Scientists’ and talented students’ contributions to an innovative secondary science curriculum Ton van der Valk, Florine M...
Outline <ul><li>The issue </li></ul><ul><li>The context  </li></ul><ul><li>Research question </li></ul><ul><li>Data  colle...
The issue: innovative  lesson material  <ul><li>Construction of lesson material for senior secondary education: </li></ul>...
An easy solution? <ul><li>Involve expert scientists in curriculum development </li></ul><ul><li>However: some problems </l...
Context of the study  <ul><li>JCU: grade 11/12 science programme (2004) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>for 100 selected talented st...
The JCU curriculum development model <ul><li>Enrichment module for JCU </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developed by expert scientist...
JCU modules  <ul><li>12 certificated JCU modules for NLT </li></ul><ul><li>4 more, almost ready </li></ul><ul><li>Example ...
Research question <ul><li>How can expert scientists effectively contribute to the development of innovative lesson materia...
Data collection and analysis <ul><li>Observations and interviews during the development of JCU-modules </li></ul><ul><li>E...
Results 1: Scientists’ motivation to participate <ul><li>Teaching talented grade 11/12 students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>teac...
Results 2: three models <ul><li>Three models of participation of expert scientists in curriculum development: </li></ul><u...
Model 1. Expert scientists as the authors <ul><li>Science experts as authors of chapters </li></ul><ul><li>Revision by edu...
Model  2. Content-specialist developers <ul><li>Typical example:  The Molecules of Life </li></ul><ul><li>Author: (junior)...
Model 3. scientist – developer cooperation <ul><li>Typical examples </li></ul><ul><li>1: (evolved from model 1)  The Dynam...
Conclusions <ul><li>Essential elements of a constructing innovative lesson materials orientating to university research: <...
Recommendations for devel-opment of innovative curricula <ul><li>Involve expert scientists in teaching talented students <...
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Scientists’ and talented students’ contributions to an innovative secondary science curriculum

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Presentation for the 2011 ESERA conference in Lyon, France, by Ton van der Valk. Different models of involving science experts in the development of science education for secondary school.

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Scientists’ and talented students’ contributions to an innovative secondary science curriculum

  1. 1. Scientists’ and talented students’ contributions to an innovative secondary science curriculum Ton van der Valk, Florine Meijer FIsme and Junior College Utrecht Utrecht University [email_address]
  2. 2. Outline <ul><li>The issue </li></ul><ul><li>The context </li></ul><ul><li>Research question </li></ul><ul><li>Data collection and analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul>
  3. 3. The issue: innovative lesson material <ul><li>Construction of lesson material for senior secondary education: </li></ul><ul><li>Usually done by experienced teachers / curriculum developers </li></ul><ul><li>Having few knowledge of recent developments in science research </li></ul><ul><li>Need for innovative material orienting on academic science research </li></ul><ul><li> How to construct such lesson material? </li></ul>
  4. 4. An easy solution? <ul><li>Involve expert scientists in curriculum development </li></ul><ul><li>However: some problems </li></ul><ul><li>How to motivate scientists ? </li></ul><ul><li>How to combine the scientists’ and developers’ perspective on science education? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>differences e.g. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For all/ for the ‘best’ students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accounting for students’ pre-knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What should be the target level? </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Context of the study <ul><li>JCU: grade 11/12 science programme (2004) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>for 100 selected talented students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>working place for curriculum innovation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cooperation Utrecht University with 29 schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enriched curriculum, 2 days a week </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nature, Life and Technology: an innovative secondary school curriculum (2007) aiming at: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Valid view on modern scientific practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge of recent developments in science </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Orientation on a science/technology career </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. The JCU curriculum development model <ul><li>Enrichment module for JCU </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developed by expert scientists + developers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Taught to JCU students by subject specialists </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback by students; evaluation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NLT module for partner schools </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Revised by curriculum developers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Taught in partner schools by their teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback by students, teachers; evaluation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>NLT-module, nation-wide available </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Revised by curriculum developers and teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Certification by the national NLT Committee </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. JCU modules <ul><li>12 certificated JCU modules for NLT </li></ul><ul><li>4 more, almost ready </li></ul><ul><li>Example titles: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Molecules of Life (available in English) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Dynamic Earth (available in English) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heart and Veins </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Lifecycle of Stars </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ice and Climate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Game Technology </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Research question <ul><li>How can expert scientists effectively contribute to the development of innovative lesson material for senior secondary school students with: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Valid view on modern scientific practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge of recent developments in science </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Orientation on a science/technology career? </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Data collection and analysis <ul><li>Observations and interviews during the development of JCU-modules </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation data (classroom observations, student logbooks, questionnaires) </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Arguments in discussions between expert scientists and developers </li></ul><ul><li>The role of experiences with talented students and their feedback </li></ul>
  10. 10. Results 1: Scientists’ motivation to participate <ul><li>Teaching talented grade 11/12 students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>teaching experiences and student evaluations supply scientist with new perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Attracting bright students to study X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Meeting alumni as university students helps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Convincing ways of promoting study X in upper secondary education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Planned dissemination is essential </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>scientists contributions to teacher professionalisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Try-out on partner schools </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Results 2: three models <ul><li>Three models of participation of expert scientists in curriculum development: </li></ul><ul><li>Expert scientists as authors </li></ul><ul><li>Well-informed developer as the author </li></ul><ul><li>Scientist – developer cooperation </li></ul>
  12. 12. Model 1. Expert scientists as the authors <ul><li>Science experts as authors of chapters </li></ul><ul><li>Revision by educational developer </li></ul><ul><li>Dangers </li></ul><ul><li>Module with too much (specialist) content </li></ul><ul><li>Weak didactical structure </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate attachment to pre-knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Hard to teach by secondary school teachers </li></ul><ul><li>(sometimes unproductive) discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Completeness/correctness vs. educational quality </li></ul><ul><li>Did the JCU students enjoyed and understand? Scientists: ‘Oh yes, they did’ (but how about the less bright/ motivated students in the class?) </li></ul>
  13. 13. Model 2. Content-specialist developers <ul><li>Typical example: The Molecules of Life </li></ul><ul><li>Author: (junior) specialist in science and education </li></ul><ul><li>Advisor: senior science specialist </li></ul><ul><li>Advantages </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate content and educational structure </li></ul><ul><li>Productive discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Problems </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes less contact with recent developments in the research field </li></ul><ul><li>Content-specialist developers are hard to find </li></ul><ul><li>Few scientists – developer discussions and scientist – student contacts </li></ul>
  14. 14. Model 3. scientist – developer cooperation <ul><li>Typical examples </li></ul><ul><li>1: (evolved from model 1) The Dynamic Earth </li></ul><ul><li>2: (from the start) Heart and Veins </li></ul><ul><li>Authors: scientists and developers </li></ul><ul><li>Good relations! Developer being alumnus helps! </li></ul><ul><li>Developer can suggest (content and pedagogy) adequate alternatives </li></ul><ul><li>Developer elaborates varying methods </li></ul><ul><li>Many productive discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Direct scientist – student contacts </li></ul>
  15. 15. Conclusions <ul><li>Essential elements of a constructing innovative lesson materials orientating to university research: </li></ul><ul><li>University / school partnership </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching talented secondary students </li></ul><ul><li>A curriculum framework for the produced lesson material </li></ul><ul><li>Readiness to learn from each other </li></ul><ul><li>Model 3 is preferable; model 2 is a good alternative </li></ul>
  16. 16. Recommendations for devel-opment of innovative curricula <ul><li>Involve expert scientists in teaching talented students </li></ul><ul><li>In the perspective of developing an innovative curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperation model </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum plan </li></ul><ul><li>Involve young scientists in secondary science teaching and curriculum development (education of developers) </li></ul>

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