Conducting research

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Conducting research

  1. 1. Conducting Research Preparing Source and Information Cards
  2. 2. Source Cards <ul><li>Source Cards: Each Source receives only one card. It should have the following information: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A source number in the upper right corner that will also appear on the note cards taken from this source. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The type of source in the upper right hand corner of the card. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bibliographical information according to the attached sheet or the M.L.A. handbook. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Sample Source Card <ul><li>Source #: 1 </li></ul><ul><li> Source Type: Periodical </li></ul><ul><li>Shorer, Mark. “With Grace Under Pressure.” </li></ul><ul><li>New Republic. 6 Oct. 1962: 19-20. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  4. 4. Alternate Collection: Microsoft Word <ul><li>If you would like to collect your sources and information using Microsoft word, you may do so in the “Notebook” function with the: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Source # and Type as the First Bullet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Bibliography Citation as the Second Bullett </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 st piece of information below </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2 nd piece of information below </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>3 rd piece of information below </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Microsoft Word Option <ul><li>Source: 1; Source Type: Periodical </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shorer, Mark. “With Grace Under Pressure.” New Republic. 6 Oct. 1962: 19-20. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Information Cards <ul><li>A minimum of 30 research note cards PLUS a bibliography card for each source for a total of 37 cards. All note cards must follow appropriate guidelines. </li></ul><ul><li>Creating Notecards: When you create notecards, you need to keep in mind that each notecard should not necessarily be full. You need to take down information in organized bits. Therefore, you need to consider how each bit of information pertains to other bits of information. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Information Card Format <ul><li>Put the source number in the top right corner of the card. </li></ul><ul><li>Put the page number in the top right corner of the card. If you are using an internet source, you might put the link name in the top right instead. </li></ul><ul><li>Put the type of information (fact, paraphrase, or quotation) below the information. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Sample Information Card <ul><li>1: pp. 130 </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Quotation </li></ul><ul><li>“ Even though Bob loved to watch TV, his ambition carried him to Harvard where he got involved with politics and debate.” </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Source Number Page Number(s) Type of Information
  9. 9. Sample Microsoft Word Entry <ul><li>Source: 1; Source Type: Periodical </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shorer, Mark. “With Grace Under Pressure.” New Republic. 6 Oct. 1962: 19-20. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pp. 130 - Quotation : “Even though Bob loved to watch TV, his ambition carried him to Harvard where he got involved with politics and debate.” </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Types of Information <ul><li>Fact: When you are recording facts about your topic, you want to use bullets; remember to keep your information in organized bits. Fact cards are often basic facts about a person or event and they do not express opinions, attitudes, or feelings. </li></ul><ul><li>Paraphrase: If you find a large chunk of information that you think is important, you want to paraphrase it. For example, you may find the opinions of the author on your topic that spans a full page in a book. In this case, you want to rewrite the information in your own words, capturing the essence of the information. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Quotation: It is incredibly important that you gather quotations in your research. These add validity and strength to your main point in you writing. Quotations are anything that you take word for word from a source and do not have to be somebody quoted in the source. You should try to find quotations that express opinion, attitudes, or feelings about your topic. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Order of Operations <ul><li>Find a source - skim to see if it is valid and useful </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the type of source (book, periodical, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Write source number, type, and bibliography citation on a card or in your word document </li></ul><ul><li>Review through the source identifying good information for your paper </li></ul><ul><li>Identify if the information is best as a fact, paraphrased information, or as a quotation </li></ul><ul><li>Write down the source number and page number as well as the information on a notecard or bullet </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat steps 5 and 6 until you have all of the information you might use from that source </li></ul>
  12. 12. Sample Process <ul><li>http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/16/books/review/16barcott.html?_r=1&pagewanted=print </li></ul>

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