Hand Protection

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HAND SAFETY

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Hand Protection

  1. 1. HAND PROTECTION TRAINING Personnel Safety – Zee Medical
  2. 2. Preventing hand injuries                                    
  3. 3. Preventing hand injuries                                                                                                             
  4. 4. Hand injuries prevalent
  5. 5. Facts <ul><li>HAND/FINGER INJURIES ACCOUNT FOR 25.3% OF LOST TIME INJURIES IN THE WORK PLACE </li></ul><ul><li>2004 THERE WERE 1.4 MILLION WORK RELATED HAND INJURIES </li></ul><ul><li>ROUGHLY 30,000 HAND INJURIES OCCURRED IN ARIZONA </li></ul><ul><li>AVERAGE COST PER HAND INJURY IS APPROX. $45OO </li></ul>
  6. 6. Facts <ul><li>USE OF GLOVES REDUCES HAND INJURIES BY 20% </li></ul><ul><li>GLOVES WILL NOT PROTECT YOU IF: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>THEY ARE NOT USED </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IF THE WRONG GOVE IS USED FOR THE APPLICATION </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>GLOVES ARE INADEQUATE OR WORN OUT </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Protective Properties <ul><li>Chemical Resistant </li></ul><ul><li>Abrasion Resistant </li></ul><ul><li>Heat Resistant </li></ul><ul><li>Cold Resistant </li></ul><ul><li>Cut Resistant </li></ul><ul><li>Puncture Resistant </li></ul><ul><li>High-Voltage Insulating </li></ul>
  8. 8. Types of glove hand protection <ul><li>Unsupported gloves are best when there is a need for greater dexterity in applications requiring mild chemical protection or a disposable glove solution. The gauge identifies the mil thickness of a glove. A thin gauge allows a sense of touch and a heavy gauge provides greater protection and durability. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Chemical Resistance <ul><li>Because of the many varied uses for gloves and chemicals found in the workplace, we recommend contacting us, referring to your MSDS sheet or referring to a chemical – glove degradation chart </li></ul>
  10. 11. Chemical Resistance - Areas Of Concern: <ul><li>Permeation - the resistance to chemicals breaking the gloves protective film, which occurs at the molecular level. </li></ul><ul><li>Breakthrough - The elapsed time between initial chemical contact and detection inside the glove </li></ul><ul><li>Low Detection Limit (LDL) - Measured in parts per million (PPM), this is the minimum level detected with analytical test equipment at breakthrough time. </li></ul>
  11. 12. Leather Gloves <ul><li>Leather gloves are best for protection from rough objects, sparks and heat, and for cushioning from blows in heavy duty work requirements. All kinds of leather provide comfort, durability, dexterity, mild heat resistance and abrasion protection. </li></ul>
  12. 13. Cotton Gloves <ul><li>Cotton gloves are a good choice for comfort and breathability in general purpose applications and, in heavier weights, for abrasion and heat protection. Cotton gloves can also be used to protect the product as well as the hands. </li></ul>
  13. 14. String Knit Gloves <ul><li>String knit gloves are used for general purpose work applications Various material weights provide longer durability or additional dexterity where needed. Some styles may be dipped or coated with a polymer to provide a better grip and increase durability. </li></ul>
  14. 15. String Gloves – Cut & Abrasion <ul><li>High performance strings provide cut and abrasion resistance, using high performance yarns, to further protect the hands when working with sharp objects. Various material weights provide longer durability or additional dexterity where needed. Some styles may be dipped or coated with a polymer to provide a better grip and increase durability. </li></ul>
  15. 16. Supported & Dipped Gloves <ul><li>Supported gloves are great for protection against against solvents and chemical resistance, abrasions, cuts and punctures. The glove shell can be dipped into a polymer or the material can be dipped into a polymer before the glove is sewn. The work applications determine which glove option is the best choice for your hand protection needs. </li></ul>
  16. 17. Leather Terminology
  17. 18. Leather Terminology
  18. 19. Leather Overview
  19. 20. Leather Overview
  20. 21. Size <ul><li>Properly fitted gloves are important for hand protection. Glove size can be established by use of a tape measure to determine the circumference of your hand around the palm area. For example, if your hand circumference is 9&quot;, you would wear approximately a size 9 glove. It is important to note that glove sizes vary, often gloves come with numeric sizes. </li></ul>
  21. 22. Size <ul><li>Measure around the hand with a tape measure </li></ul><ul><li>Do not measure around the thumb </li></ul><ul><li>A dominant hand measurement is preferred </li></ul>
  22. 23. Size 11 Extra Extra Large (XXL) 11” - 12&quot; 10 Extra large (XL) 10” - 11&quot; 9 Large (L) 9” - 10&quot; 8 Medium (M) 8” - 9&quot; 7 Small (S) 7” - 8&quot; Numerical Non Numerical Hand Circumference
  23. 24. Thumb Types <ul><li>Keystone – Classic Design – Superior Movement & Comfort </li></ul><ul><li>Wing – Angled Construction good flexibility no seams in palm area to wear. </li></ul><ul><li>Straight Thumb – Simple design, inexpensive good for gripping </li></ul><ul><li>Reversible Thumb – Found on reversible, ambidextrous gloves. </li></ul>
  24. 25. Gauge (thickness) <ul><li>Mil’s generally apply to disposable or chemical glove types </li></ul><ul><li>Glove thickness is measured in gauge or mil (0.018&quot; gauge = 18mil). If you require more flexibility and a sensitive touch, choose a low mil glove. When seeking more protection, choose a heavy mil (thicker) material. </li></ul>
  25. 26. Gauge (thickness) <ul><li>Is a 15 mil Latex Glove stronger then a 8 mil Nitrile Glove ? </li></ul><ul><li>Depends on what chemical exposure you have. Generally a Nitrile glove is 3 times stronger and 3 times the chemical resistance. </li></ul><ul><li>Latex stretches more and may be more comfortable. </li></ul>
  26. 27. Supported vs. Unsupported <ul><li>Supported gloves provide more durable hand protection than unsupported gloves of the same material. </li></ul><ul><li>Generally, a supported glove has a fabric liner </li></ul><ul><li>The unsupported glove provide more tactile sensitivity and dexterity </li></ul>
  27. 28. <ul><li>Among professionals, the circular saw is probably the most commonly used power saw and perhaps the most commonly abused. </li></ul><ul><li>Familiarity should not breed carelessness. </li></ul><ul><li>The following are specific safety musts when using any portable circular saws. </li></ul>Portable Circular Saws
  28. 29. <ul><li>Don't wear loose clothing, jewelry or dangling objects, including long hair, that may catch in rotating parts or accessories. </li></ul><ul><li>Don't use a circular saw that is too heavy for you to easily control. </li></ul><ul><li>Always wear safety goggles or safety glasses with side shields complying with the current national standard and a full face shield when needed. Use a dust mask in dusty work conditions. Wear hearing protection during extended periods of operation. </li></ul>Portable Circular Saws
  29. 30. Portable Circular Saws <ul><li>Be sure the switch actuates properly. It should turn the tool on and return to the off position after release. </li></ul><ul><li>Use sharp blades. Dull blades cause binding, stalling and possible kickback. They also waste power and reduce motor and switch life. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the correct blade for the application. Check this carefully. Does it have the proper size and shape arbor hole? Is the speed marked on the blade at least as high as the no-load RPM on the saw's nameplate? </li></ul>
  30. 31. Portable Circular Saws <ul><li>Is the blade guard working? Check for proper operation before each cut. Check often to ensure that guards return to their normal position quickly. If a guard seems slow to return or hangs up, repair or adjust it immediately. Never defeat the guard to expose the blade by, for example, tying it back or removing it. </li></ul><ul><li>Before starting a circular saw, be sure the power cord and extension cord are out of the blade path and are long enough to freely complete the cut. Keep aware of the cord location. A sudden jerk or pulling on the cord can cause loss of control of the saw and a serious accident. </li></ul>
  31. 32. Watch out for… <ul><li>PINCH POINTS </li></ul><ul><li>SHARP EDGES OR CORNERS </li></ul><ul><li>BROKEN OR DAMAGED HAND TOOLS </li></ul><ul><li>HANDLING HEAVY OBJECTS </li></ul><ul><li>MACHINERY MALFUNCTIONS </li></ul><ul><li>REPETATIVE MOTION </li></ul>
  32. 33. <ul><li>Hand Safety 1. Do not wear rings, loose jewelry or bracelets that may catch on moving or stationary machinery. 2. Be conscious of where your hands are at all times. Be cautious when placing your hands or arms near spinning or fast moving parts. 3. Turn off machinery or equipment in order to inspect, to clean or to perform repairs. 4. Do not remove shields, guards or safety devices on industrial equipment or farm machinery. Do not use equipment that has had any safety device removed. 5. Use caution when using power driving tools. 6. Be cautious when wearing gloves or loose clothing around equipment with moving parts. </li></ul>
  33. 34. REMEMBER! <ul><li>REMEMBER AGAIN GLOVES WON’T PROTECT YOU IF DON’T USE THEM, USE THE WRONG GLOVE FOR THE APPLICATION, OR IF YOUR GLOVES ARE INADEQTE OR WORN OUT. </li></ul>

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