CHAPEL      A chapel is a building used by Christians as a place of fellowship andworship. It may be part of a larger stru...
CHURCH COMPLEXFlatbush Dutch Reformed Church Complex       Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church Complex, also referred to more s...
Fort Miller Reformed Church ComplexFortMiller Reformed Church Complex is a historic church on Fort Miller Road, west ofUS ...
The Corpus Christi R.C. Church Complex       The Corpus Christi R.C. Church Complex is a series of several buildingslocate...
Emmanuel Episcopal Church Complex      Emmanuel Episcopal Church Complex is a historic Episcopal churchcomplex located at ...
German United Evangelical Church Complex       German United Evangelical Church Complex, also known as SalemEvangelical Ch...
Riverdale Presbyterian Church Complex       Riverdale Presbyterian Church Complex, also known as Duff House & DuffCottage ...
Our Mother of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church Complex      Our Mother of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church Complex is a historic...
Ohio Street Methodist Episcopal Church ComplexOhio Street Methodist Episcopal Church Complex, also known as Third AvenueMe...
CHAPEL and CHURCH           COMPLEX                     Date Given: January 10, 2012                 Date Submitted: Janua...
GENERAL CONCEPT      When building your house of worship here are the basics rules of thumb.When purchasing land plan on 1...
THE PLAN        The basic determinant of the plan is the programmed relationship betweenthe congregation and the altar are...
WORK SACRISTY      Work Sacristy This room may also have many different names, but itsfunction is to provide space for flo...
CHANCEL      In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar in thesanctuary at the liturgical east end ...
Chapel
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Chapel

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Chapel

  1. 1. CHAPEL A chapel is a building used by Christians as a place of fellowship andworship. It may be part of a larger structure or complex, such as a church, college,hospital, palace, prison or funeral home, located on board a military orcommercial ship, or it may be an entirely free-standing building, sometimes withits own grounds. Many military installations have chapels for the use of militarypersonnel, normally under the leadership of a military chaplain. Until theProtestant Reformation, a chapel denoted a place of worship that was either at asecondary location that was not the main responsibility of the local parish priest,or that belonged to a person or institution. Most large churches had one or moresecondary altars, which if they occupied a distinct space, would often be called achapel. The word chapel is in particularly common usage in the United Kingdom,and even more so in Wales, for independent or nonconformist places of worship;and in Scotland and Ireland for Roman Catholic churches. In the UK, due to therise in popularity of independent or nonconformist chapels throughout the lateeighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, by the time of the 1851 census, morepeople attended the independent chapels than attended the states Anglicanchurches. The word, chapel, like the associated word, chaplain, originally hadChristian roots, but is used in a wider context today. While many aredenominational, many are non-denominational. The latter are mostlyencountered as part of a non-religious institution such as a hospital, prison ormilitary installation. In England, where the Anglican Church is established by law,nondenominational or inter-faith chapels in such institutions may nonetheless beconsecrated by the local Anglican bishop. Chapels that are built as part of a larger church are holy areas set aside forsome specific use or purpose: for instance, many cathedrals and large churcheshave a "Lady Chapel" in the apse, dedicated to the Virgin Mary; parish churchesmay have such a "Lady Chapel" in a side aisle or a "Chapel of Reservation" wherethe consecrated bread and wine of the Eucharist are kept in reserve betweenservices, for the purpose of taking Holy Communion to the sick and houseboundand, in some Christian traditions, for devotional purposes.
  2. 2. CHURCH COMPLEXFlatbush Dutch Reformed Church Complex Flatbush Dutch Reformed Church Complex, also referred to more simply asthe Flatbush Reformed Church, is a historic Dutch Reformed church (now amember of the Reformed Church in America) at 890 Flatbush Avenue and 2101-2103 Kenmore Terrace in Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York. The complex consists ofthe church, church house, parsonage, and cemetery. The congregation wasfounded in 1654. The 2 1⁄2-story stone church building was constructed in 1796and features a stone tower with stone belfry. The stained glass windows are byTiffany studios and commemorate the descendants of many early settlers ofFlatbush. The church house is a 2 1⁄2-story red brick and limestone building. Theparsonage is a 2 1⁄2-story wood-frame house moved to its present site in 1918.The cemetery is the last resting place of most of the members of the early Dutchfamilies of Flatbush. The earliest legible grave marker dates to 1754.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.
  3. 3. Fort Miller Reformed Church ComplexFortMiller Reformed Church Complex is a historic church on Fort Miller Road, west ofUS 4 and south of Galusha Island and located at Fort Edward in WashingtonCounty, New York. The church was built in 1816 and has a two story, clapboardsided sanctuary and four story bell tower in the Federal style. A two story rearwing was added in 1896 and also attached is a carriage and horse shed dated toabout 1818-1822. Included in the complex is a parsonage (ca. 1845), custodian /tenant house (ca. 1845), and a late 19th century clapboard barn.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.
  4. 4. The Corpus Christi R.C. Church Complex The Corpus Christi R.C. Church Complex is a series of several buildingslocated on Buffalos historic East Side. The complex contains the Kolbe Center,Sears Street Hall, Rectory, Convent and the huge sandstone church that towersover the neighborhood. The complex school was closed in 1982 and has beenrazed. The Church was founded by the Franciscans to serve the religious needs ofthe growing Polish community of the East Side. The church community grew inthe early 20th century as immigrants poured into the neighborhood. The churchhas suffered the problems that have plagued other inner-city churches acrossAmerica the past 30 years. As parishioners moved to the suburbs, the Churchbecame increasingly empty during masses and the school was closed in the early1980s. The Complex was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.
  5. 5. Emmanuel Episcopal Church Complex Emmanuel Episcopal Church Complex is a historic Episcopal churchcomplex located at 37 W. Main Street in Norwich, Chenango County, New York.The complex consists of the church, parish hall, and education building. Thechurch was designed by noted architect Isaac G. Perry and built in 1874 in theGothic Revival style. It is a one story, rectangular limestone structure, 116 feetlong and 62 feet wide. The main facade features two square, engaged towers ofuneven heights. The parish hall was built in 1915 and expanded with theeducation building. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.
  6. 6. German United Evangelical Church Complex German United Evangelical Church Complex, also known as SalemEvangelical Church (1921), Salem Evangelical and Reformed Church (1943), andSalem United Church of Christ (1957), is a historic Evangelical and Reformedchurch complex located at Rochester in Monroe County, New York. The complexincludes the original church structure (1874) with attached wing (1895) and thelater parish house and church school (1923). It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992.
  7. 7. Riverdale Presbyterian Church Complex Riverdale Presbyterian Church Complex, also known as Duff House & DuffCottage (Gardeners Cottage), is a historic Presbyterian church at 4761-4765Henry Hudson Parkway in The Bronx, New York, New York. It was designed in1863 by noted architect James Renwick, Jr. (1818-1895). It is a fieldstone buildingin the Late Gothic Revival style. It was substantially enlarged in 1936. The complexalso includes the Duff House, also designed by Renwick, and a Stick Style cottagebuilt in 1875 known as Duff Cottage. The church established the Edgehill Churchat Spuyten Duyvil in 1869.
  8. 8. Our Mother of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church Complex Our Mother of Sorrows Roman Catholic Church Complex is a historicRoman Catholic church complex located at Greece in Monroe County, New York.The complex consists of the Romanesque Revival style brick church (ca 1858-1878) and the adjacent community cemetery (1823-ca. 1900). The church wasconverted for use as a public library. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.
  9. 9. Ohio Street Methodist Episcopal Church ComplexOhio Street Methodist Episcopal Church Complex, also known as Third AvenueMethodist Church and St. Ann Maronite Catholic Church, is a historic MethodistEpiscopal church at 1921 Third Avenue in Watervliet, Albany County, New York. Itwas originally built about 1850 and modified about 1895. The parish house wasbuilt about 1880. Both are brick buildings with wood floor and roof framing andstone foundations.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005.
  10. 10. CHAPEL and CHURCH COMPLEX Date Given: January 10, 2012 Date Submitted: January 17, 2012JASPER T. BONNAO ARCH. ROEL P. SALVATIERRA Architecture – 1 Architectural Design – 2
  11. 11. GENERAL CONCEPT When building your house of worship here are the basics rules of thumb.When purchasing land plan on 1 usable acre of paved, stripped parking for every300 people. A paved, stripped parking area should be able to accommodatebetween 100-115 cars per usable acre and most building codes allocate 1 car per3 people. Many local building codes may require islands of planted vegetationwithin the parking lot which reduces the number of cars per acreTHE CHURCH BUILDING The most efficient plan for your church will be in the shape of a rectangle –other shapes will require more square footage per person as well as be moreexpensive to construct.THE SITE The “house of Worship” is by its very nature an important public building. Itspeaks to the entire community about the beliefs and aspirations of thecongregations. Unfortunately, some congregations worship in churchesconsiderably more "triumphant" than their creed, and it is advisable to strive forsimplicity and subtlety. The churchs position on the site will be somewhatdetermined by this "public image," but some functional considerations also exist.On a limited urban site the church may occupy so much of the land that onlybuilding entry and egress are possible. However, if there is room on the site forparking spaces, these will be useful even if the majority of the worshipers walk.The possibility of pulling wedding and funeral cars out of the stream of streettraffic as well as dropping off worshipers during inclement weather is worthinvestigation. The suburban or country church site is usually larger and, with adispersed congregation, the car parking capability is no longer optional, it isindeed essential. Ample parking areas reached by convenient driveways arefunctional necessities. There is a stronger entrance relationship to the parkingareas and driveways than there may be to the street. Many otherwise successfullydesigned churches are flawed by the fact that most of the congregation is alwayscoming in the back door. The more generous site permits the consideration ofoutdoor worship as well as other outdoor activities. The building program mustconsider these possibilities very thoroughly.
  12. 12. THE PLAN The basic determinant of the plan is the programmed relationship betweenthe congregation and the altar area. The emphasis of all faiths is on theinvolvement of the congregation in the action of the worship service. Plans whichsuggest an auditorium, with the altar platform viewed through a proscenium arch,have an unfortunate "performance" aspect. Likewise, plan forms which destroythe oneness of the congregation are less favored. Since all faiths place emphasison the spoken word, it is important to consider the ability of the preacher tomaintain eye contact with the congregation. "Theater in the round is not arecommended approach for this reason. Great care must be exercised if thestructure requires columns or piers within the worship space for obvious reasonshaving to do with the sight lines. Although there is no liturgical requirement forseating, the length of most services requires the utilization of a seating device. Itis in this particular aspect that the concept of flexible use collides with reality. Thechurch pew has in its favor its relatively modest cost and its orderly appearance.The much more flexible individual chair generally requires more space per personand, even when ganged, requires straightening by custodial help. The desire ofthe congregation for no worship uses of the church will determine the type ofseating. It is worth noting that some church plans, with the assistance of movablealtar platforms and chairs, permit more than one arrangement of thecongregation. This is an attractive possibility for church groups interested ininnovation.VESTING ROOM Although each denomination favors a particular nomenclature, thefunction remains the same. The celebrant requires a room for robbing and thestorage of vestments and the ceremonial utensils. It is prudent to consider a toiletconnected to this room. Often this room will accommodate a guest speaker oranother clergyman. Vestments should be stored flat or hung no tighter than threeper foot. It is important that this room be located thoughtfully in relation to boththe entry and the worship space. While it is convenient to consider a positionclose to the altar platform, it will work at a disadvantage if the worship ceremonyinvolves procession through the congregation or if the minister is to greet or bidfarewell to the congregation at the entry. Acolytes or altar boys also require avesting space, which should be near the vesting room for supervision.
  13. 13. WORK SACRISTY Work Sacristy This room may also have many different names, but itsfunction is to provide space for flower arranging, the storage of altar cloths(sometimes also their washing and pressing), ceremonial utensil storage andcleaning, and candle and candlestick storage. A sink is required, as well as storagecupboards or closets. This room is best located near the altar platform if at allpossible.NARTHEX The narthex of a church is the entrance or lobby area, located at the end ofthe nave, at the far end from the churchs main altar. Traditionally the narthexwas a part of the church building, but was not considered part of the churchproper. It was either an indoor area separated from the nave by a screen or rail,or an external structure such as a porch.NAVE In Romanesque and Gothic Christian abbey, cathedral basilica and churcharchitecture, the nave is the central approach to the high altar, the main body ofthe church. "Nave" (Medieval Latin navies, "ship") was probably suggested by thekeel shape of its vaulting. The nave of a church, whether Romanesque, Gothic orClassical, extends from the entry — which may have a separate vestibule, thenarthex — to the chancel and is flanked by lower aisles separated from the naveby an arcade. If the aisles are high and of a width comparable to the central nave,the structure is sometimes said to have three naves.HOLY WATER FONTA holy water font or stoup is a vessel containing holy water generally placed nearthe entrance of a church. It is used in Catholic Church and Lutheran churches, aswell as some Anglican churches to make the Sign of the Cross using the holy waterupon entrance and exit. Holy Water is blessed by a priest, and Catholics believe itcan repel evil and cleanse venial sins, although its primary purpose is to remindpeople of their baptism.
  14. 14. CHANCEL In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar in thesanctuary at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building. Itmay terminate in an apse. As well as the altar, the chancel usually houses thecredence table, and seats for officiating and assisting ministers. In Anglican andMethodist churches it will usually include the choir. In some traditions, the pulpitand lectern may be in the chancel, but in others these functions are consideredproper to the nave. The chancel is typically raised somewhat above the level of the nave, wherethe congregation gathers. It may be separated from the nave by a rood screen, arail, or an open space. In some churches, the congregation may gather on threesides or in a semicircle around the chancel.PULPIT Pulpit is a speakers stand in a church. In many Christian churches, there aretwo speakers stands at the front of the church. Typically, the one on the left (asviewed by the congregation) is called the pulpit. Since the Gospel lesson is oftenread from the pulpit, the pulpit side of the church is sometimes called the gospelside.LECTERN A lectern (from the Latin lectus, past participle of legere, "to read") is areading desk with a slanted top, usually placed on a stand or affixed to someother form of support, on which documents or books are placed as support forreading aloud, as in a scripture reading, lecture, or sermon. To facilitate eye-contact and improve posture when facing an audience, lecterns may haveadjustable height and slant. People generally use lecterns while standing.ALTAR An altar is any structure upon which offerings such as sacrifices are madefor religious purposes. Altars are usually found at shrines, and they can be locatedin temples, churches and other places of worship.

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