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SVAG - Analysis of UNC School System

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This report is an analysis & audit of the UNC School System – allocation & recognition of GI Bill revenues for residency classification and its’ correlation to providing adequate services, facilities, resources, and assistance to said recipients in a proportional manner consistent with respect to the number of student Veterans using such GI Bill benefits.

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SVAG - Analysis of UNC School System

  1. 1. analysis & audit OF north carolina’s UNC SCHOOL SYSTEM ALLOCATION & RECOGNITION OF GI BILL REVENUES for residency classification AND CORELATION TO providing ADEQUATE SERVICES, RESOURCES, AND ASSISTANCE TO RECIPIENTSReport authored byJason R. ThigpenFounder/PresidentStudent Veterans Advocacy GroupWebsite: www.studentveteransadvocacygroup.orgEmail: jasonthigpen@mysvag.orgFollow us on:Facebook: facebook.com/SVANCTwitter: @Student_Vets August 27, 2012
  2. 2. table of contentsIntroduction 3Results and Recommendations 4Appendix A – Department of Veterans Affairs – North Carolina Statistics 6 (GI Bill use in NC 2000-2010)Appendix B – Median Costs to Attend NC Colleges and Universities 7Appendix C – Cost Comparison of Attending NC Colleges and Universities 8 (for in-state and out-of-state residents in ’09-’11)Appendix D – Statistics for all NC Colleges & Universities 10 (Student Body Populations – Undergraduate)Appendix E – North Carolina General Statute 116-143.3 through 116-143.6 14Appendix F – UNC SERVES – April 2011 “Report to the President” 16Report authored byJason R. ThigpenFounder/PresidentStudent Veterans Advocacy GroupWebsite: www.studentveteransadvocacygroup.orgEmail: jasonthigpen@mysvag.orgFollow us on:Facebook: facebook.com/SVANCTwitter: @Student_Vets   2  
  3. 3. introductionMISSION The Student Veterans Advocacy Group’s mission is to serve, assist, and advocate for our nation’s Veterans and their dependents – ensuring the benefits earned through their time in-service are accessible, adequate, and available. The Student Veterans Advocacy Group supports the rights of our Veterans nationwide, by safeguarding the education benefits owed to them, which results in a positive impact on our local, state, and national communities- at-large.OBJECTIVE This report is an analysis & audit of the UNC School System – allocation & recognition of GI Bill revenues for residency classification and its’ correlation to providing adequate services, facilities, resources, and assistance to said recipients in a proportional manner consistent with respect to the number of student Veterans using such GI Bill benefits.BACKGROUND The Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) reported in 2010 - 24,508 Veterans and/or Dependents used GI Bill Education Benefits in North Carolina. Effective August 1, 2011 - the Post- 9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-377) detrimentally impacted thousands of Veterans attending public colleges in North Carolina with the issue of in-state residency for tuition purposes, the results of which left Veterans with a financial burden of paying the difference between the in- state and out-of-state tuition rate. Prior to this change, the VA paid up to $17,500 in tuition per academic year, regardless of residency classification. While the State faced many challenges due to such complex changes in the GI Bill, the UNC School System implemented a working group for the System-wide Evaluation & Recommendation for Veterans Education & Services. The goal is to “improve access, retention and graduation rates for active-duty service members, Veterans, and their families at UNC institutions”.   3  
  4. 4. RESULTS AND RECOMMENDATIONSFINDING Less Than 10% of UNC System Schools Offer Adequate Services, Facilities, Resources, and Assistance To Its’ Student Veterans Prior to August 1, 2011 residency for tuition purposes was of no concern for GI Bill beneficiaries or UNC System Schools because the GI Bill paid tuition rates up to $17,500 per academic year, regardless of whether the school classified the student as in-state or out-of-state. There were approximately 401,000 undergraduate students were attending North Carolina colleges and universities in 2010. Of this, app. 42% were attending UNC Universities, app. 50% attended UNC Community Colleges, leaving app. 8% attending private colleges and universities. Resulting in approximately 10,200 GI Bill recipients attending the 16 public universities and 12,600 attending the 116 community colleges within the UNC School System. The median cost-difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition costs for 4-year North Carolina universities in 2010 was app. $11,388 and $5,760 for 2-year Community Colleges in North Carolina. If all such student Veterans using the GI Bill were classified as in- state residents for tuition purposes in 2010 the UNC School System would have generated app. $66,000,000 and if all of them were classified as out-of-state residents for tuition purposes, the UNC School System would’ve generated app. $259,000,000 from respective attending student Veterans, in 2010. Assuming only 50% of such students were classified as out-of-state residents, the UNC School System received revenues of approximately $163,000,000 from GI Bill beneficiaries in 2010. Therefore, the UNC School System stood to lose between app. $97,000,000 and $193,000,000 unless billing such differences to said student Veterans, due to the change in law with the Post-9/11 GI Bill becoming effective in August of 2011. Since the inception of the GI Bill in the 1940’s, the Department of Veterans Affairs paid the cost billed by UNC System Schools, regardless of residency classification. Despite the numerous requests made to the UNC System Schools, for financial records and reports segregating the GI Bill revenues, the only consistent response thus far is none at all and they dont know. Unsettling questions regarding possible waste   4  
  5. 5. and abuse, regarding potential over-billing to the Department of Veterans Affairs and attending student Veterans using GI Bill benefits, are surfacing due to the inconsistency and lack of transparency from the UNC School System and schools within. Even more troubling - only 4 UNC System Schools offer adequate designated services, facilities, resources, and assistance commensurate with the revenues received by these institutions from attending student Veterans. Around 90% of the remaining UNC System Schools dont offer enough to be noteworthy or reported.RECOMMENDATIONS We recommend a comprehensive audit and investigation be done on each institution in the UNC School System segregating all GI Bill related funds and recipients from 2007-2011 by: year, residency classification, and the number of student beneficiaries represented in the same. This comprehensive audit should be done by a third-party non-affiliate in cooperation with our organization within a reasonable timeframe. Additionally, we recommend the UNC School System and schools allocate funds proportional with the number of GI Bill beneficiaries attending their respective institutions to provide services, facilities, resources, and assistance to such students. Lastly, we recommend the UNC School System and schools within implement a consistent program, by working with our organization in a manner that may unilaterally bridge the divide currently present to such students in the UNC School System.  OUR PERSPECTIVE   "Criticism is necessary and useful; it is often indispensable; but it can never take the place of action, or be even a poor substitute for it. The function of the mere critic is of very subordinate usefulness. It is the doer of deeds who actually counts in the battle for life, and not the man who looks on and says how the fight ought to be fought, without himself sharing the stress and the danger." (1894) - Theodore Roosevelt "A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards. More than that no man is entitled, and less than that no man shall have." - Theodore Roosevelt   5  
  6. 6. APPENDIX A Department  of  Veterans  Affairs  Education  Program  Beneficiaries  by  Geography1:   FY2000  to  FY2010   Program  Name       Post-­‐ Fiscal   Total   MGIB-­‐AD   MGIB-­‐SR   DEA   VEAP   REAP   9/11   Year   Beneficiaries   Trainees   Trainees   Trainees   Trainees   Trainees   Trainees   North  Carolina   2000   12,682   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   2001   12,883   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   2002   13,960   9,960   1,807   2,161   32   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   2003   14,912   10,399   1,820   2,670   23   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   2004   15,172   10,515   1,523   3,115   19   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   2005   15,794   10,462   1,812   3,505   15   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   2006   15,179   10,242   1,280   3,642   15   -­‐-­‐   -­‐-­‐   2007   16,552   10,447   1,222   3,865   14   1,004   -­‐-­‐   2008   16,148   10,423   1,376   3,938   13   398   -­‐-­‐   2009   15,730   9,785   1,327   3,861   12   745   -­‐-­‐   2010   24,508   7,973   1,598   4,267   7   595   10,068     6  
  7. 7. APPENDIX Bhttp://info.sreb.org/DataLibrary/tables/Tuition11.xlsxMEDIANS (COSTS) Undergrad. In-State Undergrad. Out-of-StateState Type ’09-’10 ’10-’11 % ’09-’10 ’10-’11 % Change NC Four-Year 1 5,550 6,597 19 20,737 22,172 7 Four-Year 2 4,331 5,056 17 15,517 16,460 6 Four-Year 3 4,404 4,961 13 14,552 15,778 8 Four-Year 4 3,177 3,476 9 13,520 13,940 3 Four-Year 5 3,629 4,114 13 12,726 13,291 4 Four-Year 6 3,681 4,185 14 14,064 15,389 9 All 4yr 4,330 4,797 11 15,039 16,185 8 Two-Year w/ bachs (7) Two-Year 1 (8) 1,694 1,811 7 7,816 7,571 -3 Two-Year 2 (9) 1,680 1,798 7 7,802 7,558 -3 Two-Year 3 (10) 1,676 1,780 6 7,798 7,540 -3 All 2yr 1,682 1,798 7 7,804 7,558 -3   7  
  8. 8. APPENDIX Chttp://www.sreb.org/page/1357/data_library_higher_ed_tuition__fees.html Undergrad. In-State Undergrad. Out-of-StateState Institution ’09-’10 ’10-’11 ’09-’10 ’10-‘11 NC North Carolina State University 5,475 6,529 17,960 19,064 University of North Carolina at NC Chapel Hill 5,625 6,665 23,513 25,280 University of North Carolina at NC Charlotte 4,427 5,138 15,039 16,185 University of North Carolina at NC Greensboro 4,234 4,973 15,995 16,734 NC Appalachian State University 4,491 5,251 15,112 16,563 NC East Carolina University 4,477 4,797 15,311 16,871 North Carolina A&T State NC University 3,696 4,416 13,138 13,858 NC North Carolina Central University 3,922 4,561 13,991 15,134 University of North Carolina at NC Wilmington 4,873 5,322 15,755 16,421 NC Western Carolina University 4,330 5,124 13,927 14,721 NC Fayetteville State University 3,177 3,476 13,520 13,940 University of North Carolina at NC Pembroke 3,736 4,140 12,943 13,347 NC Winston-Salem State University 3,522 4,088 12,508 13,234 NC Elizabeth City State University 3,032 3,640 12,081 13,277 University of North Carolina at NC Asheville 4,330 4,729 16,047 17,501 Asheville-Buncombe Technical NC Community College 1,655 1,783 7,777 7,543 NC Cape Fear Community College 1,737 1,847 7,859 7,607 Central Piedmont Community NC College 1,798 1,926 7,920 7,686 Fayetteville Technical Community NC College 1,660 1,800 7,782 7,560 Forsyth Technical Community NC College 1,662 1,772 7,784 7,532 NC Gaston College 1,776 1,886 7,898 7,646 Guilford Technical Community NC College 1,773 1,883 7,895 7,643 NC Pitt Community College 1,686 1,796 7,808 7,556 Rowan-Cabarrus Community NC College 1,702 1,822 7,824 7,582 Wake Technical Community NC College 1,682 1,792 7,804 7,552 NC Alamance Community College 1,630 1,740 7,752 7,500 Caldwell Community College & NC Technical Institute 1,656 1,774 7,778 7,534 Catawba Valley Community NC College 1,669 1,797 7,791 7,557 Central Carolina Commuity NC College 1,688 1,798 7,810 7,558 NC Cleveland Community College 1,665 1,775 7,787 7,535 Coastal Carolina Community NC College 1,630 1,740 7,752 7,500   8  
  9. 9. NC Craven Community College 1,716 1,826 7,838 7,586 Davidson County Community NC College 1,710 1,820 7,832 7,580 Durham Technical Community NC College 1,680 1,790 7,802 7,550 NC Edgecombe Community College 1,672 1,782 7,794 7,542 NC Haywood Community College 1,701 1,811 7,823 7,571 NC Isothermal Community College 1,638 1,748 7,760 7,508 NC Johnston Community College 1,697 1,807 7,819 7,567 NC Lenoir Community College 1,703 1,603 7,825 7,333 NC Mitchell Community College 1,670 1,780 7,792 7,540 NC Nash Community College 1,728 1,816 7,850 7,576 NC Randolph Community College 1,666 1,776 7,788 7,536 NC Robeson Community College 1,660 1,800 7,782 7,560 NC Sandhills Community College 1,697 1,807 7,819 7,567 NC Stanly Community College 1,720 1,830 7,842 7,590 NC Surry Community College 1,703 1,815 7,825 7,575 Vance-Granville Community NC College 1,686 1,808 7,808 7,568 NC Wayne Community College 1,672 1,782 7,794 7,542 Western Piedmont Community NC College 1,627 1,827 7,749 7,587 NC Wilkes Community College 1,719 1,829 7,841 7,589 Beaufort County Community NC College 1,664 1,834 7,786 7,594 NC Bladen Community College 1,682 1,780 7,804 7,540 NC Blue Ridge Community College 1,695 1,795 7,817 7,555 NC Brunswick Community College 1,700 1,810 7,822 7,570 NC Carteret Community College 1,666 1,776 7,788 7,536 NC College of the Albemarle 1,690 1,811 7,812 7,571 NC Halifax Community College 1,718 1,832 7,840 7,592 NC James Sprunt Community College 1,670 1,780 7,792 7,540 NC Martin Community College 1,638 1,748 7,760 7,508 NC Mayland Community College 1,696 1,806 7,818 7,566 McDowell Technical Community NC College 1,668 1,778 7,790 7,538 NC Montgomery Community College 1,665 1,775 7,787 7,535 NC Pamlico Community College 1,635 1,745 7,757 7,505 NC Piedmont Community College 1,648 1,759 7,770 7,519 NC Richmond Community College 1,658 1,768 7,780 7,528 Roanoke-Chowan Community NC College 1,701 1,811 7,823 7,571 NC Rockingham Community College 1,716 1,826 7,838 7,586 NC Sampson Community College 1,676 1,756 7,798 7,516 South Piedmont Community NC College 1,738 1,848 7,860 7,608 Southeastern Community NC College 1,699 1,809 7,821 7,569 Southwestern Community NC College 1,665 1,775 7,787 7,535 NC Tri-County Community College 1,659 1,769 7,781 7,529 Wilson Technical Community NC College 1,687 1,809 7,809 7,569 NC North Carolina School of the Arts 5,449 6,453 17,395 18,811   9  
  10. 10. APPENDIX DNorth Carolina College and University – Student Enrollment Statisticshttp://collegestats.org/colleges/north-carolina/lowest-instate-tuition   Institution                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Asheville-­‐Buncombe  Technical  Community  College   Asheville   NC   6,408   Randolph  Community  College   Asheboro   NC   2,521   Vance-­‐Granville  Community  College   Henderson   NC   4,135   Southeastern  Community  College   Whiteville   NC   1,811   Craven  Community  College   New  Bern   NC   3,032   Brunswick  Community  College   Supply   NC   1,162   Davidson  County  Community  College   Thomasville   NC   3,399   Southwestern  Community  College   Sylva   NC   2,040   Central  Carolina  Community  College   Sanford   NC   4,603   Sandhills  Community  College   Pinehurst   NC   3,826   Western  Piedmont  Community  College   Morganton   NC   2,448   Alamance  Community  College   Graham   NC   3,925   Forsyth  Technical  Community  College   Winston  Salem   NC   7,276   Roanoke-­‐Chowan  Community  College   Ahoskie   NC   384   Pamlico  Community  College   Grantsboro   NC   393   Coastal  Carolina  Community  College   Jacksonville   NC   4,349   Caldwell  Community  College  and  Technical   Institute   Hudson   NC   3,728   Piedmont  Community  College   Roxboro   NC   2,575   Catawba  Valley  Community  College   Hickory   NC   4,765   Blue  Ridge  Community  College   Flat  Rock   NC   1,968   Haywood  Community  College   Clyde   NC   2,127   Cleveland  Community  College   Shelby   NC   2,064   Isothermal  Community  College   Spindale   NC   2,131   Richmond  Community  College   Hamlet   NC   1,799   Martin  Community  College   Williamston   NC   755   Wilson  Community  College   Wilson   NC   1,642   Wayne  Community  College   Goldsboro   NC   2,988   Tri-­‐County  Community  College   Murphy   NC   1,079   Robeson  Community  College   Lumberton   NC   1,788   Stanly  Community  College   Albemarle   NC   2,390   Wake  Technical  Community  College   Raleigh   NC   12,238   Beaufort  County  Community  College   Washington   NC   1,476   Rowan-­‐Cabarrus  Community  College   Salisbury   NC   5,158   Surry  Community  College   Dobson   NC   3,201     10  
  11. 11. Montgomery  Community  College   Troy   NC   954   Sampson  Community  College   Clinton   NC   1,278   Cape  Fear  Community  College   Wilmington   NC   7,570   College  of  the  Albemarle   Elizabeth  City   NC   2,117   James  Sprunt  Community  College   Kenansville   NC   1,118   Johnston  Community  College   Smithfield   NC   4,145   Mitchell  Community  College   Statesville   NC   2,687   Bladen  Community  College   Dublin   NC   1,226   Edgecombe  Community  College   Tarboro   NC   1,687   Lenoir  Community  College   Kinston   NC   2,733   South  Piedmont  Community  College   Polkton   NC   2,250   Wilkes  Community  College   Wilkesboro   NC   2,476   Mayland  Community  College   Spruce  Pine   NC   1,472   Pitt  Community  College   Winterville   NC   6,499   Rockingham  Community  College   Wentworth   NC   2,013   Nash  Community  College   Rocky  Mount   NC   2,916   Halifax  Community  College   Weldon   NC   1,142   McDowell  Technical  Community  College   Marion   NC   1,134   Carteret  Community  College   Morehead  City   NC   1,628   Fayetteville  Technical  Community  College   Fayetteville   NC   9,063   Guilford  Technical  Community  College   Jamestown   NC   10,571   Durham  Technical  Community  College   Durham   NC   5,170   Gaston  College   Dallas   NC   5,718   Central  Piedmont  Community  College   Charlotte   NC   18,052   Elizabeth  City  State  University   Elizabeth  City   NC   3,061   Winston-­‐Salem  State  University   Winston-­‐Salem   NC   5,870   Fayetteville  State  University   Fayetteville   NC   6,692   North  Carolina  A  &  T  State  University   Greensboro   NC   10,498   North  Carolina  Central  University   Durham   NC   8,383   University  of  North  Carolina  at  Pembroke   Pembroke   NC   5,937   University  of  North  Carolina  at  Greensboro   Greensboro   NC   18,627   University  of  North  Carolina  at  Asheville   Asheville   NC   3,701   Western  Carolina  University   Cullowhee   NC   9,056   University  of  North  Carolina  at  Charlotte   Charlotte   NC   22,388   Appalachian  State  University   Boone   NC   15,871   Carolina  Christian  College   Winston  Salem   NC   30   East  Carolina  University   Greenville   NC   25,990   University  of  North  Carolina-­‐Wilmington   Wilmington   NC   12,180   Apex  School  of  Theology   Durham   NC   120   University  of  North  Carolina  School  of  the  Arts   Winston-­‐Salem   NC   867   North  Carolina  State  University  at  Raleigh   Raleigh   NC   31,802   University  of  North  Carolina  at  Chapel  Hill   Chapel  Hill   NC   28,136   New  Life  Theological  Seminary   Charlotte   NC   63     11  
  12. 12. Heritage  Bible  College   Dunn   NC   84   Cabarrus  College  of  Health  Sciences   Concord   NC   358   Roanoke  Bible  College   Elizabeth  City   NC   146   Piedmont  Baptist  College  and  Graduate  School   Winston  Salem   NC   373   Shaw  University   Raleigh   NC   2,866   John  Wesley  College   High  Point   NC   109   University  of  Phoenix-­‐Charlotte  Campus   Charlotte   NC   1,250   University  of  Phoenix-­‐Raleigh  Campus   Raleigh   NC   596   Livingstone  College   Salisbury   NC   960   Louisburg  College   Louisburg   NC   754   Kings  College   Charlotte   NC   522   South  College-­‐Asheville   Asheville   NC   133   DeVry  University-­‐North  Carolina   Charlotte   NC   473   Mount  Olive  College   Mount  Olive   NC   3,277   Saint  Augustines  College   Raleigh   NC   1,284   Bennett  College  for  Women   Greensboro   NC   678   ITT  Technical  Institute-­‐Charlotte   Charlotte   NC   323   Johnson  C  Smith  University   Charlotte   NC   1,463   Chowan  University   Murfreesboro   NC   875   Pfeiffer  University   Misenheimer   NC   2,053   School  of  Communication  Arts   Raleigh   NC   325   Montreat  College   Montreat   NC   1,145   St  Andrews  Presbyterian  College   Laurinburg   NC   747   Wingate  University   Wingate   NC   2,041   Gardner-­‐Webb  University   Boiling  Springs   NC   3,892   Brevard  College   Brevard   NC   675   Belmont  Abbey  College   Belmont   NC   1,337   Mars  Hill  College   Mars  Hill   NC   1,253   Campbell  University  Inc   Buies  Creek   NC   6,208   Barton  College   Wilson   NC   1,130   North  Carolina  Wesleyan  College   Rocky  Mount   NC   1,583   Salem  College   Winston  Salem   NC   992   The  Art  Institute  of  Charlotte   Charlotte   NC   974   Lees-­‐McRae  College   Banner  Elk   NC   882   High  Point  University   High  Point   NC   3,064   Methodist  University   Fayetteville   NC   2,118   Queens  University  of  Charlotte   Charlotte   NC   2,243   Greensboro  College   Greensboro   NC   1,180   Catawba  College   Salisbury   NC   1,323   Warren  Wilson  College   Swannanoa   NC   946   Lenoir-­‐Rhyne  University   Hickory   NC   1,626   Peace  College   Raleigh   NC   692   Johnson  &  Wales  University-­‐Charlotte   Charlotte   NC   2,569     12  
  13. 13. Elon  University   Elon   NC   5,456   Meredith  College   Raleigh   NC   2,202   Guilford  College   Greensboro   NC   2,688   Davidson  College   Davidson   NC   1,674   Wake  Forest  University   Winston  Salem   NC   6,788   Duke  University   Durham   NC   13,598   Carolinas  College  of  Health  Sciences   Charlotte   NC   484   Hood  Theological  Seminary   Salisbury   NC   264     13  
  14. 14. APPENDIX E North Carolina General Statutes Chapter 116 Higher Education Article 14 General Provisions as to Tuition and Fees in Certain State Institutions.§ 116-143.3. Tuition of armed services personnel and their dependents. (a) Definitions. – The following definitions apply in this section: (1) The term "abode" shall mean the place where a person actually lives, whether temporarily or permanently; the term "abide" shall mean to live in a given place. (2) The term "armed services" shall mean the United States Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, and Navy; the North Carolina National Guard; and any Reserve Component of the foregoing. (3) Repealed by Session Laws 2007-484, s. 15, effective August 30, 2007. (b) Any active duty member of the armed services qualifying for admission to an institution of higher education as defined in G.S. 116-143.1 (a)(3) but not qualifying as a resident for tuition purposes under G.S. 116-143.1 shall be charged the in-State tuition rate and applicable mandatory fees for enrollments while the member of the armed services is abiding in this State incident to active military duty in this State. In the event the active duty member of the armed services is reassigned outside of North Carolina or retires, the member shall continue to be eligible for the in-State tuition rate and applicable mandatory fees so long as the member is continuously enrolled in the degree or other program in which the member was enrolled at the time the member is reassigned. In the event the active duty member of the armed services receives an Honorable Discharge from military service, the member shall continue to be eligible for the in-State tuition rate and applicable mandatory fees so long as the member establishes residency in North Carolina within 30 days after the discharge and is continuously enrolled in the degree or other program in which the member was enrolled at the time the member is discharged. (b1), (b2) Repealed by Session Laws 2004-130, s. 1, effective August 1, 2004. (c) Any dependent relative of a member of the armed services who is abiding in this State incident to active military duty, as defined by the Board of Governors of The University of North Carolina and by the State Board of Community Colleges while sharing the abode of that member shall be eligible to be charged the in-State tuition rate, if the dependent relative qualifies for admission to an institution of higher education as defined in G.S. 116-143.1(a)(3). The dependent relatives shall comply with the requirements of the Selective Service System, if applicable, in order to be accorded this benefit. In the event the member of the armed services is   14  
  15. 15. reassigned outside of North Carolina or retires, the dependent relative shall continue to be eligible for the in-State tuition rate and applicable mandatory fees so long as the dependent relative is continuously enrolled in the degree or other program in which the dependent relative was enrolled at the time the member is reassigned or retires. In the event the member of the armed services receives an Honorable Discharge from military service, the dependent relative shall continue to be eligible for the in-State tuition rate and applicable mandatory fees so long as the dependent relative establishes residency within North Carolina within 30 days after the discharge and is continuously enrolled in the degree or other program in which the dependent relative was enrolled at the time the member is discharged. (d) The person applying for the benefit of this section has the burden of proving entitlement to the benefit. (e) A person charged less than the out-of-state tuition rate solely by reason of this section shall not, during the period of receiving that benefit, qualify for or be the basis of conferring the benefit of G.S. 116-143.1(g), (h), (i), (j), (k), or (l). (1983 (Reg. Sess., 1984), c. 1034, s. 57;1985, c. 39, s. 1; c. 479, s. 69; c. 757, s. 154; 1987, c. 564, § 7; 1997-443, s. 10.2; 2003-284, s.8.16(a); 2004-130, s. 1; 2005-276, s. 9.38; 2005-345, s. 14; 2005-445, s. 7; 2007-484, s. 15.)§ 116-143.6. Full scholarship students attending constituent institutions. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if the Board of Trustees of a constituent institution of The University of North Carolina elects to do so, it may by resolution adopted consider as residents of North Carolina all persons who receive full scholarships to the institution from entities recognized by the institution and attend the institution as undergraduate students. The aforesaid persons shall be considered residents of North Carolina for all purposes by The University of North Carolina. (b) The following definitions apply in this section: (1) "Full cost" means an amount calculated by the constituent institution that is no less than the sum of tuition, required fees, and on-campus room and board. (2) "Full scholarship" means a grant that meets the full cost for a student to attend the constituent institution for an academic year. (c) This section shall not be applied in any manner that violates federal law. (d) This section shall be administered by the electing constituent institution so as to have no fiscal impact. (e) In administering this section, the electing constituent institution shall maintain at least the current number of North Carolina residents admitted to that constituent institution. (2005-276, s. 9.27(a).)   15  
  16. 16. UNC SERVESApril 2011 Report to the PresidentOur nation has a tradition of offering education benefits to its veterans.In  the  1940s,  the  first  “G.I.  Bill”  was  transformative  for  the  7.8  million  veterans that used the benefit. For every dollar invested in veterans,seven dollars was generated.Veterans earn better grades and have a 75 percent graduation rate.With the exception of white males, veterans in all other race andgender groups earn more money than their non-veteran counterparts.Veterans start more small businesses. In general, Veterans outperformnon-Veterans.The first G.I. Bill sparked economic growth and expansion for a wholegeneration of Americans; a more robust G.I. bill holds the samepotential  for  today’s  economy.  This could not be truer than for NorthCarolina. To realize this potential our state must actively supportmilitary-affiliated students in its systems of public higher education. Wewant these students to choose a UNC education and we want them tolive and work in North Carolina.The UNC SERVES Working Groupbelieves that educating service members yields a high return oninvestment for North Carolina and the nation. And, in doing so theUniversity makes a significant down payment on the promise of UNCTomorrow to be more demand-driven, relevant and responsive to theneeds of North Carolina.The UNC SERVES Report to the President is a recommendation for firststeps toward fulfilling the promise of UNC Tomorrow for NorthCarolina’s  military  family.  And, in light of the next Base Realignmentand Closure process scheduled for 2015, we want to continue todemonstrate why North Carolina should receive continued militaryinvestment. While this report does not recommend all that can bedone to improve access, retention and graduation rates for military-affiliatedstudents at UNC, the UNC SERVES Working Group believesthat this report recommends that which can be reasonably tackled andachieved at this time.The UNC SERVES Working Group intends for this document torepresent  a  “stake  in  the  ground”  to  reaffirm  the  University’s  commitment  to  North  Carolina’s  military.  To borrow a phrase fromUncle Sam –  we want you in the University of North Carolina.UNC SERVES   16  
  17. 17. ««««««««Working Group Members««««««««    Ann Marie Beall (UNC-Wilmington), ChairDr. Thomas Conway (Fayetteville State University), ChairDr. Steve Duncan (East Carolina University), ChairCommittee I: Access (Ann Marie Beall, Chair)Goal: Assist and encourage qualified military-affiliated students to identify and enroll in UNCprograms bestsuited to meet their educational needs.Admissions, Financial Aid, Enrollment, Residency, Orientation, Marketing, Recruitment,Communication,Institutional Reporting, Yellow Ribbon Program, Transfer of General Ed Credit, CompulsorySeparation,Transfer  Articulation,  Ft.  Bragg  “One-Stop  Center”  Ann Marie Beall UNC-Wilmington, AdmissionsDr. Susan McCracken Appalachian State University, External AffairsDr. Scott Jenkins North Carolina A&T State University, Institutional ResearchSteve Farmer UNC-Chapel Hill, AdmissionsNorma Houston UNC-Chapel Hill, Faculty, School of GovernmentShannon Miles UNC-Wilmington, Financial AidChuck Gross Western Carolina University, Military ProgramsDr. Bruce Mallette UNC General Administration, Academic and Student AffairsGilberto Alvarado Fayetteville State University, UNC One Stop CenterCommittee II: Academic Services (Thomas Conway, Chair)Goal: Ensure an academically rigorous learning experience for military-affiliated students &veterans that isrelevant, attractive, and convenient.Transition, Academic Counseling, Degree Relevancy, Communication, Adaptable CourseOfferings,Distance Education, Transfer of Departmental Credit, Separation & Readmission, Base EducationCentersDr. Thomas Conway Fayetteville State University, Chief of StaffClayton Sessoms East Carolina University, Continuing StudiesDr. Vivian Mott East Carolina University, Chair, Counselor and Adult EducationDr. Lou Riggans Fayetteville State University, Faculty and Transfer and AdvisementDr. Tracey Ford North Carolina A&T State University, AdvisingDr. Roger Lowery UNC-Wilmington, Chair, Dept. Public and International StudiesDr. Remonda Kleinberg UNC-Wilmington, FacultyDr. Sandie Gravett UNC Faculty Assembly, ChairDr. Richard C. Kearney North Carolina State University, FacultyDr. Jim Sadler UNC General Administration, Academic PlanningRyan Beck UNC General Administration, Military AffairsUNC SERVES   17  
  18. 18. Committee III: Support Services and Outreach (Jose Picart, Chair)Goal: Provide a coordinated system of support services to enhance military-affiliated studentsuccess. Establish acampus environment that values and appreciates military-affiliated students.Veteran Student Life, Disability Services, Health and Wellness, Communication, CommunityEngagement, Veterans Administration Relations, ROTC Engagement, Campus EngagementDr. Jose Picart North Carolina State University, Diversity and InclusionMary Chakales UNC-Asheville, Student AffairsDr. David Spano UNC-Charlotte, Counseling CenterMary Helen Walker UNC-Pembroke, Disability ServicesMatt Goers (Student) UNC-Wilmington, Student Veterans OrganizationAmy Hector UNC-Wilmington, Student AffairsDr. Joe Wescott North Carolina State Approving AgencyLogan Cason UNC-Charlotte, Veteran Student OutreachAubrey Swett UNC-Pembroke, Community and Civic EngagementDr. Karrie Dixon UNC General Administration, Academic and Student AffairsCraig Kabatchnick North Carolina Central University, Faculty, School of LawJoshua Green UNC-Greensboro, Student AffairsCommittee IV: Strategic Planning (Ron Lingle and Beth Barton, Chairs)Goal: To fulfill the promise of UNC Tomorrow for  North  Carolina’s  Military  Family  through  effective  Military  Relations to positively impact the North Carolina Military Family and the Stateof North Carolina.  Military  Relations,  “UNC  Online,”  Marketing,  Institutional  Planning,  Communication,  CommunityCollege Collaboration, Statutory Changes, Independent College & University CollaborationDr. Ron Lingle Coastal Carolina Community College, PresidentDr. Beth Barton UNC-Wilmington, Military LiaisonDr. Steve Duncan East Carolina University, Military LiaisonLTC Ken Ratashak North Carolina State University, Professor of Military ScienceHolly Danford North Carolina State University, Veterans Certifying OfficialErin Schuettpelz UNC-Chapel Hill, State Relations and CommunicationsMike Tarrant UNC-Greensboro, State and Federal RelationsDan Lewandowski UNC General AdministrationKimrey Rhinehardt UNC General Administration, Federal RelationsEthan Elliot (Student) North Carolina State University, StudentStaff to the Working GroupKimrey Rhinehardt, Vice President for Federal Relations, UNC General AdministrationRyan Beck, Advisor for Military Affairs, UNC General AdministrationUNC SERVES         18  
  19. 19. ««««««««The Charge««««««««    Questions for the UNC SERVES Working Group:How are UNC institutions currently serving active service members, student veterans and theirfamilies (military-affiliated students)?What are the accepted best practices for serving these students?What can the University reasonably do to improve access, retention and graduation of thesestudents?What are metrics of success for the University in serving these students?Charge to the UNC SERVES Working Group:Report and Recommend to the President of the University:Evaluation of current state of active duty military and veteran affairs on UNC institutionsInstitutional, system-wide, and state/federal statutory policy changes, regulations and/orguidelines to improve access, retention and the graduation of active duty military and veteranson UNC institutions, Institutional and system-wide best practices to improve access, retention andthe graduation of active-duty military and veterans on UNC institutions Opportunities forinstitutional and system-wide improvementFactors for UNC SERVES Working Group Recommendations:Diversity of institutions, including size, capacity, and number of active duty military and veteransConstrained resources –  Consider all options but prioritize no cost, low cost recommendationsReturn on investmentCosts should accompany each recommendation, if possibleDefinition of Military-Affiliated Student:A military-affiliated student is one who is: in Active or Reserve status, in Veteran status, or aspouse or dependent of a service member in active, Reserve, or Veteran status, and in the U.S.Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Coast Guard, ArmyNational Guard, Army Reserve, Marine Forces Reserve, Navy Reserve, Air National Guard,Air Force Reserve, or Coast Guard Reserve.Exclusions from UNC SERVES:Research policies or practices, Pre-deployment  training  or  “reach  back”  development, andRecommendations for specific Academic content or Academic program development.The End State:Position the University to attract, retain and graduate military-affiliated students. Develop asystem-wide approach to supporting military-affiliated students and the campuses that servethem. Enable campuses to share information, best practices and possible solutions for system-wide issues facing military-affiliated students.SERVESNational NeedFor nearly a decade, American men and women have been engaged in wars in Iraq andAfghanistan.  Our  nation  is  in  an  “era  of  persistent  conflict”  and  our armed forces are  servingthe American people in various capacities  around the world. Institutions of higher  education arecritical to the  military’s  strategy  to  develop, prepare and deploy the leaders required  for currentand future global conflicts. Active-­‐duty service members totaled nearly 1.5 million at  the end ofJanuary 2011 and, each year  approximately one-third of these service  members enroll in post-secondary education  using Department of Defense Tuition Assistance  funds.  Veterans are entitled to education benefits. Veterans who have served since September 11,   19  
  20. 20. 2001 have earned additional educational benefits. These benefits are the most comprehensiveeducational benefits since the “Servicemen’s  Readjustment  Act  of  1944,”  also  known  as  the  “GI  Bill.”  The original GI Bill is said to have produced 50 years of economic prosperity for America. Withover 2-million service members having served since 2001, the Post 9/11 GI Bill has the potentialto unleash the next  “Greatest  Generation”  and reinvigorate economic prosperity.Active-duty military and veterans are non-traditional students with non-traditional needs andexperiences. These students work full-time jobs, often in some of the most remote locations in theworld.Veteran students are attempting to integrate themselves into civilian society while simultaneouslydealing with serious social and emotional challenges. The University is not immune to thesechallenges.Since July 2009, the American Council on Education and the Lumina Foundation issued threemajor reports on higher education support for service members, veterans and their families. Ingeneral, these reports reinforce the need for all institutions of higher education to: collect data onthese students; train faculty and staff about the military population –  particularly staff that mustprocess student accounts and financial aid; provide disability and mental health services; extendconsistent transfer of credit guidelines and transparency of the guidelines; provide targetedorientation and information sessions for these students; and establish a campus-based studentveterans group to provide support among peers.North Carolina and the MilitaryIn North Carolina, the military is more than just a federal government presence –  the soldiers,sailors, Marines, airmen, Coast Guardsmen and their families are part of the North Carolinafamily. As such, the University endeavors to fulfill the promise of UNC Tomorrow for all NorthCarolinians and most especially for North  Carolina’s  military  family.“America can succeed only with leaders who are themselves full-spectrum in their thinking. The militarywill not be able to train or educate you to have all the right answers –  as you might find in a manual –  butyou should look for those experiences and pursuits in your career that will help you at least ask the rightquestions. The diversity of experiences and essential adaptability of this generation are crucial to dealingwith the complexity of conflict in this century.”Robert Gates, Secretary of DefenseTo the Cadets of the United States Military Academy(West Point, NY)February 25, 2011North Carolina has the third largest active duty, National Guard, and Reserve presence in thecountry where just five states host roughly half of the nation’s  armed  forces. On a per capitabasis, North Carolina has the highest percentage of the total active duty, National Guard andReserve personnel in the country.  And,  North  Carolina’s  active  duty  military  population  continues  to  grow.  The projected economic impact of the military in the state will be nearly$26.3 Billion in 2013. While these figures are significant, they do not account for economicgrowth resulting from military-affiliated students seeking a higher education and transitioning toprivate sector employment, including new small business.The UNC SERVES Working Group believes that educating service members yields a high returnon investment for North Carolina and the nation.   20  
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