Professional Learning Communities

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  • Awards listed in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 CI and PLCs – take one more step towards greatness
  • Description of your culture
  • Collective wisdom
  • As opposed to marathon running (all running toward the same goal – in isolation)
  • Plc pg 43 Wright Family
  • As opposed to marathon running (all running toward the same goal – in isolation) let’s try it The Wright Family
  • Collective understandings
  • Decide together essential learning, and levels of proficiency, mastery for all commitment Do not go back, close our door and ignore team decisions - in favor of favorite projects
  • NASCAR example Blink of an eye
  • Coffee shop story
  • We accept high levels of learning for all students as the fundamental purpose of our school, and therefore are willing to examine all practices in light of their impact on learning.
  • 35
  • Deconstruct Backwards Design, Scaffold
  • Professional Learning Communities

    1. 1. Professional Learning Community Overview Dunlap School District A Consistently High Performing District March - 2010 Becky Martin School Improvement Consultant Cedar Rapids, IA [email_address]
    2. 2. Dunlap High Performing School District <ul><li>October 2009 – Chicago Sun-Times Rankings: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DHS Ranked #19 in the State of Illinois </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>WW Ranked #21 in the State of Illinois </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DMS Ranked #48 in the State of Illinois </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DVMS Ranked #51 in the State of Illinois </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DGS Ranked #88 in the State of Illinois </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BES Ranked #96 in the State of Illinois </li></ul></ul><ul><li>September 2009 – A+ Award </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Top 5% of School Districts in Illinois </li></ul></ul><ul><li>February 2009 – Academic Excellence Award </li></ul>
    3. 3. Changing the Focus <ul><li>Old Focus </li></ul><ul><li>Every student can learn </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Isolation </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment OF learning (Summative) </li></ul><ul><li>Select & Sort Students </li></ul><ul><li>Failure is an option </li></ul><ul><li>New Focus </li></ul><ul><li>Every student will learn </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment FOR learning (Formative) </li></ul><ul><li>Pyramid of Intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Failure is not and option </li></ul>
    4. 4. Professional Learning Communities Results Focus on Learning Collaboration Continuous Improvement Strategic Plan
    5. 5. PLC Mission: High Levels of Learning for All Students <ul><li>Fundamental Assumptions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Educators believe all student are capable of high levels of learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Educators assume the responsibility for all students achieving at high levels </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. PLC Team Structures <ul><li>Grade level team </li></ul><ul><li>Course alike teams </li></ul><ul><li>Vertical teams </li></ul><ul><li>Interdisciplinary teams with an overarching curriculum goal </li></ul><ul><li>District teams </li></ul>
    7. 7. The Foundation of Professional Learning Communities <ul><li>Three Big Ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Four Learning Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Six Characteristics </li></ul>
    8. 8. Big Ideas of PLC <ul><li>Learning as the fundamental purpose of our school </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivate a collaborative culture through development of high-performing teams. </li></ul><ul><li>Assess our effectiveness on the basis of results rather than intentions. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Three Big Ideas <ul><li>Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul>Richard & Rebecca DuFour & www.allthingsplc.info
    10. 10. <ul><li>Creating a collaborative culture is the single most important factor for successful school improvement initiatives and the first order of business for those seeking to enhance the effectiveness of their school. </li></ul><ul><li>-Eastwood & Seashore-Louis (1992) </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results Collaboration
    11. 11. <ul><li>We are committed to working </li></ul><ul><li>together to achieve our collective </li></ul><ul><li>purpose. We cultivate a </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Culture through </li></ul><ul><li>development of high-performing </li></ul><ul><li>teams. </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    12. 12. What is Collaboration? <ul><li>A systematic process in which we work together, interdependently , to analyze and impact professional practice in order to improve out individual and collective results. </li></ul><ul><li>- DuFour, DuFour, & Eaker (2002 ) </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    13. 13. Mark Buehrle White Sox Perfect Game July 23, 2009
    14. 19. <ul><li>We are committed to working </li></ul><ul><li>together to achieve our collective </li></ul><ul><li>purpose. We cultivate a </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Culture through </li></ul><ul><li>development of high-performing </li></ul><ul><li>teams. </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    15. 20. Why Collaborate <ul><li>Gains in student achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Higher quality solutions to problems </li></ul><ul><li>Increased confidence among all staff </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers able to support one another's strengths and accommodate weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to test new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>More support for new teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Expanded pool of ideas, material, methods </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>-Judith Warren Little (1990) </li></ul></ul></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    16. 21. <ul><li>… the shared understanding by the entire staff that both the staff and the individuals within the staff are reliable and that they can be counted on to do what they say they will do. </li></ul>Trust has been defined as….. Learning – Collaboration - Results
    17. 22. Collective Responsibility <ul><li>The best organizations are places where everyone has permission, or better yet, the responsibility to gather and act on quantitative data, and to help everyone else learn what they know. </li></ul><ul><li>- Pfeffer & Sutton (2006) </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    18. 23. Three Big Ideas <ul><li>Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul>
    19. 24. <ul><li>We accept learning as the fundamental purpose of our school and therefore are willing to examine all practices in light of their impact on learning. </li></ul>Learning Learning – Collaboration - Results
    20. 25. Learning Questions <ul><li>What do we want each students to know or be able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we know they have learned? What evidence do we have of the learning? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we respond when students don’t learn or struggle? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we respond to those who have already learned? </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    21. 26. Student Questions <ul><li>What do I need to know ? </li></ul><ul><li>Where am I now? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I get there? </li></ul><ul><li>What happens if I struggle or fail? </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    22. 27. Focus on Learning <ul><li>To truly reform American education we must abandon he long-standing assumption that the central activity of education is teaching and reorient all policy making and activities around a new benchmark: student learning . </li></ul><ul><li>- Edward Fiske (1992) </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    23. 28. Learning Questions <ul><li>What do we want each students to know or be able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we know they have learned? What evidence do we have of the learning? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we respond when students don’t learn or struggle? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we respond to those who have already learned? </li></ul>Standards - Benchmarks Student Learning Expectations Learning – Collaboration - Results
    24. 29. Focus on Learning <ul><li>The ultimate purpose of schools is to ensure high levels of learning for ALL students. </li></ul><ul><li>If this is true , then schools will : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clarify what each student is expected to learn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitor each student’s learning on a timely basis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create systems to ensure students receive additional time and support if they are not learning </li></ul></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    25. 30. Clear Learning Targets <ul><li>In student friendly language </li></ul>
    26. 31. When students know what they are learning , their performance, on average, has been shown to be 27 percentile points higher than students who do not know what they are learning. What are the learning targets?
    27. 32. The objective is…. I need to learn….. I have to complete this by…… Robert J. Marzano
    28. 33. Today Read Chapter 2 in .. Finish Adverb assignment… Work on myth.. Activities/Assignments Robert J. Marzano
    29. 34. As a result of what we do today, you will be able to demonstrate that you: Understand the technique of foreshadowing in mysteries. Can revise writing to improve use of descriptive adverbs. Learning Goals Robert J. Marzano
    30. 35. <ul><li>Do the odd numbered problems on pages 44 & 45. Show your work </li></ul><ul><li>Unit review - Define four components of a culture. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand the relationship between fractions and decimals. </li></ul><ul><li>Using 3 resources - write a report on Charles Dickens. </li></ul><ul><li>Practice 5 new words at home. </li></ul><ul><li>Design menu’s that include a balance of foods from the food pyramid. One day for a teen-ager, one day for a toddler and one day for an adult. </li></ul>Activities/Assignments or Learning Goals????? <ul><li>Demonstrate your understanding of exponents. </li></ul><ul><li>Know the role culture plays in incidents of cooperation and conflict in the present day world . </li></ul><ul><li>Uses strategies to gather and record information for research topics. </li></ul><ul><li>Knows nutritional guidelines to be considered for food and meal planning </li></ul><ul><li>Asks and answers questions using appropriate terms </li></ul>
    31. 36. What is your classroom focus? <ul><li>Is this a Paradigm Shift? </li></ul>Learning OR Points & Assignments
    32. 37. Learning Expectations as SMART Goals <ul><li>Specific </li></ul><ul><li>Measurable </li></ul><ul><li>Attainable </li></ul><ul><li>Results-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Time-bound </li></ul>
    33. 38. Grade Level/Course Expectations <ul><li>Intended Use for Teachers : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The intended curriculum. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They provide direction to teachers in relation to the intended and enacted curriculum. </li></ul></ul>What do we want all students to know or be able to do?
    34. 39. SMART Targets <ul><li>Intended Use for Students : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Answers the student questions: </li></ul></ul>What do I need to know or be able to do? How am I doing?
    35. 40. SMART Targets <ul><li>Intended Use for Parents : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to connect parents to the Learning Expectations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Answers the question: </li></ul></ul>Where is my child on the continuum of learning?
    36. 41. Critical Learning Questions <ul><li>What do we want each students to learn, know or be able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we know they have learned? What evidence do we have of the learning? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we respond when students don’t learn or struggle? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we respond to those who have already learned? </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results In-Process Measures Formative Assessment
    37. 42. Classroom Two Uses of Assessment <ul><li>SUMMATIVE </li></ul><ul><li>Assessments OF Learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How much have students learned as of a particular point in time? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>FORMATIVE </li></ul><ul><li>Assessments FOR Learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How can we use assessment information to help students learn more? </li></ul></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    38. 43. Assessment Purpose: Assess to meet whose needs? Learning – Collaboration - Results
    39. 44. All those activities undertaken by teachers and by their students [that] provide information to be used as FEEDBACK to modify the teaching and learning activities in which they are engaged. --Black & Wiliam, 1998 FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Learning – Collaboration - Results
    40. 45. Criteria for Success <ul><li>Define Proficiency – Mastery </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is mastery? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What does it look like? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How will I know? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Agreed upon by staff </li></ul><ul><li>Criteria provided for students </li></ul>
    41. 46. Clean refrigerator 4 Entire refrigerator is sparkling and smells clean. All items are fresh, in proper containers (original or Tupperware, with lids), and organized into categories 3 Refrigerator is generally wiped clean. All items are relatively fresh, in some type of container (some Tupperware lids are missing or don’t fit) and are sitting upright Source: Robert Marzano
    42. 47. 2 Some of the shelves are wiped clean, although there are some crusty spots. There are some suspicious smells. Items are in containers, but there seems to be some green stuff growing in some of the Tupperware 1 Items stick to the shelves when they are picked up. The smells linger long after the refrigerator door is closed. Several items need to be thrown out— Tupperware and all Source: Robert Marzano
    43. 48. Marzano’s Rubric Design Source: Robert Marzano 0 1 2 The student’s responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes (THAT WERE EXPLICITLY TAUGHT) 3 4
    44. 49. Source: Robert Marzano 0 1 The student’s responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 2 The student’s responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 3 4
    45. 50. Source: Robert Marzano 0 The student provides responses that indicate a distinct lack of understanding of the knowledge. However, with help, the student demonstrates partial understanding of some of the knowledge. 1 The student’s responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 2 The student’s responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 3 4
    46. 51. Source: Robert Marzano The student provides little or no response. Even with help the student does not exhibit a partial understanding of the knowledge. 0 The student provides responses that indicate a distinct lack of understanding of the knowledge. However, with help, the student demonstrates partial understanding of some of the knowledge. 1 The student’s responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 2 The student’s responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 3 4
    47. 52. Source: Robert Marzano The student provides little or no response. Even with help the student does not exhibit a partial understanding of the knowledge. 0 The student provides responses that indicate a distinct lack of understanding of the knowledge. However, with help, the student demonstrates partial understanding of some of the knowledge. 1 The student’s responses indicate major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes; however they do not indicate major errors or omissions relative to the simpler details and processes 2 The student’s responses demonstrate no major errors or omissions regarding any of the information and/or processes 3 In addition to exhibiting level 3 performance, the student’s responses demonstrate in-depth inferences and applications that go beyond what was taught in class 4
    48. 53. [email_address] I don’t understand yet. I can’t do it by myself. My mistakes show that I have trouble with the important ideas. 1 Novice Beginning I’m getting there! My mistakes show I understand most of the important ideas. Sometimes I need help. 2 Apprentice Developing I understand the important ideas. I can do it by myself. Once in awhile, I make little or careless mistakes. 3 Master Proficient I understand completely! I can do it without making mistakes. I can help others. 4 Expert Exceeds Skill Indicators: Skill: I can Rubric
    49. 54. “ The primary purpose of formative assessment is to improve learning .” Learning – Collaboration - Results
    50. 55. “ Classroom assessment for student learning turns the classroom assessment process and its results into instructional strategies designed to increase, not merely monitor, student learning, confidence and motivation.” ~ Rick Stiggins
    51. 56. <ul><li>Purpose of formative assessment </li></ul><ul><li>improve student learning </li></ul><ul><li>direct instructional strategies </li></ul><ul><li>~ Rick Stiggins </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    52. 57. <ul><li>If kids don’t want to learn, </li></ul><ul><li>there will be no learning. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>If kids don’t feel able to learn, there will be no learning. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>The questions is… </li></ul><ul><li>How can we use assessments to help our students to learn? </li></ul><ul><li>Rick Stiggins, 2004. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    53. 58. Critical Learning Questions <ul><li>What do we want each students to learn, know or be able to do? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we know they have learned? What evidence do we have of the learning? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we respond when students don’t learn or struggle? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we respond to those who have already learned? </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results Pyramid Of Intervention Differentiated Instruction IDM
    54. 59. Confronting the Question, “How will we respond when our students don’t learn?” requires… <ul><li>a school-wide plan </li></ul><ul><li>that guarantees students </li></ul><ul><li>the time and support they need regardless </li></ul><ul><li>of who their teacher might be. </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    55. 60. The Charles Darwin School “ We believe all kids can learn . . . based on their ability.” The Chicago Cub Fan School “ We believe all kids can learn . . . something, and we will help all students experience academic growth in a warm and nurturing environment.” The Henry Higgins School “ We believe all kids can learn… and we will work to help all students achieve high Standards of learning.” The Pontius Pilate School “ We believe all kids can learn . . . if they take advantage of their opportunity we give them to learn.”
    56. 61. Collectively <ul><li>Develop consistent, systematic procedures that ensure that each student will receive the support they need to succeed. </li></ul><ul><li>- What Ever It Takes </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    57. 62. Three Big Ideas <ul><li>Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul>
    58. 63. <ul><li>We assess our effectiveness on the basis of results rather than intentions. Individuals, teams, and schools seek relevant data and information and use that information to promote continuous improvement. </li></ul>Results Learning – Collaboration - Results
    59. 64. Collective Responsibility <ul><li>The best organization are places where everyone has permission, or better yet, the responsibility to gather and act on quantitative and qualitative data, and to help everyone else learn what they know. </li></ul><ul><li>- Pfeffer & Sutton (2006) </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    60. 65. Focus on Results in Three Ways <ul><li>To ensure the success of all students. </li></ul><ul><li>To identify students who need more time and support for learning </li></ul><ul><li>To identify strategies to improve upon both our individual an collective ability to teach each essential skill and concept. </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    61. 66. <ul><li>Effective teams engage in </li></ul><ul><li>“ reflective practice” asking </li></ul><ul><li>themselves, “How does our </li></ul><ul><li>analysis of student learning </li></ul><ul><li>affect our instructional </li></ul><ul><li>Decision-making?” </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    62. 67. <ul><li>Is every teacher in your school clear on what each student should know and be able to do as a result of each grade level, course of unit of instruction </li></ul><ul><li>What systems are in place in your school to monitor each student’s learning? </li></ul><ul><li>Do teachers have access to the information on each students learning? </li></ul><ul><li>How will decisions move us toward the vision we seek to become? </li></ul>Learning – Collaboration - Results
    63. 68. Characteristics of a Learning Community <ul><li>Shared mission, vision, values goals </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative teams focused on learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collective inquiry into best practice and current reality </li></ul><ul><li>Action Orientation and experimentation </li></ul><ul><li>Commitment to continuous improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Results orientation </li></ul>
    64. 69. Student Learning Expectation Deconstruct Learning Expectation Formative Assessment Data Driven Decision PLC Discussion Focus on Student Learning Implement Effective Instructional Strategy
    65. 70. <ul><li>In a Professional Learning Community educators create an environment that fosters mutual cooperation, emotional support and personal growth as they work together to achieve what they cannot accomplish alone. </li></ul><ul><li>--PLC at Work </li></ul>
    66. 71. <ul><li>Access to both quantitative and </li></ul><ul><li>qualitative research on PLCs, go to www.allthingsplc.info </li></ul><ul><li>References: </li></ul><ul><li>Richard and Rebecca DuFour </li></ul><ul><li>Robert Eaker </li></ul><ul><li>Solution Tree http://www.solution-tree.com/Public/Main.aspx </li></ul>

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