outcomes – and the only influence Alice can have is in the way she holds herself and the position she takes in her interactions with others. So whilst employability skills are important and we need to pay attention to what employers may say they want, I would argue we need to even more attention to what will prepare graduates to thrive in these conditions
  • To thrive, these are some of the key things researchers say will be needed - On the left-hand side are some of the attributes Lee Harvey, UCE, suggests are needed. On the right is the outcomes of recent research conducted by the Warwick Institute for Employment Research into changing patterns of working, learning and career development across Europe. They argued that we’ve focussed a lot on employer needs for the knowledge economy and policymakers have highlighted the need for individuals to develop additional skills, knowledge and understanding – but what individuals are going to need to continue to make a living is the ability to recontextualise their skills, knowledge and understanding to transfer them between different settings. They talk about the concept of flexicurity – being able to flex what can do in different ways to create work someone will pay for is the only security you have. Now at this point you may feel a little despairing because you may think that in addition to all the employability skills you’ve been thinking about you’ve got to think about these things – and after all your job is teaching your discipline. But maybe – and we can discuss this – as with everything there is both a challenge and an opportunity. If it is not possible to predict where the jobs are going to be – and there are no guarrantees anywhere - what would you advise your children to do?
  • Perhaps do what students do anyway and It’s worth taking a closer look at the Soxedo-Times Higher Education University Lifestyle survey - reported 18/3/2010 It sheds light on why people choose to come to university The overwhelming majority in the survey of 2000 full-time undergraduates said they came to improve job opportunities – but job opportunities aren’t just about money – 58% said they came to improve salary prospects and a fraction less 57% said they came to improve their knowledge in an area that interested them. The DEMOS survey &amp; report on the class of 2010 shows graduates view university much more as preparation for life than preparation for work and the language they use is far removed from dominant skills and employability language.
  • Sounds like common sense but if you are enjoying what you are doing, you are more likely to persevere – and that’s really important when you consider nearly a third in the survey said they had considered dropping out. There is a growing body of research on positive psychology demonstrating that if you are feeling enjoyment, enthusiasm, interest, you go on seeking out ways to discover more &amp; create opportunities to do so. I’m not sure we need research to tell us that – most of us will have felt it - but the argument goes that in addition to immediate benefits, positive experiences help build enduring physical, intellectual and psychological resources – perhaps those that students need to be equipped with to navigate the volatile employment situation and find ways to go on making a good living beyond the first job, to be happy and flourish as lifelong learners.
  • In the Demos survey and other research into the kinds of companies graduates want to work for suggest they want good work, doing stuff they enjoy and care about and makes a difference. More are creating work for themselves and will have to.
  • But what does this mean for teaching strategies – what do graduates need to know and develop from their HE experience to improve their prospects and be able to flourish and make a good living? In a report for the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, the New Economics Foundation came up with the following 7 things they thought graduates should know . Firstly advanced knowledge and understanding of a favourite subject - they stressed learning for its own sake and for the benefits an individual gets from getting caught up – getting curious and engaging in discovery – in an informed, reflective fashion How to apply knowledge – understanding how to make sense of and how to use the knowledge they’ve gained – how to apply it in different contexts – whether that is to economic activity or other challenges in everyday life. Understanding what makes a good life – about what really matters and affects well-being – going beyond the economic factors and understanding the importance of dimensions such as relationships with others and the communities they will live in. How others think – developing students knowledge about the underlying assumptions and approaches of different academic disciplines – and building on students capabilities to reflect on how their own ways of thinking are affected by and impact upon others. How change happens – graduates, they argue, have huge potential as change agents but their potential will be restricted unless they understand how change happens&gt; whilst many fields of academic enquiry include a ‘change’ component in relation to their discipline, these can overlook the importance of personal relationships; contextual factors and promoting mutual understanding as a strategy for change. Dynamics of power and influence – understanding distribution and impact of inequalities critical to bringing about change in their own lives &amp; those of others. Global interdependence – developing ethically responsible global citizens and graduates who can be adaptive to unforseen challenges – climate change, population &amp; growing economic &amp; social inequalities. Walker and Nixon (Reclaiming universities from a runaway world)referred to need for HE to create a ‘thick morality’ grounded in notions of common good rather than a ‘thin morality’ based on competitive individualism &amp; heirachical divisions.
  • To thrive, these are some of the key things researchers say will be needed - On the left-hand side are some of the attributes Lee Harvey, UCE, suggests are needed. On the right is the outcomes of recent research conducted by the Warwick Institute for Employment Research into changing patterns of working, learning and career development across Europe. They argued that we’ve focussed a lot on employer needs for the knowledge economy and policymakers have highlighted the need for individuals to develop additional skills, knowledge and understanding – but what individuals are going to need to continue to make a living is the ability to recontextualise their skills, knowledge and understanding to transfer them between different settings. They talk about the concept of flexicurity – being able to flex what can do in different ways to create work someone will pay for is the only security you have. Now at this point you may feel a little despairing because you may think that in addition to all the employability skills you’ve been thinking about you’ve got to think about these things – and after all your job is teaching your discipline. But maybe – and we can discuss this – as with everything there is both a challenge and an opportunity. If it is not possible to predict where the jobs are going to be – and there are no guarrantees anywhere - what would you advise your children to do?
  • Use this slide if they don’t come up with anything! Staff at Nottingham Trent University came up with these at a recent T&amp;L day
  • This report commissioned by East Midlands Regional Development Agency 3 years ago brought together employability and small business issues for graduates of creative disciplines. Applied Arts people are often the most obvious group of graduates people think of as freelancers, sole traders and portfolio workers – although they are by no means the only group and much of what can be applied to creative arts graduates can equally be applied to graduates from other disciplines. Education for instance is one of the biggest sectors of freelancers. However this report was driven by the work of industry-led Sector Skills Councils who are representatives of employers and businesses and was the result of an imperative to reduce duplication of skills and learning provision and develop a regional skills strategy for those involved in Audio-Visual, TV, radio, film and video, photography, advertising , music, computer software including games &amp; digital, web, mobile etc, performamce, theatre, circus, puppetry, books and press, publishing, literature, printing, visual art and design, fine arts and crafts, art and antiques, architecture, design, designer fashion Cultural – architecture &amp; design, audio-visual, heritage &amp; the historic environment, libraries and literature, museums, galleries, &amp; archives, sport, tourism, visual &amp; performing arts
  • These are all the bodies and skills reports that were brought together in this report to try to bring together some common threads that could inform regional skills strategy At that time it was estimated that businesses working in these areas made up 16% of all businesses in the region, a third were freelancers so people working on their own &amp; the overwhelming majority employed less than 10 people. The proprtion of businesses were growing but national work also suggested that thriving creative &amp; cultural sectors impacted upon the productivity of other sectors – so creative industries were and are seen as a driver for innovation and growth but it was argued that the mechanisms which includes people skills could be developed to enable them to be more effective at being so. Furthermore it was argued that a thriving cultural life helped to attract and retain skilled investors, graduates and young people as well as, particularly the participative arts could be used as a powerful force for social stability and cohesion.
  • The reports placed the greatest emphasis on individuals being able to grow successful businesses and organisations and transfer their skills into other contexts and markets. l/ship &amp; m/ment – particularly the capacities to lead new approaches to dynamic environments &amp; manage collaborative projects involving multi-disciplinary groups of people working for themselves (or for different employers) in different locations Self/management/professionalism – being able to sell ones own skills in different environments &amp; secure a living – includes managing a portfolio, self-directed learning &amp; the ‘fit’ between ones skills and passions and those someone will pay for Business skills/acumen – includes the ability to leverage creative ideas to offer solutions in a broad range of business, community &amp;b social enterprise situations; to operate globally &amp; understand the fundamentals of running a successful business. Collaboration &amp; team-working – ability to work collaboratively with others, across sectors, in multi-disciplinary teams, awareness of ones own worth &amp; ability to negotiate share of intellectual ownership Selling, marketing &amp; PR skills – being able to influence &amp; build customer relationships in a range of environments, including global, mass &amp; niche markets Information Technology – being able to use appropropriate technology &amp; operate in the new environments brought about by technological advances &amp; globalisation Technical skills , generic &amp; specific – includes IPR, health &amp; safety issues etc
  • IAG – careers advisers, tutors &amp; others often had little experience themselves of working in new ways – working on old models with linear pathways. Would argue oversupply of some graduates – design, computer games good example &amp; couldn’t perceive of how those skills could be applied in other ways. LMI – we are still working to try to improve these &amp; find ways of highlighting emerging opportunities – currently working with Warwick on European bid – old SOC/SIC codes – old ways of describing work – need new data for new work Need to reform qualifications to include more relevant work experience L/ship &amp; m/ment – independent creatives can be reluctant to become leaders &amp; work on the business rather than in it – this reflects a particular emphasis and economic philosophy which focuses on growing businesses and can be dismissive of ‘lifestyle businesses’ – but it is these that are growing in proportion. Finding ways to encourage cpd for large numbers of freelancers – universities &amp; colleges cant cope with them - &amp; they want to learn through networking, mentoring, shadowing, placements, secondments &amp; apprenticeships. Tackling diversity – many of creative areas dominated by white middle class who know, or whose parents know how to play the game, get the best work experience, leverage social capital etc. Not only a social justice challenge but critical to fuelling creativity &amp; developing new markets.
  • Dynamic real-time collection of data via partnership with on-line business services used by freelancers &amp; others 4. Measures to encourage interaction with other disciplines – maybe not such an issue in Australia Access to small pots of funding, expertise, work placements at different levels. Awards for demonstrating cross-sector working and leveraging ideas in different contexts. 5. Test modes of learning and pedagogies approprate for owner-managers in different environments in order to develop leaders for new multi-dimensional markets. T-shaped people – those that may have a deep knowledge of one area and a broad interest and sympathy with many others – so they can literally bridge sectors &amp;b act as intermediaries, brokers or interpreters Leaders who manage multi-disciplinary teams.
  • Introduce Stuart. Developer - UoN
  • Data Sources How we have been using the data accessible over the web Explain each thing and how I have been accessing it Want to show the sources out there and how you can mix em up to add value…
  • Explain the scenario – demo to consume many data sources Theoretical situation where a careers advisor is showing a prospective student available LMI data based on occupation and area
  • Explain a bit about the demo – All east mids data
  • New perspectives on employability & the graduate labour market

    1. 1. New ways of looking at graduate employability & the new labour market: a view from the UK Deakin University 2011 Jeanne Booth
    2. 2. 05/20/11 Jeanne Booth
    3. 3. All subjects: graduates from 2009 274,380 graduates 57.6% in employment 8.9% unemployed 8% working & studying 8.1% studying for higher degree 4.6% other study or training 2.4% teaching qualification 3.8% not available 4.6% other 1.6% overseas employment
    4. 4. Types of work for those in employment 88540 Female 58710 Male 147250 Total
    5. 5. UK History Graduates from 2009 History teaching with passion 6 months following graduation 47% in employment 7.8% working + studying 14.4% studying for higher degree PGCE 3.5% 4.7% not available 9.2% unemployed
    6. 6. Employment 23.0% Retail, Catering, Waiting and bar staff 17.9% Other Occupations 15.0% Other clerical and secretarial occupations 8.3% Business & Financial Professionals and Associate Professionals 10.3% Commercial, Industrial and Public Sector Managers 6.5% Marketing, Sales & Advertising Professionals Jeanne Booth 4.0% education professionals
    7. 7. Richard Lambert, CBI <ul><li>‘ It is impossible to predict what disciplines will be of most economic and social value in a rapidly changing world. Most of the big breakthroughs in the development of products and services these days come from collaboration among different disciplines.’ </li></ul><ul><li>Richard Lambert, former Director General of the Confederation of British Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Nov.12 th 2010 </li></ul>Jeanne Booth
    8. 8. BIS Statistical Release URN 10/92 13 October 2010 UK private enterprises by number of employees Enterprises Employment/1000 All enterprises 4,834,045 22,819 With no employees 74.7% 17% 1-9 employees 21% 16.7% 10-49 employees 3.4% 14% 50-249 employees 0.5% 11.5% Over 250 employees 0.1% 40%
    9. 9. Making a living in a complex constantly changing world
    10. 10.
    11. 11. To thrive in complexity requires ability <ul><li>To relate to, make & maintain relationships with people at all levels, inside & outside organisations </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate & work in teams, more than one team at once, & adjust roles in ever-shifting situation </li></ul><ul><li>Willingness to learn continually, take risks, lead & deal with change & help others to do so </li></ul><ul><li>Self-management, self-confidence & self-promotion </li></ul><ul><li>Harvey, New Realities, 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to recontextualise their skills, knowledge and understanding according to the requirements of different settings & develop a frame of mind whereby they continually look to improve </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Warwick Institute for Employment Research, Changing Patterns of Work, 2010 </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Top 10 reasons for going to university Jeanne Booth
    13. 13. If students are enjoying what they are doing they are more likely to: <ul><li>persevere </li></ul><ul><li>seek out opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>become more creative & flexible </li></ul><ul><li>(‘flow’, Csikszentmihalyi,1990, ‘broaden-and-build’, Frederickson, 2001) </li></ul>
    14. 14. Changing attitudes to work/life <ul><li>Want good work </li></ul><ul><li>Makes a difference </li></ul><ul><li>Shared values </li></ul><ul><li>Flat structures </li></ul><ul><li>Self-development </li></ul><ul><li>Ethical & sustainable operation </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing learning & working in teams </li></ul><ul><li>Creating work for themselves </li></ul><ul><li>46% increase in graduates starting own business </li></ul><ul><li>More from arts and humanities </li></ul><ul><li>Third of those starting businesses start social enterprises </li></ul>Jeanne Booth
    15. 15. What do graduates need to know? <ul><li>In-depth knowledge of a favourite subject </li></ul><ul><li>How to apply knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>What makes a good life </li></ul><ul><li>How others think </li></ul><ul><li>How change happens </li></ul><ul><li>The dynamics of power and influence </li></ul><ul><li>Global interdependence </li></ul><ul><li>New Economics Foundation for Quality Assurance Agency </li></ul>
    16. 16. What can you do to enhance your graduates’ ability to: <ul><li>Relate to, make & maintain relationships with people at all levels, inside & outside organisations </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate & work in teams, more than one team at once, & adjust roles in ever-shifting situation </li></ul><ul><li>Recontextualise their skills, knowledge and understanding according to the requirements of different settings </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a frame of mind whereby they continually look to improve, take risks, lead & deal with change & help others to do so </li></ul><ul><li>Self-manage, gain self-confidence & self-promote effectively </li></ul><ul><li>Learn to manage the complexities, uncertainties and dynamic aspects of modern work? </li></ul>
    17. 17. Some possible strategies <ul><li>Projects that encourage multidisciplinary working such as ‘creative’ students working alongside ‘science & technology’ students. </li></ul><ul><li>Mini work based learning projects where students/graduates are ‘problem solving’ for smaller companies – may also grow new jobs. </li></ul><ul><li>Alumni mentoring students/graduates and providing models for managing uncertainty. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Skills for the 21st century: creative and cultural sectors Jeanne Booth
    19. 19. Jeanne Booth
    20. 20. Identified skills requirements <ul><li>1. Leadership and management </li></ul><ul><li>2. Self-management & professionalism </li></ul><ul><li>3. Business acumen & enterprise skills </li></ul><ul><li>4. Collaboration, negotiation & teamworking </li></ul><ul><li>5. Selling, marketing & PR skills </li></ul><ul><li>6. Information & digital technology </li></ul><ul><li>7. Technical skills – generic & specific </li></ul>Jeanne Booth
    21. 21. Challenges <ul><li>• Access to information, advice & guidance </li></ul><ul><li>• Up to date market & industry intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>• Reforming qualifications to prepare people for </li></ul><ul><li>work – need more relevant work experience </li></ul><ul><li>• Developing leaders & managers </li></ul><ul><li>• Encouraging business, enterprise, innovation & </li></ul><ul><li>growth </li></ul><ul><li>• Facilitating continuing professional development </li></ul><ul><li>• Addressing diversity </li></ul>Jeanne Booth
    22. 22. Regional work programme <ul><li>1. Support guidance provided by careers </li></ul><ul><li>advisers, teachers, parents, with dynamic online information </li></ul><ul><li>2. Design tracking systems to capture emerging trends & disseminate industry/market intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>3. Develop learning & work experience scheme </li></ul><ul><li>4. Support development of business & enterprise </li></ul><ul><li>skills in cross-sector environments </li></ul><ul><li>5. Pilot programme to develop inspirational </li></ul><ul><li>leaders </li></ul><ul><li>6. Address diversity </li></ul>Jeanne Booth
    23. 23. SALAMI Shared Aggregation of Labour Market Information <ul><li>To use links and mash-up information to create accessible, real-time and personalised Information to help people and organisations plan choices about careers and courses. </li></ul>
    24. 25. Who uses LMI? <ul><li>Policy-makers </li></ul><ul><li>Implementers </li></ul><ul><li>Education funders </li></ul><ul><li>Providers </li></ul><ul><li>Designers of curricula and learning infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers & strategic management </li></ul><ul><li>Learners & potential learners </li></ul><ul><li>Job-seekers </li></ul><ul><li>Careers advisers </li></ul><ul><li>Parents </li></ul><ul><li>Employers </li></ul>
    25. 26. Opportunities in a new landscape <ul><li>- More data being opened up </li></ul><ul><li>- Government open data initiative </li></ul><ul><li>- Open standards, back-end services </li></ul><ul><li>Lightweight and mobile applications </li></ul><ul><li>Location aware devices </li></ul><ul><li>- APIs for direct access to data – system to system </li></ul><ul><li>Ubiquitous internet usage </li></ul><ul><li>Smart phones, GPS </li></ul><ul><li>Linked data </li></ul>
    26. 27. LMI and Open Data | Demonstration Roger Clarke Stuart Wood
    27. 28. Data Sources
    28. 29. How the demo works… User search within SALAMI by occupation and area. Occupation titles mapped from Connexions Direct Jobs4U DB through to NOMIS SOC. Location data from NOMIS Local Authorities User Search NOMIS Query Google Graphs YFEM Query Read XCRI Query DBPedia Query the NOMIS API extracting LMI information based on Occupation & Area Send the NOMIS Data through Google Visualisation API – to make it dance and look pretty… Send occupation and area query to YFEM web service to extract course related info <provider> <identifier> 10006494 </identifier> <title> Loughborough College </title> <url> http://www.loucoll.ac.uk </url> <address> Radmoor Road </address> <address> Loughborough </address> <address> Leicestershire </address> <street> Radmoor Road </street> <town> Loughborough </town> <postcode> LE11 3BT </postcode> <phone> 01509 215 831 </phone> <fax> 01509 215 831 </fax> <email> [email_address] </email> <course>…</course> </provider> Read the XCRI Data returned by YFEM Query DBPedia for Institution Data Google Maps Plot Institutions based on proximity to area using Google Maps Video Query Police Stats Send Occupation Query to iCould API to return relevent videos Location data sent to Police.UK API to return crime statistics
    29. 30. Live Demonstration http://salami.samson-portal.org

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