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Give a Great Tech Talk

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Give a Great Tech Talk

  1. 2. Give a Great Tech Talk Josh Berkus Ian Dees
  2. 3. Table of Contents <ul><li>About Us </li><ul><ul><li>Software Developers
  3. 4. Experienced Speakers
  4. 5. Thought Leaders </li></ul></ul><li>How to Prepare For a Talk </li><ul><ul><li>Finding rehearsal space is important.
  5. 6. Hiring a Professional Designer to Make Sure Your Slides Are GREAT! </li></ul></ul><li>Giving a presentation </li><ul><ul><li>Effective Slide Reading
  6. 7. The Lectern is your Friend </li></ul></ul><li>After Your Talk </li><ul><ul><li>Monetizing Your Content
  7. 8. AdSense
  8. 9. Selling in the Kindle Store </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 10. About Us <ul><li>Josh </li><ul><li>Education </li><ul><li>Brentwood Elementary, Gainesville, FL
  10. 11. Claremont Colleges – Degree in Art! </li></ul><li>Projects </li><ul><li>Postgres, CivicDB, NoiseBridge </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Ian </li><ul><li>Pets </li><ul><li>Cats </li><ul><li>Osiris
  11. 12. Black
  12. 13. Peanut
  13. 14. Harley </li></ul><li>Dogs </li><ul><li>Maybe one day! </li></ul></ul><li>Hobbies </li><ul><li>Lots, just ask! </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 15. About Us <ul><li>Josh </li><ul><li>Education </li><ul><li>Brentwood Elementary, Gainesville, FL
  15. 16. Claremont Colleges – Degree in Art! </li></ul><li>Projects </li><ul><li>Postgres, CivicDB, NoiseBridge </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Ian </li><ul><li>Pets </li><ul><li>Cats </li><ul><li>Osiris
  16. 17. Black
  17. 18. Peanut
  18. 19. Harley </li></ul><li>Dogs </li><ul><li>Maybe one day! </li></ul></ul><li>Hobbies </li><ul><li>Lots, just ask! </li></ul></ul></ul>
  19. 20. Give a Great Tech Talk <ul><li>How to prepare for a talk
  20. 21. Nobody cares about your slides
  21. 22. … but make good ones anyway
  22. 23. Seven Habits of Ineffective Speakers
  23. 24. Audience Interaction 101
  24. 25. Curate your code examples
  25. 26. When the demo crashes
  26. 27. Audience outside the lecture hall </li></ul>
  27. 28. Q&A period at end <ul><li>We'll make sure to have time
  28. 29. Write down your questions
  29. 30. or put them on the wiki: </li><ul><li>http://opensourcebridge.org/2010/wiki /Give_a_Great_Tech_Talk </li></ul></ul>
  30. 31. 1. Preparing for Your Talk Speaker Exercise #1
  31. 32. Know Your Topic <ul><li>You know a lot about
  32. 33. Currently topical
  33. 34. You're enthusiastic about
  34. 35. You can cover in the time allotted </li></ul>
  35. 36. Know Your Timeslot
  36. 37. Basic Timeslots <ul><li>5 Minutes Lightning Talk </li><ul><li>one small topic very briefly </li></ul><li>45 Minutes Regular talk, no Q&A
  37. 38. 1 Hour Regular Talk with Q&A </li><ul><li>one major topic with some depth </li></ul><li>2-3 Hours Tutorial </li><ul><li>entire tool or technology </li></ul></ul>
  38. 39. Basic Timeslots <ul><li>5 Minutes Lightning Talk </li><ul><li>“5 CSS Tags You Didn't Know” </li></ul><li>45 Minutes Regular talk, no Q&A
  39. 40. 1 Hour Regular Talk with Q&A </li><ul><li>“Simple CSS Techniques to Improve Your Site” </li></ul><li>2-3 Hours Tutorial </li><ul><li>“Introduction to CSS-based Web Design” </li></ul></ul>
  40. 41. Use a timer!
  41. 42. Know Your Audience
  42. 43. Who Are They? <ul><li>Professions?
  43. 44. Ages?
  44. 45. Culture?
  45. 46. From where?
  46. 47. Groups? </li></ul>
  47. 48. What do they want? <ul><li>Why are they at the conference?
  48. 49. What is their interest in your topic?
  49. 50. How much do they know already?
  50. 51. What style/format do they expect?
  51. 52. Do they have things in common you can refer to? </li></ul>
  52. 53. OpenSourceBridge “ Analyze query plans to find the “go faster” button”
  53. 54. pgCon “ Find chronic performance issues in your discarded query plans”
  54. 55. SIGCSE “ Discarded plan analysis as a method for teaching query optimization”
  55. 56. 8 Steps for Talk Preparation <ul><li>Create some notes
  56. 57. Come up with a story
  57. 58. Write a script
  58. 59. Work out timings
  59. 60. Create slides
  60. 61. Rehease
  61. 62. Revise
  62. 63. Rehearse again </li></ul>
  63. 65. 5 Basic Stories for Talks <ul><li>From Ignorance to Knowledge
  64. 66. Quest / Solving a Problem
  65. 67. Top-to-Bottom or Bottom-to-Top
  66. 68. Theme & Variations
  67. 69. The Catalog </li></ul>
  68. 72. Rehearse! <ul><li>Do a run-through of the entire presentation </li><ul><li>out loud, standing up </li></ul><li>You'll figure out the timings
  69. 73. You'll discover things which need to be changed
  70. 74. Video helps! </li></ul>
  71. 75. Speaker Exercise #2
  72. 76. 2. Nobody Cares About Your Slides
  73. 77. 3. But Make Good Ones Anyway
  74. 78. You Don't Have To Be Me
  75. 79. One Idea, One Slide
  76. 80. When You Stand, They See Slides When You Move, They See You
  77. 81. On Themes
  78. 82. Do I Have To Use Their Theme?
  79. 83. Light on Dark, or Dark on Light?
  80. 84. Heraldry
  81. 85. Metal vs. Color <ul><li>Metals </li><ul><li>Yellow
  82. 86. White </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Colors </li><ul><li>Black
  83. 87. Blue
  84. 88. Red
  85. 89. Green
  86. 90. Purple
  87. 91. Brown </li></ul></ul>
  88. 93. Point Size Is Your Barometer
  89. 94. 4. The 7 Habits of Highly Ineffective Speakers
  90. 95. 1. Chained To Your Chair (or Podium)
  91. 96. 2. About Me <ul><li>Education </li><ul><li>Brentwood Elementary School, Gainesville Florida
  92. 97. Claremont Colleges – Degree in Art! </li></ul><li>Projects </li><ul><li>PostgreSQL database project
  93. 98. CivicDB
  94. 99. Noisebridge
  95. 100. pgReplay </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Accomplishments </li><ul><li>Founded first company at age of 28
  96. 101. Once shook hands with Esther Dyson
  97. 102. Predicted the dot-com crash
  98. 103. Nobel Prize for Peace for ending vi/emacs flamewar </li></ul></ul>
  99. 104. About Us
  100. 106. 3. Presenting For The Blind
  101. 107. Presenting for the Blind <ul><li>Presenting for the Blind is where you read every line of every slide.
  102. 108. It is extremely boring.
  103. 109. It also gives the audience the impression that you either think that they're illiterate, or that you've never seen these slides before. </li><ul><li>Maybe you haven't. </li></ul><li>You can also read your notes directly off the page.
  104. 110. A monotone is recommended. </li></ul>
  105. 111. 4. Dr. Bronner's School of Slide Design
  106. 119. 5. Bait & Switch
  107. 120. 7 points in description vs. 3 points covered
  108. 121. Working Code & Demo vs. Just Slides
  109. 122. Expert Level vs. Beginner Level
  110. 123. Beginner Level vs. Expert Level
  111. 124. In-depth Technical vs. Brochureware
  112. 126. Grab Bag Presenting <ul><li>Including random crap which has nothing to do with the main topic of the presentation. </li><ul><li>(often at the behest of your employer) </li></ul></ul>“ Hey, Josh has a presentation at Open Source Bridge! We can get him to include a slide about Glassfish!”
  113. 127. 6. Time is an Illusion
  114. 128. You don't need to watch the clock <ul><li>Your audience will wait for you! </li><ul><li>No matter how long it takes. </li></ul><li>Don't worry about pacing
  115. 129. Don't worry about rehearsing
  116. 130. Don't worry about the next speaker
  117. 131. Don't worry about lunch </li></ul>
  118. 132. 7. Panic
  119. 133. Six Stages of Panic <ul><li>Apologize to the audience
  120. 134. Keep trying to get the demo or slides to work
  121. 135. Apologize to the audience again
  122. 136. Sit down and start hacking on your laptop to get it to work
  123. 137. Apologize some more
  124. 138. End the session early </li></ul>
  125. 139. 7 Ineffective Habits <ul><li>Chained to chair/podium
  126. 140. About Me/Us
  127. 141. Presenting for the Blind
  128. 142. Too Much Crap on Each Slide
  129. 143. Bait & Switch
  130. 144. Lose Track of Time
  131. 145. Panic </li></ul>
  132. 146. 7 Effective Habits <ul><li>Move Around
  133. 147. Get Right Into the Talk
  134. 148. Don't Read
  135. 149. Sparse, Well-Designed Slides
  136. 150. Stick to the Topic
  137. 151. Pace Yourself and Track Time </li></ul>
  138. 154. 5. Audience Interaction 101
  139. 155. Eye Contact
  140. 156. Body Language
  141. 157. Asking for a Response <ul><li>Wakes the audience up
  142. 158. Ask about them </li><ul><li>change your talk emphasis </li></ul><li>Find out if you're boring them </li><ul><li>critical in after-lunch and end-of-day spots </li></ul></ul>
  143. 159. Jokes <ul><li>Even better way to wake up the audience </li><ul><li>and relax them </li></ul><li>Hard to get right </li><ul><li>many jokes fall flat
  144. 160. some can offend people </li></ul><li>Investigate current affairs for your audience
  145. 161. Beta-test your jokes </li></ul>
  146. 162. Taking Questions <ul><li>Throughout talk
  147. 163. End of each section
  148. 164. End of the talk
  149. 165. … just let audience know! </li></ul>
  150. 166. Questions you can't answer
  151. 167. That Guy in The Third Row
  152. 168. Jesus in the Audience
  153. 169. Audience Participation <ul><li>Small-medium audiences
  154. 170. Choose the right person
  155. 171. Plan it carefully </li><ul><li>limited scope
  156. 172. timing
  157. 173. materials </li></ul><li>Be ready to abort & do something else </li></ul>
  158. 174. 6. Curate Your Code Examples
  159. 175. def snippetize (self): with ZipFile( 'all.key' ) as original: with ZipFile( 'out.key' , 'w' ) as updated: for item in original.filelist: if item.filename ! = 'index.apxl' : contents = original.read(item.filename) updated.writestr(item, contents) raw = original.read( 'index.apxl' ) # Find snippets in the source tree doc = minidom.parseString(raw) pattern = '//sf:shape[starts-with(@sf:href,'http://localhost/')]' strip = 'http://localhost/' finder = Finder(doc, pattern, strip)
  160. 176. # Find snippets in the source tree doc = minidom.parseString(raw) pattern = &quot;//sf:shape[starts-with(&quot; &quot;@sf:href,'http://localhost/')]&quot; strip = &quot;http://localhost/&quot; finder = Finder(doc, pattern, strip)
  161. 177. Does That Mean I Have To Rewrite All My Examples?
  162. 178. YES!
  163. 179. Using TextMate? <ul><li>Slush & Poppies (light)
  164. 180. Blackboard (dark)
  165. 181. Inconsolata / Consolas
  166. 182. Bundles ‣ TextMate ‣ Create HTML ... </li></ul>
  167. 183. Using Something Else? <ul><li>Convert to HTML with http://pygments.org
  168. 184. Copy and paste from browser </li></ul>
  169. 185. Lots of Slides? <ul><li>Auto-update your snippets
  170. 186. http://github.com/undees/snippetize </li></ul>
  171. 187. Demo
  172. 188. Start With the Big Three <ul><li>“Create your slides in some standard slide software like Keynote, OpenOffice Impress or PowerPoint.”
  173. 189. Andy Lester </li></ul>
  174. 190. But If You're Ready to Move On
  175. 191. Showoff <ul><li>Code and shell sessions
  176. 192. http://github.com/schacon/showoff </li></ul>
  177. 193. There's Always More Code!
  178. 194. 7. When Your Demo Crashes
  179. 195. Your demo will crash
  180. 196. 3 things to count on <ul><li>Conference internet will fail … during your talk
  181. 197. The hardware will fail … in unprecedented ways
  182. 198. The software will fail … in unreproduceable ways </li></ul>
  183. 199. 7 ways to avoid demo failure <ul><li>Be unambitious
  184. 200. Test the hardware
  185. 201. Drill demo repeatedly
  186. 202. Rewindable VMs
  187. 203. Fake your demo
  188. 204. Alternative demo
  189. 205. Never do “cascading” demos </li></ul>
  190. 206. Fake your demos <ul><li>screenshots
  191. 207. video
  192. 208. shell history
  193. 209. recorded shell sessions (ttyrec)
  194. 210. interactive shell scripts (IO::prompt) </li></ul>
  195. 211. 8. The Audience Outside the Lecture Hall
  196. 212. Speaker Notes Who are they for? Not the speaker!
  197. 213. Speaker Notes If the speaker notes for this slide were to include literally everything I plan on saying, like what you see here on the slide, then it would be way too much text for that tiny little text window at the bottom of the screen.
  198. 214. Audio Audio or notes; you don't need both
  199. 215. Sharing
  200. 216. SlideShare http://www.slideshare.net/faqs/slidecast
  201. 217. YouTube Export slides + audio to movie
  202. 218. Your Podcast Host Wiki for “Enhanced Podcast”
  203. 219. More Information <ul><li>Josh Berkus </li><ul><li>[email_address]
  204. 220. www.pgexperts.com </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Links on OSB Wiki: </li><ul><li>http://opensourcebridge.org/2010/wiki /Give_a_Great_Tech_Talk </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ian Dees </li><ul><li>[email_address]
  205. 221. ian.dees.name </li></ul></ul>This presentation copyright 2010 Josh Berkusa and Ian Dees, licensed for distribution under the Creative Commons Share-Alike License, except for photos, most of which were stolen from other people's websites via images.google.com, and Sun presentations, the copyright on which is available at low, low rates.

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