The Battle of Antietam The Bloodiest One Day Battle of the Civil War Sharpsburg, Maryland September 17, 1862
Bloody Lane
Burnside Bridge   Description:  Taken at the   Burnside Bridge, with the photographer's horse and photo-studio wagon parke...
Dunker Church
Confederate dead along the Hagerstown Pike  Description:  Confederate dead along the west side of Hagerstown Pike. Photo t...
What You Need to Know <ul><li>Further illustrated the ineptness of Union generals </li></ul><ul><li>Technically a stalemat...
Emancipation Proclamation Did it really free the slaves??
According to the Emancipation Proclamation: 1. All slaves in Confederate States were free 2. This did not apply to slaves ...
While this all sounds good it’s much like… The French may no longer drink French wine! What eez dat cray-see Amereecan tah...
In the end… The Emancipation Proclamation only “freed” those slaves in Confederate States that had been liberated by the U...
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The Battle of Antietam

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The Battle of Antietam

  1. 1. The Battle of Antietam The Bloodiest One Day Battle of the Civil War Sharpsburg, Maryland September 17, 1862
  2. 2. Bloody Lane
  3. 3. Burnside Bridge Description: Taken at the Burnside Bridge, with the photographer's horse and photo-studio wagon parked near the east end of the bridge. This would be the same view as many of the attacking soldiers in Burnside's command.
  4. 4. Dunker Church
  5. 5. Confederate dead along the Hagerstown Pike Description: Confederate dead along the west side of Hagerstown Pike. Photo taken about 500 yards north of Dunker Church, looking north, on September 19, 1862. The dirt lane on the left is not Hagerstown Pike, but a path on Miller's Farm. Hagerstown Pike is on the right side of the post-and-rail fence.
  6. 6. What You Need to Know <ul><li>Further illustrated the ineptness of Union generals </li></ul><ul><li>Technically a stalemate, but the Union claimed victory b/c Confeds left first </li></ul><ul><li>This “victory” opened the door for Lincoln to pass the Emancipation Proclamation </li></ul><ul><li>To this day is the bloodiest 1-day battle in American history </li></ul>
  7. 7. Emancipation Proclamation Did it really free the slaves??
  8. 8. According to the Emancipation Proclamation: 1. All slaves in Confederate States were free 2. This did not apply to slaves in border states Sweet! We’re like, so totally free, dude! That boy has no idea what he’s talkin’ about.
  9. 9. While this all sounds good it’s much like… The French may no longer drink French wine! What eez dat cray-see Amereecan tah-keeng aboot?!
  10. 10. In the end… The Emancipation Proclamation only “freed” those slaves in Confederate States that had been liberated by the Union. It also benefited the Union in that it allowed blacks to join the militia and the regular army, thus raising their numbers.

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