Typhoons in The Philippines

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Typhoons in The Philippines

  1. 1. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 1 12/12/13
  2. 2. Group Genesis Members: 1. Alderite Meeko A. 2. Avila Marvin A. 3. Balondo Rhedel E. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 2 12/12/13
  3. 3. Dear Readers, This power point presentation has been designed how to learn what to do when you are hit by this disaster. In this power point presentation you will find the the disaster that struck the world. In this power point you’ll find the study, history and the plan how to do if you are hit by this disaster. This power point contains the study, history and circumstances happens in earth in the past years until now. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 3 12/12/13
  4. 4. Greetings On Readers, The purpose of my presentation is to introduce the importance of preparedness in case of severe accidents impacting your area and what would make when it hits your area. And this disaster is thypoon .Thypoon is not a normal calamity it can destroy many houses farms etc. The one you will see in this presentation are examples only. It took only internet. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 4 12/12/13
  5. 5. Page CHAPTER 1 *History Of Thypoon In The Philippines - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6 – 9 CHAPTER 2 *Gathered Information - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 10 – 16 CHAPTER 3 *Safety Tips - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - *Concluison - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - *References - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Tyhpoon In The Philippines 5 17 – 18 19 20 - 21 12/12/13
  6. 6. CHAPTER 1 HISTORY OF TYPHOON IN THE PHILIPPINES Since the middle of the 20th Century, American forecasters have named tropical storms after people, originally using only female names.[10] Philippine forecasters from the now-PAGASA started assigning Filipino names to storms in 1963 following the American practice, using names of people in alphabetical order, from A to Z.[10] Beginning in January 2000, the World Meteorological Organization"s Typhoon Committee began assigning names to storms nominated by the 14 Asian countries who are members with each country getting 2 to 3 a year.[10] These names, unlike the American and Filipino traditions, are not names for people exclusively but include flowers, animals, food, etc. and they are not in alphabetical order by name but rather in alphabetical order by the country that nominated the name.[10] After January 2000, Filipino forecasters continued their tradition of naming storms that enter the Philippines Area of Responsibility and so there are often two names for each storm, the PAGASA name and the so-called "international name". The term bagyo, a Filipino word meaning typhoon arose after a 1911 storm in the city of Baguio had a record rainfall of 46 inches within a 24-hour period. In the Philippines, tropical cyclones (typhoons) are called bagyo. Tropical cyclones entering the Philippine Area of Responsibility are given a local name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), which also raises public storm signal warnings as deemed necessary. Around 19 tropical cyclones or storms enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility in a typical year and of these usually 6 to 9 make landfall. The deadliest tropical cyclone to impact the Philippines was Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) which became the strongest landfalling tropical cyclone ever recorded, killing thousands of people as it passed over the country in November 2013. The wettest known tropical cyclone to impact the archipelago was the July 14–18, 1911 cyclone which dropped over 2,210 millimetres (87 in) of rainfall within a 3-day, 15hour period in Baguio City. Tropical cyclones usually account for at least 30 percent of the annual rainfall in the northern Philippines while being responsible for less than 10 percent of the annual rainfall in the southern islands. The Philippines is the most-exposed large country in the world to tropical cyclones, and it has even affected settlement patterns in the northern islands; for example, the eastern coast of Luzon is very sparsely populated. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 6 12/12/13
  7. 7. The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) releases tropical cyclone warnings in the form of Public Storm Warning Signals.[3] An area having a storm signal may be under: PSWS #1 - Tropical cyclone winds of 30 km/h (19 mph) to 60 km/h (37 mph) are expected within the next 36 hours. (Note: If a tropical cyclone forms very close to the area, then a shorter lead time is seen on the warning bulletin.) PSWS #2 - Tropical cyclone winds of 60 km/h (37 mph) to 100 km/h (62 mph) are expected within the next 24 hours. PSWS #3 - Tropical cyclone winds of 100 km/h (62 mph) to 185 km/h (115 mph) are expected within the next 18 hours. PSWS #4 - Tropical cyclone winds of greater than 185 km/h (115 mph) are expected within 12 hours. These storm signals are usually raised when an area (in the Philippines only) is about to be hit by a tropical cyclone. As a tropical cyclone gains strength and/or gets nearer to an area having a storm signal, the warning may be upgraded to a higher one in that particular area (e.g. a signal No. 1 warning for an area may be increased to signal #3). Conversely, as a tropical cyclone weakens and/or gets farther to an area, it may be downgraded to a lower signal or may be lifted (that is, an area will have no storm signal). Classes for Preschool are canceled when Signal No. 1 is in effect. Elementary and High School classes and below are cancelled under Signal No. 2 and classes for Colleges and Universities and below are cancelled under Signal No. 3 and Signal No. 4. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 7 12/12/13
  8. 8. RECENT TYHPOONS THAT HITS PHILIPPINES NAME *Yoling SUSTAINED WINDS 150 km/h (90 mph) DATE Nov.14 - 22 1970 AREAS AFFECTED Luzon DEATHS 611 DAMAGE 460 Million May 10 – 28 1976 Luzon 374 1.16 billion *Didang 150 km/h (90 mph) April 16 – 22 1978 Visayas, Southern Luzon 111 24.5 million *Atang 150 km/h (90 mph) *Nitang 165 km/h (105 mph) Aug.26 – Sept. 6 1984 Visayas, Northern Mindanao 1,363 4.1 billion Visayas, Southern Luzon 895 1.9 billion *Undang 195 km/h (120 mph) Oct.30 – Nov.8 1984 Southern Luzon, Eastern Visayas 94 2.07 billion *Herming 205 km/h (125 mph) Aug.8 – 17 1987 Southern Luzon 979 1.12 billion *Sisang 165 km/h (105 mph) Nov.16 – 30 1987 Eastern Visayas, Southern Luzon 217 2.77 billion *Yoning 150 km/h (90  mph) Nov.3 – 12 1988 Luzon 157 5.64 billion *Unsang 140 km/h (85  mph) Oct.20 – 28 1988 Visayas 748 10.8 billion *Ruping 280 km/h (175 mph) Nov.5 – 18 1990 85 km/h (50 mph) Nov.1 – 8 1991 Visayas 5,100 1.05 billion *Uring Oct.25 – Nov.7 1995 Southern Luzon 936 10.8 billion *Rosing 285 km/h (180 mph) Visayas, Luzon 303 6.79 billion *Loleng 190 km/h (120 mph) Oct.15 – 24 1998 150 km/h (90 mph) Nov.14 – 26 2004 Luzon 68 853 million *Unding Nov.22 2004 Luzon 29 250 million *Violeta 65 km/h (40 mph) Nov27 – 30 2004 Luzon 775 669 million *Winnie 50 km/h (35 mph) Luzon, Visayas 228 6.4 billion *Milenyo 140 km/h (80 mph) Sept.25 – 29 2006 Luzon, Visayas 734 5.08 billion *Reming 195 km/h (120 mph) Nov.28 – Dec. 2 2006 May 14 – 20 2008 Luzon 61 12/12/13 4.71 billion *Cosme 110 km/h (70 mph) 8 Tyhpoon In The Philippines Luzon, Visayas 557 13.5 billion *Frank 160 km/h (100 mph) June 18 – 23 2008
  9. 9. NAME SUSTAINED WINDS DATE AREAS AFFECTED DEATHS DAMAGE Luzon 464 11 billion *Ondoy 105 km/h (60 mph) Sept.24 – 28 2009 *Pepeng 195 km/h (120 mph) Sept.30-Oct.10 2009 Eastern Visayas, Luzon 465 27.3 billion 230 km/h (145 mph) Oct.12 – 24 2010 Luzon 26 8.22 billion *Juan *Bebeng 85 km/h (50 mph) May 5 – 12 2011 N-E. Luzon, Eastern Visayas 35 2.25 billion *Juaning 95 km/h (60 mph) July 24 – 31 2011 Eastern Visayas,N. Luzon 77 4.44 billion 36 2.09 billion *Mina 195 km/h (115 mph) Aug. 21 – 31 2011 85 15.6 billion *Pedring 140 km/h (85 mph) Sept.23 – 30 2011 *Sendong 75 km/h (45 mph) Dec. 13 - 19 2011 N. Mindanao,C. Visayas 1,268 2.07 billion *Pablo 185 km/h (115 mph) Nov.25 – Dec. 9 2012 Mindanao,Visayas,Luzon 1,901 42.2 billion 11 1.42 billion *Labuyo 195 km/h (120 mph) Aug. 8 – 18 2013 Northeastern Luzon Central Luzon 15 3.29 billion *Santi 140 km/h (85 mph) Oct. 8 – 16 2013 Visayas, Mindoro 5,796 Still Counting *Yolanda 230 km/h (145 mph) Nov. 3 – 11 2013 35.2 billion Tyhpoon In The Philippines 9 12/12/13
  10. 10. CHAPTER 2 Tyhpoon In The Philippines 10 12/12/13
  11. 11. A Typhoon is a Mature tropical cyclone that develops in the northwest part of the Pacific Ocean between 180 degrees and 100 degrees east. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 11 12/12/13
  12. 12. To form a Typhoon, you need these conditions: A warm sea surface, Atmospheric Instability, High humidity in the lower to middle levels of the troposphere, enough coriolis force to develop a low pressure center, a pre-existing low level focus or disturbance, a low vertical wind shear. While these conditions are necessary they DO NOT GUARUNTEE a Typhoon. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 12 12/12/13
  13. 13. Typhoons if they are formed out in the ocean and stay there the y can last from a few days to a few weeks until they reach land. And it takes them a couple weeks to form. Typhoon Zeb (1998) over the western North Pacific shows a disc-like rotating cloud mass typical of tropical cyclones. The image was originally captured by the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS12/12/13 13 Tyhpoon In The Philippines 5) of Japan Meteoroogical Agency (JMA). Anyone wishing to further disseminate the satellite image should seek permission from JMA, 1-3-4 Ote-machi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
  14. 14. They UsUally happen from JUne ThroUgh november. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 14 12/12/13
  15. 15. Typhoons can destroy homes and cause million and millions of dollars in damage depending on the category. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 15 12/12/13
  16. 16. typhoons are large and sometimes intensely violent storm systems. In meteorological terms, they are tropical cyclones that have maximum sustained winds of at least 120 km/h (75 mph). Atlantic and eastern Pacific storms are called hurricanes, from the West Indian huracan ("big wind"), whereas western Pacific storms are called typhoons, from the Chinese taifun, "great wind." 16 Tyhpoon In The Philippines 12/12/13
  17. 17. CHAPTER 3 SAFETY TIPS DURING THYPOON 1. Keep your radio on and listen to the latest weather bulletin and announcements. 2. Don’t pay attention to rumors. 3. Stay away from low-lying beaches or other locations which may be swept away by high tides or storm waves. If your only  passage to high ground is over a road likely to be under water during a severe storm, then leave early. 4. If your house can’t be affected by a high tide and is well-built or anchored, then it is probably the best place to be during a storm. 5. Board up and securely fasten windows. Makeshift boarding may do more harm than good. Whenever applicable, anchor the house with strong wires. 6. Get extra food, particularly those that don’t need to be cooked and are easy to prepare. Remember that electric power may be cut off. 7. If emergency cooking facilities are necessary, be sure they work. 8. Store water as water service may be cut off. 9. Always keep a flashlight handy. 10. Check everything that may be blown away or turn loose. Flying objects are dangerous during typhoons. 11. If the eye of the typhoon has passed your house, there may be a lull lasting for a few minutes to half an hour. Stay in a safe place. Make emergency repairs during the lull if necessary. But remember that the wind will return suddenly from the opposite direction with even greater violence. 12. Be calm. Your ability to handle an emergency will inspire others and help them. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 17 12/12/13
  18. 18. 12 Safety Tips During Super Typhoon Like Yolanda 1. Don't leave the house unless absolutely necessary. Children should be prohibited from playing in the rain or flood to prevent contracting leptospirosis and other waterborne diseases. 2. With Yolanda's strong winds, those outdoors should watch out for flying objects or debris. 3. Do not use gas or electrical appliances that have been flooded. 4. Protect food and water from contaminants by keeping them in sealed containers. Food should be well-cooked. 5. To ensure that water is safe for drinking, boil it for 3 minutes or chlorinate it.  6. Stay away from places that will likely be inundated by rising water or waves such as beaches and riverbanks. Stay away from landslide-prone areas. 7. When evacuation is necessary, switch off your home's main power supply, place appliances and belongings on higher locations and close windows before leaving.  8.  Wear warm and dry clothing. 9. Consult a doctor immediately once you or any member of your household shows symptoms of disease to prevent infecting others in the evacuation center. Common diseases or infections that spread in evacuation centers are coughs and colds, acute gastroenteritis, skin and eye infections, measles, dengue, leptospirosis and hepatitis A. 10. Properly dispose of all waste. 11.  Wash your hands before and after eating and using the toilet. 12. Stay away from hanging wires and unstable structures (damaged houses, bridges, ports near rough waters, etc). Tyhpoon In The Philippines 18 12/12/13
  19. 19. Now, to sum up my presentation the main points of my presentation is about Thypoon . Tyhpoon is a disaster that carries many water that can destroy many homes . In this presentation you will find typoons that hits Philippines and killed many People. In this presentation you will see how to do if your place was hit by thypoon. In conclusion, my recommendations are : your mind should be active in calamities you have to be ready if theres any calamities written in this conlusion. Follow the written tips here in this presentation for your safety. Tyhpoon In The Philippines 19 12/12/13
  20. 20. REFERENCES Jump up to: Glossary of Meteorology. Baguio. Retrieved on 2008-06-11. •Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Hurricane Research Division. "Frequently Asked Questions: What are the upcoming tropical cyclone names?". NOAA. Retrieved 2006-12-11. •Republic of the Philippines. Department of Science and Technology. Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. (n.d.). The Modified Philippine Public Storm Warning Signals. Retrieved February 24, 2011. •Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Appendix B: Characteristics of Tropical Cyclones Affecting the Philippine Islands (Shoemaker 1991). Retrieved on 2008-04-20. •Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA). (January 2009). Member Report to the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee, 41st Session. Retrieved 2009-12-17. •Typhoon Haiyan death toll rises over 5,000. BBC. 2013. •J. L. H. Paulhaus (1973). World Meteorological Organization Operational Hydrology Report No. 1: Manual For Estimation of Probable Maximum Precipitation. World Meteorological Organization. p. 178. •English, Fr. Leo James (2004, 19th printing), Tagalog-English Dictionary, Manila: Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, p. 117, ISBN 971-08-4357-5 •Philippine Center for Language Study; Jean Donald Bowen (1965), Jean Donald Bowen, ed., Beginning Tagalog: a course for speakers of English (10 ed.), University of California Press, p. 349, ISBN 978-0-520-00156-5 •"Names". Typhoon2000.com. David Michael V. Padua. Retrieved 9 November 2013. •Ricardo García-Herrera, Pedro Ribera, Emiliano Hernández and Luis Gimeno (2003-09-26). "Typhoons in the Philippine Islands, 1566-1900". David V. Padua. p. 40. Retrieved 2010-04-13. •Joint Typhoon Warning Center (2009). "Member Report Republic of the Philippines". Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Adminastration. World Meteorological Organization. Retrieved 2010-04-14. •Joint Typhoon Warning Center (1959). "1958". United States Navy. •Colleen A. Sexton (2006). Philippines in Pictures. Twenty-First Century Books. ISBN 978-0-8225-2677-3. Retrieved 2008-11-01. •Edward B. Rodgers, Robert F. Adler, and Harold F. Pierce. Satellite-measured rainfall across the Pacific Ocean and tropical cyclone contribution to the total. Retrieved 2008-11-25. •Ten Worst Typhoons of the Philippines (A Summary) •Leoncio A. Amadore, PhD Socio-Economic Impacts of Extreme Climatic Events in the Philippines. Retrieved on 2007-02-25. 12/12/13 20 Tyhpoon In The Philippines
  21. 21. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Pedro Ribera, Ricardo Garcia-Herrera and Luis Gimeno (July 2008). "Historical deadly typhoons in the Philippines". Weather (Royal Meteorological Society) 63 (7): 196. http://www.ndrrmc.gov.ph/attachments/article/835/29%20Update.pdf "SitRep No. 35 Effects of Typhoon "Yolanda" (Haiyan)" (PDF). National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. November 22, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2013. "Situation report no.50 on Typhoon Ondoy (Ketsana) and Typhoon Pepeng (Parma)". Philippine National Disaster Coordinating Council. 2009-11-17. Retrieved 2010-05-14. As Typhoon Nesat departs, Philippines tallies the damage | MNN - Mother Nature Network http://210.185.184.53/ndccWeb/images/ndccWeb/ndcc_update/TC_FRANK/sitrep33_tyfrank.pdf "Destructive typhoons 1970-2003“.National Disaster Coordinating Council. 2009-05-01. Archived from the original on 2004-10-28. Retrieved 2010-05-13. "Typhoon Juan Update“. NDRRMC (formerly NDCC). 2010-10-23. Retrieved 2010-10-23. Leoncio A. Amadore, Ph.D. Socio-Economic Impacts of Extreme Climatic Events in the Philippines. Retrieved on 2007-02-25. Padgett, Gary; Kevin Boyle, Huang Chunliang, and Simon Clarke (2006-10-26). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary June 2004". Australian Severe Weather Index. Jimmy Deguara. Retrieved 2007-01-13. Steve Lang (May 7, 2009). "Hurricane Season 2009: Kujira (Western Pacific Ocean)". NASA. Retrieved December 23, 2011. Narciso O. Itoralba (December 1981). Annual Tropical Cyclone Report 1977. Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. p. 65. Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Typhoon Elaine. Retrieved on 2007-02-25. "Annual Tropical Cyclone Report: Bess“ (PDF). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. United States Navy. 1975. pp. 39–40. Retrieved May 2, 2013. "JTWC Annual tropical cyclone report: 2003". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 2004. Retrieved 2010-01-22. http://hublinker.hubpages.com/hub/Safety-Precautions-during-Typhoons http://www.rappler.com/nation/43248-safety-health-tips-typhoon Tyhpoon In The Philippines 21 12/12/13

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