Healthy Meal Planning <ul><li>April 27, 2 p.m. EST </li></ul><ul><li>Speakers – DC Central Kitchen </li></ul><ul><li>Joell...
Buy Fresh Buy Local Saving money through buying direct and other tips of the trade
2010-2011  DCCK’s Local Food Highlights <ul><li>In 2010, DCCK purchased over 170,000 lbs of local product </li></ul><ul><u...
Tips of the Trade  how you can cut costs and buy local <ul><li>Buy in Bulk </li></ul><ul><li>Buy directly from the farmer ...
Providing Nutritious Meals for Campus Kitchens Lindsey Palmer, RD DC Central Kitchen
What is a Complete Meal? <ul><li>Components that make up a complete meal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Protein </li></ul></ul><ul>...
Protein <ul><li>A protein component can be  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beef </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chicken </li></ul></ul><...
Grains <ul><li>A grain can be anything from whole wheat bread to pasta to rice to couscous </li></ul><ul><li>Whole grain p...
Fruit <ul><li>Getting 2-3 servings of fruit per day is important for balanced nutrition but fruit can encompass a multiple...
Vegetables <ul><li>Similar to fruit, fresh, local, seasonal vegetables tend to be cheaper and pack more nutritional value ...
Nutrition Related Programs <ul><li>If your Campus Kitchen is interested in hosting nutrition classes, check with your scho...
Topics for Nutrition Education Classes <ul><li>Shopping on a budget </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing fruit and vegetable consu...
Portion Sizes
Portion Sizes
Resources <ul><li>Great resources for nutrition education and handouts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MyPyramid.gov  </li></ul></ul...
Making Healthy Food Taste Good <ul><li>Allison Sosna, Executive Chef of Contract Foods </li></ul>
Making & Marketing Your Healthy Meals   <ul><li>Kids, students, and adults all need encouragement on why your healthy meal...
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Healthy Meal Planning

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Covering local food procurement, meal components, portion-sizes, nutrition education, and meal marketing.

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  • Depending on the agencies you serve and the population of the clients, the requirements might vary program to program. A traditional USDA reimbursable meal encompasses these 5 components. Its best to balance meals with grains, protein and vegetables and insert fruit, 100% fruit juices and fruit based desserts when applicable
  • Beans and cheese tend to be cheaper and available at many foods banks or as a commodity item; it also is more “green” and better for the environment when compared to using beef or chicken. Bean and cheese burritos are a great way to combine the two as well as bean based chillis; it also excites client if you are tying it into a theme based meal, such as Hispanic food or Super Bowl Sunday meal
  • Grains and carbohydrates should make up about ½ of a persons caloric intake for the day, focusing on whole grains. Be creative with the products you be getting in; if you don’t serve breakfast and you get in whole grain bagels, you can turn them into pizza bagels
  • Local fruits and vegetables are cheaper and more nutritious when is season; they tend to have more flavor and vitamins and minerals due to the ripening process. Frozen fruit is also a cheaper alternative in the winter months; frozen fruits and vegetables are picked and flash frozen at their peak of ripeness, making them similar in flavor to fresh items. All fruits have different vitamin and mineral properties so no one fruit is better than another but it is important to try to give clients a variety when available. Changing fruits up from apples to bananas to oranges to pear to berries keeps the clients from being exposed to the same nutrients day to day.
  • When cooking with canned items, such as sauces, vegetables and other items, don’t forget to tend to have a higher salt content then they might taste so watch out how much salt you are adding. Depending on the client population, sodium intake might be something to monitor and can be easily swapped out for spices and herbs with more flavor.
  • Many colleges and universities have some type of nutrition program, even if its just a minor. Checking with faculty and staff as well as student groups are great ways to get clients access to nutrition education. They could be monthly, 1 hour commitments to engage staff, students and clients; don’t feel like your classes should just be for clients. Getting students involved gets dialog and question sessions going which then make the lesson don’t feel like a “nutrition education lesson.” It is important to make sure the topic is also relevant to the population you are teaching; if you find the group is no responding well, change up the lesson and ask to know what they want to learn about.
  • Make the lessons fun and educational. Make sure you have a lesson plan with learning objectives ready to go; depending on the age and education of your class, try to only have 1-2 learning objectives for each class. More than that and the class will lose focus of what you are trying to teach. Handouts are a great way to reinforce what you are teaching as well as give them something to take home and review. I give tons of handouts to back up what I teach just incase the class is too much for them to understand at once, they can take what I have given then home to digest.
  • Healthy Meal Planning

    1. 1. Healthy Meal Planning <ul><li>April 27, 2 p.m. EST </li></ul><ul><li>Speakers – DC Central Kitchen </li></ul><ul><li>Joelle Johnson, Local Food Procurement Coordinator </li></ul><ul><li>Lindsey Palmer, Registered Dietician </li></ul><ul><li>Allison Sosna, Executive Chef of Contract Foods </li></ul>
    2. 2. Buy Fresh Buy Local Saving money through buying direct and other tips of the trade
    3. 3. 2010-2011 DCCK’s Local Food Highlights <ul><li>In 2010, DCCK purchased over 170,000 lbs of local product </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This resulted in a savings of over $50,000 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Local Meat Buying Program- in August 2010, Fresh Start began serving local, anti-biotic, hormone free beef in schools for the same amount that we were paying our vendors. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ground beef and beef patties come from cull dairy cows ($2.69/lb for ground) ($3.15/lb for patties) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>We are saving $0.20/unit with the hamburger patties </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Further cost savings in 2011 – harnessing our bulk purchasing power with the main Kitchen, we were able to sign contracts with 2 local growers to purchase 140,000 lbs of local product at a fraction of the market price. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Tips of the Trade how you can cut costs and buy local <ul><li>Buy in Bulk </li></ul><ul><li>Buy directly from the farmer </li></ul><ul><li>Farmer’s market, Farm stands, Produce auctions </li></ul><ul><li>Buy seasonally </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preserve extra for the winter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Start a garden! </li></ul>
    5. 5. Providing Nutritious Meals for Campus Kitchens Lindsey Palmer, RD DC Central Kitchen
    6. 6. What is a Complete Meal? <ul><li>Components that make up a complete meal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Protein </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Grain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fruit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vegetable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Milk (depending on the program) </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Protein <ul><li>A protein component can be </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beef </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chicken </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fish or seafood </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pork </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lamb </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cheese </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Beans </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>**a quick way to reduce cost make one meal a week vegetarian by using beans or cheese as the protein source** </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Grains <ul><li>A grain can be anything from whole wheat bread to pasta to rice to couscous </li></ul><ul><li>Whole grain products are overall more healthful and satisfying </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The additional fiber keeps you fuller, longer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Whole grains have additional vitamins and minerals not found in processed items </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>**examples of whole grains would be whole wheat bread, brown rice, whole grain pasta and oatmeal** </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Fruit <ul><li>Getting 2-3 servings of fruit per day is important for balanced nutrition but fruit can encompass a multiple of things such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>100% fruit juice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Canned fruit in juice or light syrup </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Frozen fruit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Desserts using minimal fat and sugar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>**local, seasonal fruit is best when available as well as frozen whole fruit** </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Vegetables <ul><li>Similar to fruit, fresh, local, seasonal vegetables tend to be cheaper and pack more nutritional value </li></ul><ul><li>Frozen is a great alternative to fresh </li></ul><ul><li>Canned vegetables are the cheapest option and available all year round but contain high amounts of sodium </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To reduce the sodium content, try rinsing the vegetables before cooking them or letting them sit in water to leech out excess salt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t forget to drain the water before cooking though </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Nutrition Related Programs <ul><li>If your Campus Kitchen is interested in hosting nutrition classes, check with your schools Nutrition Department </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There might be students majoring or minoring in nutrition who could teach classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Also check to see if they have a Dietetic Internship program or Master’s program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On campus nutrition clubs might also be interested in donating time to teach clients about healthy eating </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Topics for Nutrition Education Classes <ul><li>Shopping on a budget </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption </li></ul><ul><li>Food safety </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy snacking and eating on the go </li></ul><ul><li>Getting picky eaters to try new foods </li></ul><ul><li>Cooking demonstrations </li></ul>
    13. 13. Portion Sizes
    14. 14. Portion Sizes
    15. 15. Resources <ul><li>Great resources for nutrition education and handouts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MyPyramid.gov </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>USDA.gov </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eatright.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>**these websites have great ideas for recipes as well as handouts for clients that you can reproduce free of cost** </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Making Healthy Food Taste Good <ul><li>Allison Sosna, Executive Chef of Contract Foods </li></ul>
    17. 17. Making & Marketing Your Healthy Meals <ul><li>Kids, students, and adults all need encouragement on why your healthy meals are good. </li></ul><ul><li>Here are some tips: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sub out sugar for honey </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Art of caramelization- onions and beyond- use them in everything </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Colored yogurt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blended oil and salt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hot sauce; huge flavor enhancer, healthy, cheap </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ dare” them to try it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relate to them: how is this meal going to effect their life? Athletics, dance, music…you are what you eat </li></ul></ul>

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