U.S.-Cuba Sanctions
Overview <ul><li>The U.S. continues to have an extensive trade embargo on Cuba. </li></ul><ul><li>Policies have fluctuated...
Timeline <ul><li>1960 - Eisenhower puts into effect a partial economic embargo on Cuba. </li></ul><ul><li>1961 – The Forei...
Reasons for Sanctions <ul><li>Prevailing view that isolating Cuba economically will destroy it politically. </li></ul><ul>...
Effects and Contradictions <ul><li>Cuba does not pose a threat to the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Rather than weaken Castro’s r...
Benefits of removing the sanctions <ul><li>With the passing of the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 20...
  U.S. Options <ul><li>1. Maintain the status quo by keeping the embargo in place and limiting growth in Cuba in hopes tha...
The Time for Change is Now <ul><li>Small steps have fallen short; the U.S. and Cuba started out on good terms with Obama, ...
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Cuba presentation powerpoint

  1. 1. U.S.-Cuba Sanctions
  2. 2. Overview <ul><li>The U.S. continues to have an extensive trade embargo on Cuba. </li></ul><ul><li>Policies have fluctuated over the past 50 years, but overall minimal change has been made in removing the sanctions. </li></ul><ul><li>Present-day Cuba is no longer a threat to the U.S., but the issue still remains a highly politicized one. </li></ul><ul><li>Fidel and Raul Castro are more open now to U.S. talks; Raul has been implementing market reforms as well. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Timeline <ul><li>1960 - Eisenhower puts into effect a partial economic embargo on Cuba. </li></ul><ul><li>1961 – The Foreign Assistance Act prohibits all aid to Cuba and allows for a total embargo. </li></ul><ul><li>Kennedy bans all trade and amends The Foreign Assistance Act to prohibit any country to provide aid to Cuba. </li></ul><ul><li>Carter lifts travel ban in 1977, but Reagan reinstates it in 1981. Inspired by the Mariel boatlift incident in 1980. </li></ul><ul><li>Cuban Democracy act of 1992 </li></ul><ul><li>Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (Helms-Burton) Act of 1996 </li></ul><ul><li>Bush II tightened travel restrictions and Cuba is placed on the States Sponsors of Terrorism List. </li></ul><ul><li>Obama implemented measures in April 2009 to relieve restrictions, but relations have worsened since the imprisonment of contractor Alan Gross in late 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>In September 2010, Obama extended sanctions until 2011. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Reasons for Sanctions <ul><li>Prevailing view that isolating Cuba economically will destroy it politically. </li></ul><ul><li>Sanctions were implemented for national security reasons given Cuba’s ties with the USSR during the Cold War. </li></ul><ul><li>A change of focus with the Cuban Democracy Act for regime change and human rights. </li></ul><ul><li>Bush II argued Cuba was supporting terrorism abroad. </li></ul><ul><li>Cuban-American activists are highly influential in countering reforms; the Cuban American National Foundation. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Effects and Contradictions <ul><li>Cuba does not pose a threat to the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Rather than weaken Castro’s regime, the embargo has strengthened it. </li></ul><ul><li>Castro uses the embargo as a scapegoat for Cuba’s economic woes and his regime has not fallen like many thought it would. </li></ul><ul><li>Bush II stated free trade promotes democracy and opposed sanctions on China due to its human rights record. </li></ul><ul><li>Venezuela is the Latin American threat, but the U.S. buys oil and allows for investments in the U.S. energy sector. </li></ul><ul><li>The Helms-Burton Act hurts U.S. relations with our allies. </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. is virtually alone in its sanctions against Cuba, and the UN has been in favor of ending them since 1992. </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. policies prevent Cuban as well as American private sector growth. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Benefits of removing the sanctions <ul><li>With the passing of the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000, the sales of U.S. agricultural products have skyrocketed. </li></ul><ul><li>Cuba is currently the 5 th largest exporter in Latin America of these product; farmers sold more to Cuba than to Brazil. </li></ul><ul><li>Cuba could become a $1 billion export market; the U.S. International Trade Commission estimates this amount in potential revenue is lost each year the sanctions remain in place. </li></ul><ul><li>With market growth, the potential for political change seems evident. </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. relations with its allies will strengthen. </li></ul>
  7. 7. U.S. Options <ul><li>1. Maintain the status quo by keeping the embargo in place and limiting growth in Cuba in hopes that the Castro regime will fall. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Loosen restrictions such as travel, remittances, and allow for more U.S. investment; taking smaller steps to reach the same goal. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Eliminate the economic embargo and the Helms-Burton Act entirely. </li></ul>
  8. 8. The Time for Change is Now <ul><li>Small steps have fallen short; the U.S. and Cuba started out on good terms with Obama, but relations are now bitter and Cuba says the U.S. is not doing enough . </li></ul><ul><li>The Castro regime has changed; Raul is open to market changes. </li></ul><ul><li>The Helms-Burton Act hinders relations with our allies; the UN and the EU have long been opposed to the embargo. </li></ul><ul><li>CANF has had a change of heart; the focus now is on Cuban citizens. </li></ul><ul><li>Cuba is a critical U.S. agricultural market. </li></ul><ul><li>The embargo symbolizes U.S. hypocrisy; the Cuba double standard. </li></ul><ul><li>Internal growth will meet U.S. goals better than external isolation. </li></ul>

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