Steps along the Path:  Contextualized ESL and Workforce Education       Melissa Goldberg, Workforce Strategy Center Jonath...
Workshop Overview <ul><li>Career Pathways Overview, Rationale </li></ul><ul><li>Models for integrating skills training and...
CAREER PATHWAYS:  What and Why? <ul><li>Need for continuing skills development  </li></ul><ul><li>Sectoral and regional fr...
CAREER PATHWAYS:  Distinguishing Elements <ul><li>Data Driven </li></ul><ul><li>Employers shape the design </li></ul><ul><...
Career Pathways: A Schematic Education  Workplace Incumbent Worker Skill Upgrade Training RISE  Pathways components RISE  ...
SEQUENTIAL MODEL:  ESL or other basic skills precedes technical training, some general context related to technical traini...
CONCURRENT MODEL:  Students co-enrolled in separate classes for basic skills and technical training   <ul><li>No real coor...
COORDINATED MODEL:  Students co-enrolled in basic skills and technical training, instructors jointly plan and coordinate i...
INTEGRATED MODEL: ESL/basic skills instructors and technical instructors co-teach in classroom 50% or more of instructiona...
CONSIDERATIONS <ul><li>In selecting or modifying a model, consider: </li></ul><ul><li>Student needs and skill levels </li>...
TECHNOLOGY-ENHANCED:  Virtual Enterprise
CUNY <ul><li>Third-Largest Public University System  </li></ul><ul><li>Nation’s Largest Urban University </li></ul><ul><li...
 
<ul><ul><li>D.H. Hammond et al.   Journal of Education for  Business , 71 (May/June 1996), page 264 </li></ul></ul>Many pr...
What is VE? <ul><li>NY1 Video </li></ul><ul><li>CBS Video </li></ul>
The Program: Virtual Enterprise Defined Virtual Enterprise is an interdisciplinary, technology driven, simulation program ...
The Effect of Virtual Enterprise The effect is to immerse students in a fully functioning business where taxes and insuran...
In the same way that commercial airline pilots are trained in a flight simulator… Virtual Enterprise students will use a m...
“ Flavors” of VE <ul><li>Business Career/Entrepreneurship Development through Simulation </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy for De...
The MarketMaker
Moodle CMS/LMS [ Visit IVE  Moodle  ]
Blogs and Wordpress MU
CLIP Blogging (KCC) [ Visit Monika ]
Multimedia Blogging
GeoBlogging (KCC) [ Geography Example  ]
IVE Learning Outcomes &  Corresponding 21 st  Century Core Skills Technology Skills  (computer literacy, Internet skills, ...
IVE Learning Outcomes &  Corresponding 21 st  Century Core Skills Faculty Outcomes  (shifting roles from instructor to adv...
Virtual Enterprise and ESL
ESL/TECHNOLOGY/VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE (VE) <ul><li>The emphasis of VE is on the use of technology. VE can be adapted to any  <...
<ul><li>ESL students were given information about career/educational </li></ul><ul><li>pathways.  For instance, in the cas...
<ul><li>Students acquire workforce skills.  They learn how to set-up a business, market  </li></ul><ul><li>products and en...
WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE? <ul><li>The program is most suitable for intermediate to high intermediate  </li></ul><ul><li>stud...
Questions/Discussion <ul><li>Others who are integrating basic skills and technical skills instruction? </li></ul><ul><li>C...
Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Kingsborough Community College 718-368-5809  [email_address] Frank Milano, Cen...
Hotel Sogdiana Feel the east Sogdiana 230 West 101 Street New York, NY 10025 (212)844-7841 [email_address] www.HSI.Company...
Hotel Sogdiana’s  Green Practices <ul><li>Locally produced furniture and equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Recycle all paper and...
Reception
Picturesque View of Manhattan
You can work and relax in our club lounge
Our Grand Lobby
Atrium
Our Ballrooms
Ballroom Foyer
Our Dining/Bar area <ul><li>Our bar/dining area has a beautiful aquarium to entrance a serene and pleasant dining experien...
Sogdiana’s Restaurant
Tokami Sushi Bar
Food in our restaurants <ul><li>Fresh and delicious food from more then 15 cuisines </li></ul>
Guest Rooms
Luxury rooms Simply put, they are the very best of the best
Luxury rooms elegant and restful
Luxury rooms  Locally produced furniture and equipment
Gym   <ul><li>Great work out </li></ul>
Pool <ul><li>Relax at our pool  </li></ul>
Oasis spa <ul><li>Providing the best skin care and body products made from gentle, effective natural ingredients has not o...
Come to our hotel and you will be 100 % satisfied <ul><li>Hotel </li></ul><ul><li>Sogdiana   </li></ul>
 
Welcome To Temptation
<ul><li>Ahmed F. Tariq ( CEO ) </li></ul><ul><li>Nataliya Kostenuk ( COO ) </li></ul><ul><li>Financial Department : </li><...
“ Foodies” from the heart:  <ul><li>We take pride in using organic, sustainable food from local vendors and bring these co...
Temptation’s Green Practices <ul><li>Local produce  -  fresh and healthy fruits, vegetables, dairy, meat and poultry. </li...
Daily in our “green” menu:
Chinese food:
French food:
Italian food:
Japanese food:
Russian food:
Ukrainian food:
Delicious desserts:
Fine vintage wines:
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NCWE 2007 with Student Presentations

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NCWE 2007 with Student Presentations

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NCWE 2007 with Student Presentations

  1. 1. Steps along the Path: Contextualized ESL and Workforce Education      Melissa Goldberg, Workforce Strategy Center Jonathan Deutsch, Kingsborough Community College Frank Milano, Kingsborough Community College Donna Miller-Parker, South Seattle Community College
  2. 2. Workshop Overview <ul><li>Career Pathways Overview, Rationale </li></ul><ul><li>Models for integrating skills training and ESL </li></ul><ul><li>Kingsborough Model; emphasis on technology </li></ul><ul><li>Questions/Answers/Discussion </li></ul>
  3. 3. CAREER PATHWAYS: What and Why? <ul><li>Need for continuing skills development </li></ul><ul><li>Sectoral and regional framework </li></ul><ul><li>Central role for community colleges </li></ul><ul><li>Builds on existing capacity </li></ul>
  4. 4. CAREER PATHWAYS: Distinguishing Elements <ul><li>Data Driven </li></ul><ul><li>Employers shape the design </li></ul><ul><li>Serves the full spectrum of students/workers </li></ul><ul><li>Based on partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Integrates many funding streams </li></ul><ul><li>Process, not a program </li></ul>
  5. 5. Career Pathways: A Schematic Education Workplace Incumbent Worker Skill Upgrade Training RISE Pathways components RISE Adult Basic Ed Bridge Other career path or bridge stages Focal RISE employment skill levels Other employment skill levels Direct paths between training or skill levels Training paths to jobs/skill levels and vice-versa KEY Entry-level Skilled Jobs Entry-level Technician Jobs Skilled Technician Jobs Technical Professional & Managerial Jobs Semi-skilled Jobs Unskilled Jobs Apprenticeship Workplace Basics Vocational ESL/ABE Short-term Occup / Industry Certificate 4 Year Baccalaureate 1-year or 2-year Technical Diploma Applied Associate Degree Contextual Secondary-level ABE / ESL Bridge Advanced Postgraduate Education Intensive Work Readiness and Support Post-secondary education Adult basic education
  6. 6. SEQUENTIAL MODEL: ESL or other basic skills precedes technical training, some general context related to technical training if possible . <ul><li>Low cost </li></ul><ul><li>Minimizes enrollment and curriculum issues </li></ul><ul><li>Little coordination </li></ul><ul><li>No immediate application of skills/information </li></ul><ul><li>Less efficient, longer </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Foundations of Basic Manufacturing </li></ul>
  7. 7. CONCURRENT MODEL: Students co-enrolled in separate classes for basic skills and technical training <ul><li>No real coordination </li></ul><ul><li>Basic skills/ESL has general technical/workforce context </li></ul><ul><li>Enrollment issues not significant, some scheduling issues </li></ul><ul><li>Increased time efficiency for students, opportunity to apply new skills </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Supplemental Instruction for CNA, LPN </li></ul>
  8. 8. COORDINATED MODEL: Students co-enrolled in basic skills and technical training, instructors jointly plan and coordinate instruction <ul><li>Requires additional instructor time, flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum planning key </li></ul><ul><li>Additional costs </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduling issues for students </li></ul><ul><li>Requires student cohort </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Linked courses in ESL for Business and Medical Receptionist </li></ul>
  9. 9. INTEGRATED MODEL: ESL/basic skills instructors and technical instructors co-teach in classroom 50% or more of instructional time <ul><li>most expensive model </li></ul><ul><li>time required for coordinated planning and assessment </li></ul><ul><li>instructors must define roles clearly and see each other as equal partners; requires significant flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Most time-efficient for students; high degree of relevance </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Integrated ESL/ABE and Auto Service Technician </li></ul>
  10. 10. CONSIDERATIONS <ul><li>In selecting or modifying a model, consider: </li></ul><ul><li>Student needs and skill levels </li></ul><ul><li>Cohorts vs. individual students </li></ul><ul><li>Scheduling </li></ul><ul><li>Possibility of coordination and development time </li></ul><ul><li>Faculty skills, flexibility, availability </li></ul><ul><li>Available funding </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum adaptability </li></ul>
  11. 11. TECHNOLOGY-ENHANCED: Virtual Enterprise
  12. 12. CUNY <ul><li>Third-Largest Public University System </li></ul><ul><li>Nation’s Largest Urban University </li></ul><ul><li>450,000 Students (46% of New York’s College population) </li></ul><ul><li>23 Institutions </li></ul><ul><li>11 Senior Colleges </li></ul><ul><li>6 Community Colleges </li></ul>
  13. 14. <ul><ul><li>D.H. Hammond et al. Journal of Education for Business , 71 (May/June 1996), page 264 </li></ul></ul>Many professors still require students to memorize their course materials and then complete closed-book examinations. We could find no record of a business meeting in which the CEO said, “Please put all your books and notes under the table and take out a clean piece of paper; we are going to make a business decision.” The Institute for Virtual Enterprise
  14. 15. What is VE? <ul><li>NY1 Video </li></ul><ul><li>CBS Video </li></ul>
  15. 16. The Program: Virtual Enterprise Defined Virtual Enterprise is an interdisciplinary, technology driven, simulation program in which students develop and manage global entrepreneurial enterprises in a virtual environment. Students trade their products and services via e-commerce strategies through a worldwide network of 4,000 firms in more than 40 countries. According to their type of business, the staff of the enterprise will tackle entrepreneurial business case issues such as marketing, sales, service, IT/IS, finance, human resource development, and administration. The Institute for Virtual Enterprise
  16. 17. The Effect of Virtual Enterprise The effect is to immerse students in a fully functioning business where taxes and insurance premiums must be paid, ad space must be negotiated, employee training must be planned, e-mails responded to, faxes sent, and most importantly, commitments to co-workers and deadlines must be honored. The Institute for Virtual Enterprise
  17. 18. In the same way that commercial airline pilots are trained in a flight simulator… Virtual Enterprise students will use a model of business reality in order to learn the necessary competencies to be successful in the current knowledge and information based economy. Virtual Enterprise in Action The Institute for Virtual Enterprise
  18. 19. “ Flavors” of VE <ul><li>Business Career/Entrepreneurship Development through Simulation </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy for Developmental Education </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy for Specific Skill Development </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy for Financial/Business Literacy across the Disciplines </li></ul><ul><li>Vehicle for Leadership Development </li></ul><ul><li>Community/Workforce Development </li></ul>The Institute for Virtual Enterprise
  19. 20. The MarketMaker
  20. 21. Moodle CMS/LMS [ Visit IVE Moodle ]
  21. 22. Blogs and Wordpress MU
  22. 23. CLIP Blogging (KCC) [ Visit Monika ]
  23. 24. Multimedia Blogging
  24. 25. GeoBlogging (KCC) [ Geography Example ]
  25. 26. IVE Learning Outcomes & Corresponding 21 st Century Core Skills Technology Skills (computer literacy, Internet skills, retrieving and managing information via technology) Technology Skills (computer literacy, Internet skills, retrieving and managing information via technology) Interpersonal Skills (teamwork, relationship management, conflict resolution) Interpersonal Skills (teamwork, relationship management, conflict resolution, workplace skills) Information Management Skills (collecting, analyzing, and organizing information from a variety of sources) Information Management Skills (collecting, analyzing, and organizing information from a variety of sources) Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluation, decision-making, creative thinking) Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluation, decision-making, creative thinking) Global Awareness (understanding the global marketplace, culture and diversity) Community Skills (citizenship; diversity/pluralism; local, community, global, environmental awareness) Communication Skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) Communication Skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) IVE Learning Outcomes 21 st Century Core Skills
  26. 27. IVE Learning Outcomes & Corresponding 21 st Century Core Skills Faculty Outcomes (shifting roles from instructor to advisor-coach-facilitator, functioning in cross-disciplinary teams) Motivational Outcomes (understanding the connection between academic skills and attainment of career goals, career self-efficacy expectations) Entrepreneurship/Business Knowledge (developing business plans, developing marketing and sales strategies, accounting skills, etc.) Intrapersonal Skills (ability to understand and manage self, management of change, learning to learn, personal responsibility) Personal Skills (ability to understand and manage self, management of change, learning to learn, personal responsibility, aesthetic responsiveness, wellness) IVE Learning Outcomes 21 st Century Core Skills
  27. 28. Virtual Enterprise and ESL
  28. 29. ESL/TECHNOLOGY/VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE (VE) <ul><li>The emphasis of VE is on the use of technology. VE can be adapted to any </li></ul><ul><li>of the career interests of the students. </li></ul><ul><li>ESL Students at Kingsborough created PowerPoint presentations, videos, </li></ul><ul><li>graphics for pamphlets, logos, business cards, and engaged in website </li></ul><ul><li>design as they created virtual businesses that were related to restaurants, </li></ul><ul><li>hotels, and cruise lines. </li></ul><ul><li>The VE/ESL model is more of a coordinated one. The ESL instructor and </li></ul><ul><li>the (VE) content instructor were in the classroom together. The ESL </li></ul><ul><li>instructor also met with students during class time to support the work they </li></ul><ul><li>were doing with VE. For example, students that created restaurants read </li></ul><ul><li>Fast Food Nation, learned about nutrition and studied some ecology to make </li></ul><ul><li>their business more eco-friendly. </li></ul>
  29. 30. <ul><li>ESL students were given information about career/educational </li></ul><ul><li>pathways. For instance, in the case of food management: </li></ul><ul><li>Dietary Worker (Server, Dietary Clerk, Pot Washer) - $29,000 to $32,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Cook’s Helper (Counter Aides/Cashiers/Storeroom Clerks) - $29,000 to $32,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Second & Third Cooks/Dietary Technician $33,000 to $39,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Food Supervisor - $37,000 to $45,000 (ServSafe/DOH Certification) </li></ul><ul><li>Food Service Manager - $42,000 to $50,000 (A.A.S. Degree) </li></ul><ul><li>Food Service Director - $75,000 (Bachelor’s Degree or required years as a manager) </li></ul>CAREER PATHWAYS
  30. 31. <ul><li>Students acquire workforce skills. They learn how to set-up a business, market </li></ul><ul><li>products and engage in public speaking. </li></ul><ul><li>Students acquire computer literacy. Students learn how to create websites, use </li></ul><ul><li>blogs, and create PowerPoint presentations. </li></ul><ul><li>It may improve retention of students going onto college. Students were able to </li></ul><ul><li>bank college credits for their VE experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Students may achieve industry credentials. </li></ul><ul><li>Students acquire language skills. Students write business memos, practice </li></ul><ul><li>speaking, and use language in a more authentic way. </li></ul>POSSIBLE OUTCOMES
  31. 32. WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE? <ul><li>The program is most suitable for intermediate to high intermediate </li></ul><ul><li>students as part of a full-time rather than a part-time program. </li></ul><ul><li>Language study skills still need to be emphasized. </li></ul><ul><li>Students should take this as an elective, preferably students interested </li></ul><ul><li>in upgrading workforce skills or students interested in a business </li></ul><ul><li>related field. </li></ul><ul><li>Students should be comfortable with a student centered approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Students need some computer literacy. </li></ul>
  32. 33. Questions/Discussion <ul><li>Others who are integrating basic skills and technical skills instruction? </li></ul><ul><li>Concerns? Issues? </li></ul>
  33. 34. Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Kingsborough Community College 718-368-5809 [email_address] Frank Milano, Center for Economic and Workforce Development Kingsborough Community College 718-368-5143, [email_address] Melissa Goldberg Senior Associate, Workforce Strategy Center 845-753-5078, [email_address] Donna Miller-Parker, M.A. Dean for General Studies South Seattle Community College 206-768-6869, dmiller@sccd.ctc.edu
  34. 35. Hotel Sogdiana Feel the east Sogdiana 230 West 101 Street New York, NY 10025 (212)844-7841 [email_address] www.HSI.Company.com
  35. 36. Hotel Sogdiana’s Green Practices <ul><li>Locally produced furniture and equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Recycle all paper and glass </li></ul><ul><li>Web and internet registration to save paper </li></ul><ul><li>Toilet flush to minimize use of water </li></ul><ul><li>Use daylight as much as possible to save energy. Power </li></ul><ul><li>saving lamps. A.C. etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Motion detectors for electricity </li></ul><ul><li>Skylights to allow natural light and energy </li></ul><ul><li>Solar energy where possible - heating water </li></ul><ul><li>Paint – natural – green and orange. Orange helps in digestion. Green is restful – renews body and mind </li></ul><ul><li>5% of profits donated to “Green Peace” </li></ul><ul><li>Plant trees, flowers and plants to absorb carbon monoxide </li></ul><ul><li>Many trash cans to enhance recycling </li></ul>
  36. 37. Reception
  37. 38. Picturesque View of Manhattan
  38. 39. You can work and relax in our club lounge
  39. 40. Our Grand Lobby
  40. 41. Atrium
  41. 42. Our Ballrooms
  42. 43. Ballroom Foyer
  43. 44. Our Dining/Bar area <ul><li>Our bar/dining area has a beautiful aquarium to entrance a serene and pleasant dining experience </li></ul>
  44. 45. Sogdiana’s Restaurant
  45. 46. Tokami Sushi Bar
  46. 47. Food in our restaurants <ul><li>Fresh and delicious food from more then 15 cuisines </li></ul>
  47. 48. Guest Rooms
  48. 49. Luxury rooms Simply put, they are the very best of the best
  49. 50. Luxury rooms elegant and restful
  50. 51. Luxury rooms Locally produced furniture and equipment
  51. 52. Gym <ul><li>Great work out </li></ul>
  52. 53. Pool <ul><li>Relax at our pool </li></ul>
  53. 54. Oasis spa <ul><li>Providing the best skin care and body products made from gentle, effective natural ingredients has not only been our passion but our mission. </li></ul>
  54. 55. Come to our hotel and you will be 100 % satisfied <ul><li>Hotel </li></ul><ul><li>Sogdiana </li></ul>
  55. 57. Welcome To Temptation
  56. 58. <ul><li>Ahmed F. Tariq ( CEO ) </li></ul><ul><li>Nataliya Kostenuk ( COO ) </li></ul><ul><li>Financial Department : </li></ul><ul><li>Fanny Ng (Manager) </li></ul><ul><li>Larisa Kleiner </li></ul><ul><li>Human Resources Department : </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Mu (Manager) </li></ul><ul><li>Tatyana Burmistrova </li></ul><ul><li>Sales and Marketing Department : </li></ul><ul><li>Faheem Wahand </li></ul><ul><li>Jin Hui Lu - Gene </li></ul><ul><li>Information Technology Department : </li></ul><ul><li>Alisher Rakhmanov </li></ul><ul><li>Qunli Huang - Mandy </li></ul>
  57. 59. “ Foodies” from the heart: <ul><li>We take pride in using organic, sustainable food from local vendors and bring these components together in dishes that are both delicious and beautiful to behold. </li></ul><ul><li>Every menu we create is customized to match your taste and style. </li></ul><ul><li>We assemble the freshest and finest seasonal ingredients, present them with flair and beauty . </li></ul>
  58. 60. Temptation’s Green Practices <ul><li>Local produce - fresh and healthy fruits, vegetables, dairy, meat and poultry. </li></ul><ul><li>Energy savers - lamps, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Conserve water - filtered water. Pollution efficient - safety and health issues </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment - China & cutlery – medium priced. Cut down on paper products </li></ul><ul><li>Doors and windows should be energy efficient </li></ul><ul><li>Decoration - use of natural products. Children’s playroom. Peaceful and restful atmosphere </li></ul><ul><li>Garbage – recycled. To be collected often </li></ul><ul><li>To minimize air pollution – encourage bicycle use (discounts and gift certificates given. </li></ul><ul><li>Security - web cameras </li></ul><ul><li>Special air conditioning system – energy efficient </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver food </li></ul><ul><li>Flowers, plants and fish tanks – relaxing atmosphere </li></ul>
  59. 61. Daily in our “green” menu:
  60. 62. Chinese food:
  61. 63. French food:
  62. 64. Italian food:
  63. 65. Japanese food:
  64. 66. Russian food:
  65. 67. Ukrainian food:
  66. 68. Delicious desserts:
  67. 69. Fine vintage wines:

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