<ul><li>Justin M. Bonzo </li></ul><ul><li>Gale Parchoma </li></ul>Centre for Studies in Advanced Learning Technology -  Es...
Harness the wind
The melding of minds <ul><li>Distributed medical education </li></ul><ul><li>Learning communities </li></ul><ul><li>Social...
Grassroots and Social Media “ It’s a story about community and collaboration on a scale never seen before.  It’s about the...
Social Media <ul><li>Interlinking  of people </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging  actively  and  interactively  with content </li><...
Social Media/Formal Learning <ul><li>Many complexities </li></ul><ul><li>Researched from a variety of perspectives </li></...
Social Media/Academy <ul><li>Could it be the very nature of social media that leads to this conflict? </li></ul><ul><li>So...
Social Constructivist Learning <ul><li>Learning requires active participation by the learner.  Learning is not passive. </...
Social Constructivist Learning and Social Media Comparison of social media and social constructivism principles SOCIAL MED...
Conflict and Paradox
Potential areas of conflict <ul><li>Existing hierarchical structure of higher education institutions </li></ul><ul><ul><li...
Potential areas of conflict <ul><li>Accreditation and quality concerns </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accreditation boards: to insu...
Potential areas of conflict <ul><li>Formal and informal learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal learning not traditionally...
<ul><li>Social media is more than technology.  It is a set of collaboration and active participation principles.  </li></u...
<ul><li>Thank You! </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>
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The Paradox of Social Media and Higher Education Institutions

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This paper explores the paradox that occurs between institutional expectations and expectations held by student regarding the use of social media in support of learning in higher education settings. Specifically, the example is given of a disagreement that took place in a recent conversation in a distributed medical education programme in Canada. The current body of research regarding the incongruity of expectations about integrating social media into a higher education institution framework suggests that a widening gap is emerging and that conflict is taking place. The example from Canada exemplifies the difference that exists in people’s understandings and expectations of how social media can be employed for benefit in education. The paper looks at the principles of social media and the potential impact on many of society’s institutions, including government, commerce, media and education. Interestingly, higher education seems to have fallen behind in adopting and adapting to the new social media reality. The key points of social constructivist thinking are then examined with special attention to the following five points: learning requires active participation by the learner; previous experience is important when reinforcing new learning; individual knowledge construction requires a social interaction element; negotiation within the learning environment is essential; and, learning best takes place within a socio-cultural context. These principles are then addressed in relation to the social media principles of active participation, collaboration and that of reflection. Finally, three points are expanded as to potential sources and reasons why conflict may occur when trying to integrate a popular social media perspective into the established higher education setting. These are: existing hierarchical structure of higher education institutions; accreditation and quality concerns; and, formal and informal learning. Social media is more than computer application and programs and the technology behind them it is about transformation. At its core, social media is a collection of ideas about community, openness, flexibility, collaboration, transformation and it is all user-centred. If education and educational institutions can understand and adopt these principles, perhaps there is a chance for significant change in how we teach and learn in formal and informal settings. The challenge is to discover how to facilitate this change.

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  • Interesting discussion. I like what you say at page 8 - the interesting aspect here is:'How would social media impact traditional learning'. At the Social Media Academy we implemented learning community, leverage the tools for the learning process and encourage students to engage in a joint learning process. Unfortunately I couldn't understand why social media and social constructivism is any different (Page 9)

    In regards to the perceived conflict: You see the same conflict in social media already. There are the newbees, the semi experienced, the dangerous 'experts' and then the long time practitioner. I'm practicing social media for 7 years and found that we have not only similar structures but also the knowledge can be seen as a cascade. where you have a foundation, behavioral aspects, best practices etc. and you recognize the two rapidly changing areas are tools and the dynamic that happens through mass adoption.

    Axel
    http://xeesm.com/AxelS
    http://socialmedia-academy.com
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The Paradox of Social Media and Higher Education Institutions

  1. 1. <ul><li>Justin M. Bonzo </li></ul><ul><li>Gale Parchoma </li></ul>Centre for Studies in Advanced Learning Technology - Established in 1992 The Paradox of Social Media and Higher Education Institutions
  2. 2. Harness the wind
  3. 3. The melding of minds <ul><li>Distributed medical education </li></ul><ul><li>Learning communities </li></ul><ul><li>Social media? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Grassroots </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User-directed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Academic set of values </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality assurance </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Grassroots and Social Media “ It’s a story about community and collaboration on a scale never seen before. It’s about the many wresting power from the few and helping one another for nothing and how that will not only change the world, but also change the way the world changes.” --Time Magazine 2006 “ Participatory Web” --Bart Decrem, Founder of Flock
  5. 5. Social Media <ul><li>Interlinking of people </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging actively and interactively with content </li></ul><ul><li>Google as a case study: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Approach usability based on users needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tools built to allow users to customise and use as needed </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Social Media/Formal Learning <ul><li>Many complexities </li></ul><ul><li>Researched from a variety of perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>What are the social media components that can be used to improve learning </li></ul><ul><li>Academy is still struggling with how best to integrate social media </li></ul>
  7. 7. Social Media/Academy <ul><li>Could it be the very nature of social media that leads to this conflict? </li></ul><ul><li>Social media draws into question the role of power structures and relationships. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Social Constructivist Learning <ul><li>Learning requires active participation by the learner. Learning is not passive. </li></ul><ul><li>Previous experience coupled with and compared to new experience results in a reinforcement of /or adaption of that knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Individual knowledge construction requires a social interaction element within the environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation within the learning environment is essential to the development of shared meaning and common knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Learning best takes place within a sociocultural context - a community of practice. </li></ul><ul><li>(Yilmaz, 2008, p. 167): </li></ul>
  9. 9. Social Constructivist Learning and Social Media Comparison of social media and social constructivism principles SOCIAL MEDIA SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIVISM Are dynamic and based on active participation rather than passive viewing Active participation where learning is created based on collaborative effort Information sharing Knowledge is built upon experience Communication Social interaction Information is created by the individual participation and interactivity of the users/Collaboration Shared interaction creates common knowledge Information sharing Learning takes place best in a sociocultural context
  10. 10. Conflict and Paradox
  11. 11. Potential areas of conflict <ul><li>Existing hierarchical structure of higher education institutions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students, support staff, lecturers, faculty… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who are the knowers? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social media – anybody can create, modify and transmit information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Need for negotiations between hierarchical stance of the institution and the openness of social media </li></ul>
  12. 12. Potential areas of conflict <ul><li>Accreditation and quality concerns </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accreditation boards: to insure traditional standards are being met </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social media is non-traditional and may be difficult to measure, assess and accredit </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Standards are set to help prepare students for the future. Social interaction, collaboration, and technology are all key elements to current society. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Potential areas of conflict <ul><li>Formal and informal learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Informal learning not traditionally within the remit of the institution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Twitter </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Social media is more than technology. It is a set of collaboration and active participation principles. </li></ul><ul><li>It is about openness, user-generated content, and flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Potential to change how we learn </li></ul><ul><li>The use of social media is not a technological </li></ul><ul><li>revolution, but rather a social movement.” </li></ul><ul><li>(Downes, 2004, 7) </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Thank You! </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>

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