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A clean approach to facilitating reflective practice

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James Lawley and Penny Tompkins led a workshop sponsored by the Faculty of Education of Masaryk University at Brno, in the Czech Republic. It was attended by facilitators of Reflective Practice for teachers. The topic was applying ’A Clean Approach to Facilitating Reflective Practice’.

Published in: Education

A clean approach to facilitating reflective practice

  1. 1. A ‘Clean’ Approach to Facilitating Reflective Practice ! Masaryk University, 22-23 Oct 2014 facilitated by James Lawley & Penny Tompkins 1 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  2. 2. Thank you to Jakub Lanc and Jan Nehyba for making our events at Masaryk University happen. 2 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  3. 3. ‘Clean’ approaches are based on the principles of David Grove’s Clean Language. ! They aim to minimise unintended influence on the part of the facilitator. ! They direct attention at a process level while not introducing any facilitator-generated content. 3 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  4. 4. David Grove (1950-2008) developer of Clean Language James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 4
  5. 5. Clean questions aim to leave people free to answer from their personal lexicon and from their own way of experiencing the world. ! To do this they need to be free from metaphors, concepts, opinions and presupposed answers introduced by the facilitator. 5 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  6. 6. Examples of Common Clean Questions And how do you know [ ]? And that's [ ] like what? And what kind of [ ] is that [ ]? And is there anything else about [ ]? And where/whereabouts is [ ]? James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 Relate over Time And then what happens? 6 or And what happens next? Relate over Time And what happens just before [event]? Identify Develop Form Relate across Space And when/as [X], what happens to [Y]? [ ] = a selection of the other person’s exact words.
  7. 7. A clean approach to Reflective Practice aims to facilitate reflectors to improve their practice by: ! (a) enhancing the effectiveness of their reflection and (b) deepening their understanding of their process of reflection and its application to their practice (i.e. self-modelling). 7 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  8. 8. ! Highly effective Reflective Practice requires facilitators to be able to: ! √ recognise the multiple levels/layers and frames/purpose involved in communication. ! √ become skilled at purposefully directing attention. 8 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  9. 9. Take a moment to consider: ! What is something about your facilitating of Reflective Practice you would like to improve? 9 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  10. 10. Take a moment to consider: ! What is something about your facilitating of Reflective Practice you would like to improve? 10 What did you do internally to answer that question? James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  11. 11. Part (a): On a Scale of 0 to 10, ! How competent would you say you are at facilitating Reflective Practice? !! 0 10 no skill expert ! 11 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  12. 12. Part (a): On a Scale of 0 to 10, ! How competent would you say you are at facilitating Reflective Practice? !! 0 10 no skill expert ! Part (b): As a group, stand in a line representing where each person is on their 0 to 10 scale. ! Discuss with the person next to you how you arrived at your assessment. 12 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  13. 13. 1. What have you learned from facilitating Reflective Practice? 13 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  14. 14. 1. What have you learned from facilitating Reflective Practice? 14 2. How did you arrive at [your answer to number 1]? James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  15. 15. 1. What have you learned from facilitating Reflective Practice? 15 2. How did you arrive at [your answer to number 1]? 3. What difference has knowing that made? James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  16. 16. 1. What have you learned from facilitating Reflective Practice? 16 2. How did you arrive at [your answer to number 1]? 3. What difference has knowing that made? 4. How did you know [your answer to number 3]? James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  17. 17. ! Notice the progressive nature of this series of questions designed to activate reflection: !! 1. What have you learned from facilitating Reflective Practice? ! 2. How did you arrive at [your answer to number 1]? ! 3. What difference has knowing that made? ! 4. How did you know [your answer to number 3]? 17 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  18. 18. The Lawley & Tompkins model of Reflective Practice involves two parallel processes (each with 2 aspects): ! External behaviour (Event) - verbal & nonverbal ! Internal behaviour (Experience) - State and Strategy ! and, 5 components: ! 1. Reflection 2. Desired Outcome 3. Plan 4. Practice 5. Feedback 18 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  19. 19. Lawley & Tompkins model of ! Effective Reflective Practice Core reflection to enhance professional growth 49 Event (exterior) Experience (interior) Feedback on (4) - external - internal Reflection on (4) and (5) Desired Outcome for future (4) and Evidence for success Plan for (2) and What if doesn’t go to plan? Figure 1. The ALACT model describing a structured process of reflection Gainor (2001), Egan (2000), Havens (1986), Rice and Greenberg (1990) and Vanaerschot (1990). James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 19
  20. 20. !!! General framing questions for the Reflective Practice facilitator to consider throughout the facilitating process: !! 1. What is the context/agreement you have with the person/group? ! 2. What do they want from your facilitating? ! 3. Where would it be useful for their attention to go? (CLUE: Listen to, and make use of, their metaphors) ! 4. What clean question will likely facilitate that? 20 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  21. 21. Questions for the five stages of the Lawley-Tompkins Reflective Practice model - created by the Masaryk University workshop participants: 21 4 Describing the EVENT (exterior) and EXPERIENCE (interior) Is there an event you would like to reflect on? What was happening at the time? What was on your mind when […]? What did you do/say? What did others do/say? What happened next? What happened just before […]? What was happening for you at that time? What were you thinking and feeling? What expectations/plans did you have? What were you trying to achieve at the time? 5 - Noting FEEDBACK about (4) external and internal How do you know […] happened? How do you assess what happened? How did others react when […]? What did they say about it afterwards? What do you think they made of what happened? 1 - REFLECTING on (4) and (5) What does that mean for you? What was most important about it? For you, the whole event was like what? What can you learn from what happened? How do you feel now about the feedback? What difference does knowing this make? 2a Deciding a DESIRED OUTCOME When […] happened, how would you have liked to have responded? So when […] was a problem, what would you like to have happen in future? Is there anything else about [desired outcome]? When [desired outcome], then what happens? 2b Defining EVIDENCE OF SUCCESS How will you know when [desired outcome] has happened? What is happening when you are [in desired outcome state]? When you [desired outcome], what happens to [frame/purpose for reflecting]? Then what will happen to [problem state]? 3a PLANNING for (2) When you want [...], what needs to happen for that to happen? How will [desired outcome] happen? What might you say/do [in desired outcome context]? 3b What if it doesn’t go to plan? What can you do if [desired outcome] doesn't happen? What will happen if your plan doesn't work? James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  22. 22. Lawley-Tompkins model of Reflective Practice compared to two other models KOLB equivalent: ! 1a What happened? (External) Active Experimentation 1b. What was experienced? (Internal) Concrete Experience ! 1c. What meaning is given to 1a & 1b? Reflective Observation 1d. How is that arrived at? ! 1e What is concluded/learned? Abstract Conceptualisation 1f How is 1a & 1b evaluated? ———————- DILTS’ Disney Strategy equivalent: 2a. What outcome is desired in the future? 2b. What evidence (feedback) will be used Dreamer to monitor improvement? ! 3a. What is the plan? Realist 3b. How and when will it happen? ! 3c. What might prevent the plan from working? Critic 3d. What can be done about that in advance? ——————- 4. Practice (Exterior & Interior) ——————- 5 FEEDBACK (External and Internal) 22 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  23. 23. A model for understanding Reflective Practice:! Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context (PPRC) Perceiver Relationship } Perceived Context Context James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 23
  24. 24. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 1a Perceiver (Pupil) } Perceived (Subject) Relationship Context (Learning) James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 24
  25. 25. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 1r Reflector (Pupil) } Practice Relationship Context (Learning) (Reflecting on their learning) James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 25
  26. 26. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Levels 1a and 1r James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 26
  27. 27. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 2a Perceiver (Teacher) Perceived (Pupil learning) Relationship } Context (Teaching a subject) James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 27
  28. 28. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 2b Perceiver (Teacher) Perceived (Reflective Learning) Relationship } Context (Teaching Reflective Learning) James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 28
  29. 29. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 2r Reflector (Teacher) Practice (Teaching) Relationship } Context (Reflecting on their teaching) James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 29
  30. 30. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 2a, 2b and 2r James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 30
  31. 31. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 3a Perceiver (Facilitator) Relationship (Teacher teaching RP) } Context Perceived (Facilitating teaching of Reflective Learning) James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 31
  32. 32. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 3b Perceiver (Facilitator) Relationship Reflective Practice) } Context Perceived (Teacher’s (Facilitating Teacher’s Reflective Practice) James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 32
  33. 33. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Level 3r Reflector (Facilitator) Reflective Practice) Relationship } Context Practice (Facilitating (Reflecting on facilitating Reflective Practice) James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 33
  34. 34. Applying the Perceiver-Perceived-Relationship-Context model to Reflective Practice - Levels 3a, 3b and 3r James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 34
  35. 35. Gregory Bateson’s Levels applied to Reflective Practice (RP) LEVELS PRACTICE REFLECTION Lawley & Tompkins - Facilitators Lawley & Tompkins - their coaching (4a) coaching (3a) facilitating (2b) teaching of RP (4r) own Reflective Practice (on 4a 4b 4c) (4b) coaching (3b) facilitating (2r) Teachers’ RP (4c) coaching (3r) Facilitators’s RP ———————————————————————————————-———————- Facilitator - Teachers* Facilitator - their facilitating (3a) facilitating (2b) teaching of Reflective Learning (3r) own Reflective Practice (on 3a & 3b) (3b) facilitating (2r) Teachers’ Reflective Practice ———————————————————————————————-———————- Teacher - Pupil ` Teacher - their teaching (2a) teaching (1a) subject (2r) own Reflective Practice (on 2a & 2b) (2b) teaching (1r) Pupils’ Reflective Learning ———————————————————————————————-———————- Pupil - subject Pupil - their learning (1a) learning (in class & on own) (1r) own Reflective Learning (on 1a) ! NOTES: PURPLE is all that can actually happen during this workshop. BLUE can be simulated during training exercises. * At level 3, Facilitators facilitating Teachers’ teaching of a subject has been omitted. 35 1 2 3 4 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  36. 36. On a Scale of 0 to 10, ! How competent would you now say you are at facilitating Reflective Practice? ! ! 0 10 no skill expert ! 36 James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  37. 37. 37 Clean Resources Online at cleanlanguage.co.uk ✴ 200 articles about Symbolic Modelling, Clean Language, the work of David Grove and NLP. ✴ e-groups: Clean Language Discussion Group (Facebook), Clean Language Facilitators in Business (LinkedIn) Clean Language & Symbolic Modelling Research Group (LinkedIn) Books Resolving Traumatic Memories: Metaphors and Symbols in Psychotherapy (1989) David Grove and Basil Panzer ! Metaphors in Mind: Transformation through Symbolic Modelling (2000) James Lawley and Penny Tompkins !C lean Language: Revealing Metaphors and Opening Minds (2008) Wendy Sullivan and Judy Rees !T he Power of Six: A Six Part Guide to Self Knowledge (2009) Philip Harland !T rust Me I’m the Patient: Clean Language, Metaphor, and the New Psychology of Change (2012) Philip Harland !T he Five-Minute Coach: Improve performance - rapidly (2012) Lynne Cooper and Mariette Castellino ! Mining Your Client's Metaphors : A How-To Workbook on Clean Language and Symbolic Modeling, Basics Part I: Facilitating Clarity (2012) & Part Two: Facilitating Change (2013) Gina Campbell !C lean Approaches for Coaches: How to create conditions for change using Clean Language and Symbolic Modelling (2013) Marian Way ! From Contempt To Curiosity: Creating the Conditions for Groups to Collaborate using Clean Language and Systemic Modelling (2014), Caitlin Walker ! DVDs “A Strange and Strong Sensation”, Symbolic Modelling - Change with Metaphor (2003) Penny Tompkins and James Lawley An Introduction to Clean Language and Systemic Modelling (2008) Caitlin Walker Clean Language Training Modules 1 to 4 (2010) Wendy Sullivan James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014, cleanlanguage.co.uk
  38. 38. James Lawley & Penny Tompkins, 2014 38

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