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Lean UX principles

Why you should apply Lean UX principles as a product development team.

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Lean UX principles

  1. 1. Lean UX principles 1 Tristan Libersat - September 16 2015
  2. 2. Foundations 2
  3. 3. It’s all about… IMPROVING USER EXPERIENCE 3
  4. 4. Lean UX is a combination of DESIGN THINK AGILE LEAN START-UP 4
  5. 5. Principles 5
  6. 6. Cross functional, small, dedicated, colocated teams • Cross-functional squads • High level of collaboration • Squads of 10 people maximum • Focused on 1 project at once • Seated together 6
  7. 7. Progress = outcomes, not output ✖ We will create a single sign-on feature ✓ We want to increase the number of new sign- ups to our service The objective is to solve one problem, not implement a feature 7
  8. 8. • The ONLY objective is to solve one problem, not implement a feature • Anything else is a waste of time Problem-Focused Teams Removing waste 8
  9. 9. • The faster we ship, the most we can learn • Involve the customer • Research, experiment… Small Batch Size Continuous Discovery 9
  10. 10. GOOB: The New User-Centricity • Get Out Of the Building, meet people • Don’t decide things in an office room 10
  11. 11. Shared Understanding • Collective knowledge is the key • Rockstars, Gurus, and Ninjas break the team work • Expose the work & progress to everyone • Use whiteboards 11
  12. 12. • If an idea is worth taking a risk, do it, don’t try to debate on assumptions • Don’t scale too quick, make sure it’s the right thing to do first Making over Analysis but Learning over Growth 12
  13. 13. Permission to Fail • Most of the ideas will fail, but that’s OK, that’s what we try to learn 13
  14. 14. Getting out of the Deliverables Business NO SPECS (or just the minimum) Don’t care about specs, the outcomes are more valuable 14
  15. 15. Process 15
  16. 16. Declare Assumptions Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 16
  17. 17. Problem Statement • Who: Team exercise + external if necessary (content managers, support team) • Preparation: • How the product is currently used? • Why customer are using it this way? • Previous attempts to fix the issue, successes & failures • How solving this would affect the company’s perf? • How competitors are tackling the same issue? Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 17
  18. 18. • Define the problem statement: • [Our service/product] was designed to achieve [these goals]. We have observed that the product/service isn’t meeting [these goals], which is causing [this adverse effect] to our business. How might we improve it so that our customers are more successful based on [these measurable criteria]? Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research Problem Statement 18
  19. 19. Declare the Assumptions Business assumptions: • What need(s)? • How can we solve them? • Who are/will be the users? • What is the #1 value the users want from my service/ product? • Other benefits? • How will I acquire the customers? • How will I make money? • Who will the main competitors be for this? • How will we beat them? • What is the biggest project risk? • How can we solve it? • What other assumptions do we have that, if proven false, will cause our business/project to fail? User assumptions: • Who is the user? • Where does our product fit in his life? • What problems does our product solve? • When and how is our product used? • What features are important? • How should our product look and behave? Technical assumptions: • What devices are impacted? • What constraints could block us from delivering the product? • What dependancies could be required for the product? Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 19
  20. 20. Prioritize the Assumptions Known Unknown Low risk High risk Test those ones first Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 20
  21. 21. Define the Hypothesis • Define how to test the assumption 
 => outcomes / KPIs • And maybe breakdown them if necessary Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 21
  22. 22. Define the Personas Sketch & name Behavioral demographic information Pain points & needs Potential solutions Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 22
  23. 23. 1. Problem definition and constraints (15-45min, together): make sure everyone knows the assumptions, hypothesis, personas 2. Individual idea generation (10min, individual): quickly sketch 6 solutions based on personas / problems / hypothesis… 3. Presentation and critique (3min each, together) 4. Iterate and refine (5-10min, individual): refine the work into 1 final idea 5. Team generation idea (45min, together): converge to the idea that has the biggest chance of success (according to the team) Use a style guide Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research Collaborative Design - Design Studio 23
  24. 24. Finally, list the Features We will for in order to achieve [create this feature] [this persona] [this outcome]. Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 24
  25. 25. Create an Minimum Viable Product Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 26
  26. 26. Try to learn something “The MVP is the minimum features that are required to learn what customers want.” - Eric Ries Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 27
  27. 27. • It doesn’t necessarily have to involve any development, it can be a landing page promoting a future feature, or a newsletter, or a dead-end button… • Either way, don’t stop wondering if you have reached the minimum feature-set yet Try to learn something Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 28
  28. 28. Prototyping & coding • Who will be interacting with it? • What do you hope to learn? • How much time do you have to create it? • A good toolkit / style guide allows both designers & developers to focus on interactions and earn much time Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 29
  29. 29. Run an Experiment & Get Feedback Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 30
  30. 30. • Usability testing, onsite surveys, design research, released product, whatever you choose, the whole point is collecting data to be able to decide what to do next • Test everything Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research Again, try to learn something 31
  31. 31. Making sense • Look for patterns • Park the outliers: you may discover a pattern later • Verify with other sources Declare Assumptions Create an MVP Run an Experiment Feedback and Research 32
  32. 32. Lean UX in an Scrum process 33
  33. 33. Declare Assumptions 34
  34. 34. Scrum & Lean UX • User stories, Product & Sprint Backlog, Sprint, Stand-ups, Retrospectives, that doesn’t change • but the Sprint Planning changes a bit and so does the Sprint organization… 35
  35. 35. Scrum & Lean UX Test #1 Sketching / Ideations Iteration planning meeting Usability / value testing 36 Iteration #1 Iteration #1 SPRINT SPRINT SPRINT SPRINT Test #2 Iteration #2 Iteration #2 SPRINT SPRI Iteration #3 Iteration #3 Design Development 1st cycle can be extended repeat this part
  36. 36. Thank you 37

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  • SylvainBarr

    Mar. 22, 2016
  • DennisJansen16

    Feb. 21, 2017
  • michelledlawson

    Mar. 15, 2017

Why you should apply Lean UX principles as a product development team.

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