Overview and Goals <ul><li>talk a little bit about how/if/when/why video projects are situated in the composition classroo...
SOME OCCASIONS FOR MAKING VIDEOS <ul><li>humorous medical documentation > </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzGhDv...
<ul><li>humiliation of cats >  </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIl-4fn27WM </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com/wat...
Video in Classrooms <ul><li>what sorts of activities and assignments are you or other students or faculty you’ve observed ...
WHY VIDEO?
MOVIES IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM <ul><li>“ Film as Dramatic Literature” by Richard Gollin,  College English  (1969) </li></...
Diana  George “ … visual and written communication continue to be held in a kind of tension —the visual figuring into the ...
“ ...to ‘do’ visual rhetoric in composition too often means  not  to work with students on authoring multimedia visual tex...
“ Composition and new media scholars [especially in higher ed] write about how readers can make meaning from images, typef...
LET’S MAKE MOVIES! <ul><li>in pairs, open up your jump drive </li></ul><ul><li>select the “intro to video 1” folder; there...
<ul><li>using the files in the folder, create an approximately 30 –4 0 second digital movie </li></ul><ul><li>your goal is...
[watch a few examples?]
<ul><li>output your movie as a  .mov  (Mac / iMovie) or  .wmv  file (Windows MovieMaker </li></ul><ul><li>name your file w...
<ul><li>[let’s watch some movies!] </li></ul>
so what?
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Danielle DeVoss Intro to Video 1

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Danielle DeVoss Intro to Video 1

  1. 2. Overview and Goals <ul><li>talk a little bit about how/if/when/why video projects are situated in the composition classroom (and beyond) </li></ul><ul><li>view some initial videos </li></ul><ul><li>make videos with “found” materials </li></ul><ul><li>talk about some implications and the “so what” of video production </li></ul>
  2. 3. SOME OCCASIONS FOR MAKING VIDEOS <ul><li>humorous medical documentation > </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzGhDvS1Tjo </li></ul><ul><li>rage-filled commentary > www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyUrL2Wim6Q </li></ul><ul><li>(the inspiration: www.youtube.com/watch?v=iM7MR5_v47w&feature=related ) </li></ul><ul><li>short promotional video clips > </li></ul><ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7pPqJCQV5Q </li></ul></ul><ul><li>video lectures > </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm992z1Lgrs </li></ul>
  3. 4. <ul><li>humiliation of cats > </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIl-4fn27WM </li></ul><ul><li>www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQRHzEV89qA </li></ul><ul><li>departmental promos for web splash page > </li></ul><ul><li>ART_EXAMPLE.mov </li></ul><ul><li>THEATRE_EXAMPLE.mov </li></ul><ul><li>video for Breslin jumbotron > www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoSbtx1NoFk </li></ul>
  4. 5. Video in Classrooms <ul><li>what sorts of activities and assignments are you or other students or faculty you’ve observed doing? </li></ul><ul><li>what sorts of video projects are students and faculty bringing to Sweetland? </li></ul><ul><li>how are writing researchers and scholars—or other researchers and scholars!—talking about digital movies in the classroom? </li></ul>
  5. 6. WHY VIDEO?
  6. 7. MOVIES IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM <ul><li>“ Film as Dramatic Literature” by Richard Gollin, College English (1969) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Using Painting, Photography and Film to Teach a Writing Course” by Joseph Comprome, College English (1973) </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Woman in the Film” by Lesley Dauer, College English (1992) </li></ul><ul><li>College English discussion of the film Crash (69.4, 2007) </li></ul>
  7. 8. Diana George “ … visual and written communication continue to be held in a kind of tension —the visual figuring into the teaching of writing as a problematic, something added, an anomaly, a “new” way of composing, or, somewhat cynically, as a strategy for adding relevance or interest to a required course. Only rarely does that call address students as producers as well as consumers or critics of the visual. More rarely does the call acknowledge the visual as much more than attendant to the verbal.”
  8. 9. “ ...to ‘do’ visual rhetoric in composition too often means not to work with students on authoring multimedia visual texts that combine word and images but, rather, to work on critically reading visual artifacts and demonstrating this critical reading through the evidence of a print essay ” Steve Westbrook
  9. 10. “ Composition and new media scholars [especially in higher ed] write about how readers can make meaning from images, typefaces, videos, animations, and sounds. . . but most scholars don’t compose with these media. ” Cheryl Ball
  10. 11. LET’S MAKE MOVIES! <ul><li>in pairs, open up your jump drive </li></ul><ul><li>select the “intro to video 1” folder; there are three subfolders: IMAGES, MUSIC, and VIDEO CLIPS </li></ul><ul><li>launch either iMovie or Windows MovieMaker </li></ul>
  11. 12. <ul><li>using the files in the folder, create an approximately 30 –4 0 second digital movie </li></ul><ul><li>your goal is to craft an argument about WRITING </li></ul><ul><li>you can use the images </li></ul><ul><li>you can use the music clips </li></ul><ul><li>you can use the video clips </li></ul><ul><li>you can add text inside the movie-making application </li></ul><ul><li>you can add transitions inside the movie-making application </li></ul>
  12. 13. [watch a few examples?]
  13. 14. <ul><li>output your movie as a .mov (Mac / iMovie) or .wmv file (Windows MovieMaker </li></ul><ul><li>name your file with your group members’ names (e.g., smith_doe_jones) </li></ul><ul><li>save a copy of your movie on the jump drive that’ll be floating around (with the lime green lanyard) </li></ul>
  14. 15. <ul><li>[let’s watch some movies!] </li></ul>
  15. 16. so what?

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